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Apple's Maps team calling businesses to resolve user-reported address issues - Page 2

post #41 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacVicta View Post

Apple has put itself in a serious bind with its absence from the search business. You can never be truly independent without your own search engine.

Independence has its benefits, but sometimes working with partners is more practical. If Apple wanted to, they could get white label Bing search just like Yahoo does. Building ones own search engine from scratch is a decade long undertaking, just like Apple Maps will end up being before it will be considered truly professional grade.

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post #42 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by rob53 View Post
 

My daughter bought a new house on a "lane" that is part of her HOA, not a city street. The city/county changed the name a couple times during her buying process causing all sorts of problems. The county assessor has the correct name and location yet the mapping companies don't seem to get street information from them. I talked to a person at a city government office and she had to contact someone else before everything finally was fixed but said the mapping companies don't update their databases except (maybe) twice a year. I don't believe there is a single source for mapping information although the assessor's office should be the most accurate information.

 

Assessor's office keeps data on parcel value and not roads (unless it's a private road and even then that road would have to be a separate parcel such as an HOA road for a subdivision).  Their road data is probably rarely ever updated. 

post #43 of 79
Glad to hear they are trying to make Maps better and more accurate!
post #44 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post
 

I think Google will continue to be the map leader for two main reasons. One, they can use their search data and apply it to maps, and two, they can use their Street View data and apply that to maps as well. They have all the data they need. Apple has none of that.

 

I think Google will continue to be the map "leader" because you only get a one opportunity to make a first impression, and for Apple Maps, that opportunity has past. In years to come, Apple Maps will get better, but people tend to remember big, splashy flameouts, not quiet, steady improvement.

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post #45 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

Independence has its benefits, but sometimes working with partners is more practical. If Apple wanted to, they could get white label Bing search just like Yahoo does. Building ones own search engine from scratch is a decade long undertaking, just like Apple Maps will end up being before it will be considered truly professional grade.
I didn't say it would be quick or easy. You're right that it will take years, and that's why the sooner they get started the better. I'm sure there's many within Apple who feel they need their own search engine and it's time to end the internal debate and get the ball rolling. Every day they waste is another day they could've spent getting closer to the finish line, such as standing idle while companies like Google buy up other firms to strengthen their search ambitions.

Apple needs their own search engine and it's only a matter of time before they finally reach that conclusion.
post #46 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacVicta View Post
 
Apple needs their own search engine and it's only a matter of time before they finally reach that conclusion.

Search is not really a stand alone product. It is generally expected that it be coupled with ads. Businesses want to achieve top page rank so search is by definition very commercial. Apple has dabbled in the advertising sector but mostly to support third party developers not to really be in the advertising business. I don't think iAds is really a commercial success either. All of Apple's online services are designed as benefits to Apple hardware buyers not commercial enterprises for their own sake.

 

Anyway, once they start working on it, it won't be a secret, because they will need a page crawling bot which will show up in the logs.

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post #47 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by Suddenly Newton View Post
 

I think Google will continue to be the map "leader" because you only get a one opportunity to make a first impression, and for Apple Maps, that opportunity has past. In years to come, Apple Maps will get better, but people tend to remember big, splashy flameouts, not quiet, steady improvement.

I don't think that is all that important. Apple has prime visibility on the iOS home screen. Most people will default to that rather than intentionally go to Google Maps. Also, MapKit will give developers the ability to integrate Apple Maps into their apps. Once Apple Maps is really good, then people will forget about the stumble out of the gate. I would guess it will take at least a few more years before they get there.

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post #48 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacVicta View Post

I didn't say it would be quick or easy. You're right that it will take years, and that's why the sooner they get started the better. I'm sure there's many within Apple who feel they need their own search engine and it's time to end the internal debate and get the ball rolling. Every day they waste is another day they could've spent getting closer to the finish line, such as standing idle while companies like Google buy up other firms to strengthen their search ambitions.

Apple needs their own search engine and it's only a matter of time before they finally reach that conclusion.

I often think buying Yahoo might be the quickest way to start the ball rolling in search and they gain other useful stuff too. Just not sure if that would be cheaper than starting from scratch though, I suspect time might be more valuable to save than money though ... just thinking out loud here ... They were quite close but Apple seems to have stepped a wee bit further away recently.
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post #49 of 79

I mentioned in the last article that I had resubmitted some of the things I’d done initially, none of which had been fixed.

 

Several have been fixed now. Several others, right next door, haven’t, but it’s infinitely faster than before.

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post #50 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

I don't think that is all that important. Apple has prime visibility on the iOS home screen. Most people will default to that rather than intentionally go to Google Maps. Also, MapKit will give developers the ability to integrate Apple Maps into their apps. Once Apple Maps is really good, then people will forget about the stumble out of the gate. I would guess it will take at least a few more years before they get there.

I must admit I do use Street view a lot on Google maps and let us not forget Google Earth is pretty impressive. I support Apple 100% in dumping Google ASAP but obviously it is not because Googles mapping is bad, it's simply because Google back stabbed Apple and stole the iOS IP. So, my point is, Apple might soon be able to match basic Google maps but I'd miss Street view and Earth if I didn't have them. I don't see Apple trying to replicate either of those efforts ... does anyone think they would?
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post #51 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by digitalclips View Post

I must admit I do use Street view a lot on Google maps ...

I don't use Street View much at all. I know it is important for realtors and home buying, leasing and getting to know a new city, but I rarely need that. What do you use Street View for?

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post #52 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacVicta View Post

I didn't say it would be quick or easy. You're right that it will take years, and that's why the sooner they get started the better. I'm sure there's many within Apple who feel they need their own search engine and it's time to end the internal debate and get the ball rolling. Every day they waste is another day they could've spent getting closer to the finish line, such as standing idle while companies like Google buy up other firms to strengthen their search ambitions.

Apple needs their own search engine and it's only a matter of time before they finally reach that conclusion.

Would the Apple search engine help this maps/POI problem? Or are you talking about a search engine in general to get away from Google?

For POI data... the information has to be somewhere online for Apple's search engine to crawl.

But I'm getting the impression from this thread that there is NOT an online location where all this POI data exists.

If there was... why couldn't Apple just licence that data instead of building a search engine to crawl the web?

I agree that Apple should build a search engine... but I'm not seeing how it will help their maps woes.
post #53 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael Scrip View Post
 
I agree that Apple should build a search engine... but I'm not seeing how it will help their maps woes.

Every company has a web page and almost all of them have their current address and phone number listed. There is also invisible web server, network info which can be cross referenced to registrars to know what types of searches are being done from a certain location by knowing the IP blocks that serve a company.

 

Google crawls my web pages almost every single day.

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post #54 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by Euphonious View Post
 

Try living in the UK - the POI content on Apple Maps is appalling.

 

Unlike Google, whose worldwide database seems pretty comprehensive, Apple seems intent on treating anyone who doesn't live in North America as a second-class citizen.

Pretty funny coming from The British "Empire".

post #55 of 79
Originally Posted by Euphonious View Post

Apple seems intent on treating anyone who doesn't live in North America as a second-class citizen.

 

Given that they’re an American company, I’m confused why you find this confusing. Enjoy Airstrip One. ;)

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post #56 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

Every company has a web page and almost all of them have their current address and phone number listed. There is also invisible web server, network info which can be cross referenced to registrars to know what types of searches are being done from a certain location by knowing the IP blocks that serve a company.

Google crawls my web pages almost every single day.

Gotcha... that makes sense. They need to get on with it then! 1smile.gif

I can see that working for small businesses... but what about large chains?

Would Apple's search engine have to scrape McDonalds.com or Subway.com to get the addresses of all their restaurants? Or the hundreds of other restaurants and stores with one website but many locations?
post #57 of 79

I definitely sense a sea change coming with Apple's Maps. Just in the past week, I saw the new error reporting option for Apple to notify you when they make the correction. I like that this now creates some accountability. In the past, I would submit an error report and over a year would pass before I finally see the map corrected (and of course, there was no option for notification, so you had no idea when they actually fixed things).

 

Someone mentioned that Apple no longer relies on Yelp for business location data. However, I do recall that Apple supposedly did not display businesses that fell below a certain Yelp rating (or I guess a certain number of reviews). The business would still come up if you search for it, but Apple did not display it by default. I don't know if these Yelp ties still exist, but I know that the businesses displayed on Apple Maps are still hit or miss, with a lot of missing entries.

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by mstone View Post
 

In southern California, before Internet mapping, there was a company named Thomas Bros. Maps. They published new maps each year for every county and every government vehicle was required to have the most current version. I think they are out of business now. Their headquarters in Irvine closed. Anyway they indeed listed every single street, highway, alleyway and public building, but they surely had to contact every little city, every county, and the state, and the information wasn't digital either. That is a tremendous amount of work. But it can be done.

 

Thomas Bros. charged a lot of money for those books, and their business depended on extreme accuracy because the police and fire departments relied on them. Apple doesn't seem to have that sense of responsibility or urgency, and their revenue stream is not at all affected by the lack of map accuracy. I'm not sure what mapping the police use today but I'd be willing to bet it isn't Apple.

The Thomas Guides are now published by Rand McNally. Apparently, they are no longer updated with the same veracity as when Thomas Bros. operated, and no longer updated annually. The Wikipedia entry says that they now purchase the database info from third parties that might not know the local terrain as well as Thomas Bros. once did. Thomas did actually make the transition to digital mapping and retained the same fanatical attention to accuracy until they overexpanded their territory into several other states and had to be bought out.

 

I remember that the City of LA keyed their aerial photos (in the days before satellite images could be readily accessed) and many of their location-based docs to the Thomas Bros. grid. The guides were a staple in city-owned vehicles and IIRC also with LAPD squad cars. Definitely the gold standard for local paper maps, and in many ways, a lot more readily readable than online maps.

post #58 of 79

I noticed that a location error I had reported several times over the last year or so, is now fixed.  Not sure if it took so long because I was the only one complaining or if it represents an increased effort on their part.  Either way, good to see it corrected.

post #59 of 79
POI's are a tough nut to crack. I've had many many errors with google maps too.
To answer the question- is there not one place that has a list of correct POI's?
Answer- sort of, it just needs to be gathered.
IMO - the best path forward is to partner(ie pay) with local, state, or country wide entries who's primary purposes are to know and go to said POI's on a regular basis. Example - US postal service/fedex/UPS. Do they or do they not essentially go to POI regularly? So... Pay these companies to audit public stand alone POI's with an iPhone strapped to a wrist. Phone should say -your are now here at this POI(s). YES NO? Then report.(don't hate, but google glass would be great for this) The wearer my or may not have time to update, but could be put in to a record. First go around will be full of errors that need correction. However, by some relatively short time, that list should be down to the normal flux of changes. Let's say it takes said employee 5 minutes to update. He/she would get paid say... $5 for each.
Of course this is greatly greatly... greatly simplified, but seems 'as a method' to be viable. Thoughts? Should I email Tim? /s That said, fedex etc could do this on their own and sell it!
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post #60 of 79
My business address is wrong on Apple and Google maps.
post #61 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by monstrosity View Post

My business address is wrong on Apple and Google maps.

I wonder where they got that data from?

Did you move your business from one address to another? Or is it listed somewhere completely wrong? Maybe they have old data that hasn't been updated... but what is that data?

I want to know where Apple and Google gets these addresses in the first place. If we knew that, we'd at least have a place to start making corrections.

No one seems to know where they get this data from... yet all the POI data is dependent upon it.

Apple used to think there were two Walmarts in my town... one at the correct address... and one at an old factory. (there's only one Walmart)

I'm curious as to how Apple placed a 2nd Walmart at that wrong address. There shouldn't be a document or record on Earth that ever listed a Walmart at that wrong address. So how did it end up in Apple's listings?

They've since deleted the extra Walmart... but how did it happen in the first place?
post #62 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

I don't use Street View much at all. I know it is important for realtors and home buying, leasing and getting to know a new city, but I rarely need that. What do you use Street View for?

All of those, my wife is a Realtor so we definitely scope out areas for those reasons. Plus when I am going somewhere on vacation I like to explore the area at ground level. I find when I get there I get my sense of where I am kicks in very quickly from the visual memory of seeing the place for real before. On top of that I just love exploring places I will never go and seeing what they really look like and lastly I explore places I know, but haven't visited in decades (such as the UK and Spain where I used to live) to see how they have changed. I probably missed many other reasons out.

Pure coincidence ... just came across this article: http://www.smithsonianmag.com/travel/first-time-ever-you-can-explore-angkor-wat-google-street-view-180950348/
Edited by digitalclips - 7/12/14 at 7:45pm
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post #63 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael Scrip View Post

I want to know where Apple and Google gets these addresses in the first place. If we knew that, we'd at least have a place to start making corrections.

No one seems to know where they get this data from... yet all the POI data is dependent upon it.

You'd have to contact the individual companies in question, but in many cases, there are clues in the copyright block for the mapping service. Sources like Navteq, TomTom, OpenStreetMap, etc. are often quoted, so those are some of the original sources. 

 

If Navteq put your nearby pizzeria on the wrong block on their maps, and Big Internet Company X buys Navteq's map data, well, Big Internet Company X's map will have that pizzeria on the wrong block.

 

Note that Big Internet Company X's deal with the map provider may not include incremental updates. If that is the case, it is up to Big Internet Company X to make their own changes to the original dataset. Now if you were Big Internet Company X and you identified the correct location of the nearby pizzeria using their own team/effort, would you contact the map vendor and tell them their data was wrong? No, you'd keep the new/updated information to yourself and your map would be a bit more accurate than theirs.

 

If there is an original data source, you will find that information if you dig deep enough due to copyright law.

 

Remember that a map dataset is like a photograph, a snapshot in time. If I buy a map from the gas station, or if I pick one up from the AAA office, that's a map that covers street data from a narrow time band. It won't list the previous names of streets, it won't show new construction (like the new eastern span of the SF Bay Bridge). Unless the map vendor and the customer agree on terms for periodic data updates, it's likely a one-time dataset purchase.

 

Based on Apple's behavior (including acquisition of numerous mapping companies), it is highly likely that Apple made a one-time map dataset purchase and walked away, believing that they would be able to do a better job at updating the dataset themselves versus subscribing to updates from the map vendor.


Edited by mpantone - 7/12/14 at 4:04pm
post #64 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by mpantone View Post

You'd have to contact the individual companies in question, but in many cases, there are clues in the copyright block for the mapping service. Sources like Navteq, TomTom, OpenStreetMap, etc. are often quoted, so those are some of the original sources. 

If Navteq put your nearby pizzeria on the wrong block on their maps, and Big Internet Company X buys Navteq's map data, well, Big Internet Company X's map will have that pizzeria on the wrong block.

Note that Big Internet Company X's deal with the map provider may not include incremental updates. If that is the case, it is up to Big Internet Company X to make their own changes to the original dataset. Now if you were Big Internet Company X and you identified the correct location of the nearby pizzeria using their own team/effort, would you contact the map vendor and tell them their data was wrong? No, you'd keep the new/updated information to yourself and your map would be a bit more accurate than theirs.

If there is an original data source, you will find that information if you dig deep enough due to copyright law.

Remember that a map dataset is like a photograph, a snapshot in time. If I buy a map from the gas station, or if I pick one up from the AAA office, that's a map that covers street data from a narrow time band. It won't list the previous names of streets, it won't show new construction (like the new eastern span of the SF Bay Bridge). Unless the map vendor and the customer agree on terms for periodic data updates, it's likely a one-time dataset purchase.

Based on Apple's behavior (including acquisition of numerous mapping companies), it is highly likely that Apple made a one-time map dataset purchase and walked away, believing that they would be able to do a better job at updating the dataset themselves versus subscribing to updates from the map vendor.
http://blog.telemapics.com/?p=386

http://www.tomtom.com/lib/doc/Maps%20White%20paper_UK.pdf
Edited by Gatorguy - 7/12/14 at 5:18pm
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post #65 of 79
B.S. I've used Maps reporting well over a dozen items over 3 years to tell Apple that the town I live in, Marblemount, WA, is not 25 miles from here on a mountain inaccessible by road. Considering we have a post office, which I repeatedly pinpoint, Apple has not corrected this, nor has anyone contacted me.

They're so concerned about an individual business, but don't care when they misplace an entire town - after being notified over a dozen times.
post #66 of 79

Those two links are meaningless at this point.

 

Apple purchased a map dataset of ___ quality from TomTom at a certain point. They have been updating it with their own corrections.

 

Before there was anyone on the Internet doing mapping stuff, there were only a couple of these databases around. Now there are more players, but most of them go back to a handful of sources, licensed at different times, of course.

 

What is your point of posting those two links dated from 2012? Sure, those links would have been relevant in the online mapping world in 2012, but things have changed, companies move forward (Apple itself has purchased a number of other mapping companies and appear to be fixing issues on a daily basis).

post #67 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by mpantone View Post


What is your point of posting those two links dated from 2012?

It should be obvious if you read the linked articles. One explains the data that goes into a map and how updates are put together. The other lists the data sources and partners for Apple maps along with what now appears to be fairly accurate comments on potential issues for them as they begin their mapping venture. Both are things that you yourself discussed. I simply added more detail from professional sources for anyone interested. You are not one of those interested parties it would seem.
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post #68 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

It should be obvious if you read the linked articles. One explains the data that goes into a map update while the other lists the data sources and partners for Apple maps. Both are things that you yourself discussed. I simply added more detail from professional sources for anyone interested. You obviously are not one of those interested parties.

Ah, but we don't know if Apple is using the TomTom service as a subscription, as many GPS navigation app services might be doing, or if they purchased the Tele Atlas data as a one-time event.

 

Let's say you are little GPS app developer: yes, you can purchase and repackage the TomTom map data, and all the updates come from TomTom. 

 

Note that the PDF you linked refers to TomTom's retail product, including Map Share. There is no interface on Apple Maps to access Map Share.

 

The blog entry is even more tenuous. It is penned by a third-party map industry writer written before Apple actually released their map to the world. Basically, it was a speculative "reply" to what was announced during WWDC 2012.

 

Again, your two links are not really relevant in mid-July 2014.

 

You appear to have a tendency to post technical links that actually have no or minimal relevance to the topic at hand.

 

I'm just Joe Consumer.


Edited by mpantone - 7/12/14 at 7:57pm
post #69 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by mpantone View Post

Ah, but we don't know if Apple is using the TomTom service as a subscription, as many GPS navigation app services might be doing. 

Let's say you are little GPS app developer: yes, you can purchase and repackage the TomTom map data, and all the updates come from TomTom. 

Note that the PDF you linked refers to TomTom's retail product, including Map Share. There is no interface on Apple Maps to access Map Share.

The blog entry is even more tenuous. It is penned by a third-party map industry writer written before Apple actually released their map to the world. Basically, it was a speculative "reply" to what was announced during WWDC 2012.

Again, your two links are not really relevant in mid-July 2014.

Makes no difference to the relevancy whether TomTom is supplying on-going map updates or not. Apple would have to go thru the same general steps TomTom would if doing it themselves. So yeah, it's kinda relevant to those that have an interest. Regarding Dr. Dobson's article written prior to Apple Maps public release here's his blog article written post-release.
http://blog.telemapics.com/?p=399

I guarantee that if you read those links in their entirety you learned something you didn't know. I did and I'd be willing to wager I'm at least as familiar with the subjects of mapping and location services as you good sir. 1wink.gif
Edited by Gatorguy - 7/12/14 at 8:40pm
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post #70 of 79
So far over the past month Apple has implemented many of the fixes I have submitted, however they still have not added the 2 major hospitals they are missing in my city. I included the address, phone number and websites when i reported the missing locations.
post #71 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post


Makes no difference to the relevancy whether TomTom is supplying on-going map updates or not. Apple would have to go thru the same general steps TomTom would if doing it themselves. So yeah, it's kinda relevant to those that have an interest. Regarding Dr. Dobson's article written prior to Apple Maps public release here's his blog article written post-release.
http://blog.telemapics.com/?p=399

I guarantee that if you read those links in their entirety you learned something you didn't know. I did and I'd be willing to wager I'm at least as familiar with the subjects of mapping and location services as you good sir. 1wink.gif

Here we go again.

 

Whatever procedures Apple, TomTom, OpenStreetMaps, whatever goes through to updated and improve their map data is completely irrelevant to Joe Consumer. 

 

Reading some highly speculative technical article by some map tech blogger does nothing to improve that map on Joe Consumer's smartphone or computer. I can read all of the blogs, spec sheets, whitepapers, whatever you throw at us. You describe the solution, but the documents describing the procedures still don't DO anything themselves. You reallydon't get that do you?

 

Plus, we don't even know if what map blogger and TomTom whitepaper is exactly what Apple does. Guess what? WE DON'T NEED TO KNOW WHAT GOES ON BEHIND THE SCENES. Heck, Apple doesn't even tell ADC members how they are updating map data.

 

You know, I could easily use my favorite search engine and find all the same documents you do. Why don't I? BECAUSE IT DOESN'T MATTER. Learning how it might work/be accomplished doesn't make it happen.

post #72 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by mpantone View Post

Here we go again.

Whatever procedures Apple, TomTom, OpenStreetMaps, whatever goes through to updated and improve their map data is completely irrelevant to Joe Consumer. 

Reading some highly speculative technical article by some map tech blogger does nothing to improve that map on Joe Consumer's smartphone or computer. I can read all of the blogs, spec sheets, whitepapers, whatever you throw at us. You describe the solution, but the documents describing the procedures still don't DO anything themselves. You reallydon't get that do you?

Plus, we don't even know if what map blogger and TomTom whitepaper is exactly what Apple does. Guess what? WE DON'T NEED TO KNOW WHAT GOES ON BEHIND THE SCENES. Heck, Apple doesn't even tell ADC members how they are updating map data.

You know, I could easily use my favorite search engine and find all the same documents you do. Why don't I? BECAUSE IT DOESN'T MATTER. Learning how it might work/be accomplished doesn't make it happen.

What are you on about now? You've lost your way. Do you even remember the question you attempted to answer that started this discussion? Here's the reminder
http://forums.appleinsider.com/t/181336/apples-maps-team-calling-businesses-to-resolve-user-reported-address-issues/40#post_2563356

Micheal Scrip asked and you offered an answer, albeit incomplete. I filled in the blanks for someone who had a stated interest. It's pretty silly that doing so bothers you so much.
Edited by Gatorguy - 7/12/14 at 9:18pm
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post #73 of 79
I always found Apple's entry into mapping short-sighted and reactionary (to distance themselves from Google). When I look at their platforms Google has a very broad platform built on "good enough" levels of software and devices (that's not a criticism, by the way, since "good enough" usually wins in consumer markets)., whereas Apple's claim to fame, whether you agree with it or not, is much more "perfecting the use-case". Additionally, Google has tremendous breadth and depth to support mapping activities, namely search and advertising. You almost couldn't come up,with a better prerequisite foundation for maps than search. Pile on top of that Google's head start and massive investment in the space (Google street view cars mapping everything in sight) and I find it hard to believe how Apple will *ever* catch up .... as in ever. The only possible saving grace for Apple is their recent entry into the automotive space. If they can somehow leverage that presence to refine their mapping data they will catch up quickly ... but right now I don't know how they would do that from a practical perspective.
post #74 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael Scrip View Post

Was Yelp the only source they used?

Of course not, read their attribution.html:
http://gspa21.ls.apple.com/html/attribution.html


Quote:
Originally Posted by sully54 View Post

I can actually appreciate now how apple didn't announce anything new for maps at WWDC. It seems they want to get the current iteration right first before they attempt to add new features. Perhaps in September when ios 8/Yosemite is launched they will finally add on new features.

Good point. May I add: please Apple, let me import/overlay my .gpx files on the Apple Maps app on OSX! And I can't find a good alternative to the shitty BaseCamp app from Garmin.
Quote:
My question is why don't they just use tomtom's POI data?

They already do, see above link.
Quote:
Originally Posted by digitalclips View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris_CA View Post

That would be Glacier Bay National Park, Alaska.
Glacier National Park is in Montana.

(Pedantry abounds!)

Sorry, you are correct, my bad.

I may have failed before, but I copied your "Glacier National Park" in Maps* and added ", Alaska" and it found it, telling me it's actually called "Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve"

(*on OSX)
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

I don't think iAds is really a commercial success either.

1) Neither do I

2) Merely responding to that line in order to stay on topic: I silly wanted people to check out the iAd Producer video on their software; looks really cool!

http://advertising.apple.com/tools/iad-producer/
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post #75 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post


Citation?

Citation is my post.  It's my opinion, not something I read elsewhere.

post #76 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brent McAnulty View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post

Citation?
Citation is my post.  It's my opinion, not something I read elsewhere.

I think your phrase "is coming" caused him to request a link or citation, which I think is understandable.

I agree with your wish for Apple Maps to gain a Spotlight-like search algorithm, though see my previous reply to @digitalclips on his search for a place in Alaska.
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post #77 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by TBell View Post

I like Ape Maps, but POI data is it's big weakness.

Been watching Planet of the Apes recently? Lol!
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post #78 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael Scrip View Post


I wonder where they got that data from?

Did you move your business from one address to another? Or is it listed somewhere completely wrong? Maybe they have old data that hasn't been updated... but what is that data?

I want to know where Apple and Google gets these addresses in the first place. If we knew that, we'd at least have a place to start making corrections.

No one seems to know where they get this data from... yet all the POI data is dependent upon it.
 

 

I Don't know, I'm trying to track down the source of the data at the moment. I get about 4 customers a day baffled by the map directions who eventually find us. I would say there were the same number of customers that never find us = lost business.

post #79 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by monstrosity View Post

I Don't know, I'm trying to track down the source of the data at the moment. I get about 4 customers a day baffled by the map directions who eventually find us. I would say there were the same number of customers that never find us = lost business.

I pointed to the answer a few posts back but to be specific Apple is apparently using at least three disparate sources: Acxiom, Localeze, and Yelp reviews. I imagine trying to combine the three into one when they sometimes differ on POI locations has been a headache.
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