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Google now warns iPhone users when search results contain Adobe Flash

post #1 of 47
Thread Starter 
Search giant Google added another board to Flash's coffin on Tuesday with the announcement that it would warn users searching from mobile devices -- like Apple's iPhone or Android handsets -- when the contents of a search result were "mostly Flash."




Rather than returning the website's description, Google will now tell mobile users that the site uses Flash and may not work on their device, before offering them the option to continue anyway. The announcement was first noticed by iClarified.

Google says that content which cannot be displayed on a mobile device -- like Flash -- is a "common annoyance" for mobile users. The company goes on to suggest that developers should eschew proprietary formats like Flash in favor of more widely-implemented standards such as HTML5.

"Fortunately, making websites that work on all modern devices is not that hard: websites can use HTML5 since it is universally supported, sometimes exclusively, by all devices," Google's announcement reads.

Apple's decision not to support Flash on its then-nascent iOS devices was a major point of contention even before late Apple CEO Steve Jobs penned his famous "thoughts on Flash" letter, with many panning the decision as short-sighted. The choice has since proven prophetic, however, with Flash's popularity waning thanks in no small part to developers' need to accomodate the massive popularity of the iPhone and iPad.
post #2 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

The choice has since proven prophetic, however, with Flash's popularity waning thanks in no small part to developers' need to accomodate the massive popularity of the iPhone and iPad.

This should read: "the massive popularity of smartphones and tablets including the iPhone and iPad" since the number of Android based devices is substantial.

 

Flash cannot die fast enough.

post #3 of 47

Prophetic to say the least. 

Steve, along with Apple got blasted for not supporting Flash and they also caught quite a bit of slack for making their iPad 4:3 aspect ratio. 

Today we are seeing Flash's march into irrelevance and Microsoft changing the Surface's aspect ratio from 16:9 to something like 3:2. Others are also following.

 

I wonder if Apple engineers are somewhere sharing a good laugh, since they had it right, from the start. 

post #4 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by mpantone View Post

This should read: "the massive popularity of smartphones and tablets including the iPhone and iPad" since the number of Android based devices is substantial.

Flash cannot die fast enough.

No. The death of Adobe Flash should be attributed almost singularly to Apple. Google Android proponents derided the lack of Adobe Flash support on Apple iPhones for years before finally accepting reality. Another indication of Google Android proponents disconnect with reality; support for the supposedly open Google Android and support for proprietary Adobe Flash.
post #5 of 47

Adobe abandoned Flash on all mobile platforms in November 2011.

 

It's possible that some of the Google Android proponents are living in a dreamworld, denying that Flash support was dropped almost three years ago.

 

That said, Joe Consumer using an Android device today doesn't know anything about this brouhaha. They just know that Flash doesn't work on their device.


Edited by mpantone - 7/15/14 at 10:57am
post #6 of 47
'Put another nail in someone's coffin', I am familiar with but not "added another board to someone's coffin" I must remember that, it's new one on me. As it's Flash I hope they keep adding both. 1smile.gif
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post #7 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

Search giant Google added another board to Flash's coffin on Tuesday with the announcement that it would warn users searching from mobile devices -- like Apple's iPhone or Android handsets -- when the contents of a search result were "mostly Flash."
 

Where does it say "Mostly Flash".

 

I wonder what amount of Flash will trigger this response and does Google know whether or not the developer already has an alternate page to show iOS users when they land on the site.

 

People who use Flash to design the navigation and interface of a website are clueless. Maybe some really old sites still have that but anything new should never use Flash for anything other than complex technical presentations that would be too difficult or impossible in HTML5, or if the server detects older IE for video playback.

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post #8 of 47

But...but... the Android fanboys all said that Flash is SO superior on their Android devices.  Where are they now?!  I guess they are just back to waiting for mommy to bring them down their next meal in the basement.

Good riddance Flash.  You should have been flushed down the toilet ages ago.  Steve Jobs ejecting it from iOS just goes to show how well he saw where the future was going, and Flash was not part of it.  I find it funny about all those articles written back in the day skewering Jobs and the iOS platform for not supporting Flash, and how great Android was for having it.  As the phrase "rinse & repeat" goes, those same people are conveniently quiet, pretending the crap coming out of their mouth, along with their hugely stupid opinions, never actually happened.

post #9 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

Where does it say "Mostly Flash".

I wonder what amount of Flash will trigger this response and does Google know whether or not the developer already has an alternate page to show iOS users when they land on the site.

People who use Flash to design the navigation and interface of a website are clueless. Maybe some really old sites still have that but anything new should never use Flash for anything other than complex technical presentations that would be too difficult or impossible in HTML5, or if the server detects older IE for video playback.

The "mostly flash" quote was from Google's blog post. It wasn't saying that was what the search page will say.
post #10 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post
 

Where does it say "Mostly Flash".

 

I wonder what amount of Flash will trigger this response and does Google know whether or not the developer already has an alternate page to show iOS users when they land on the site.

 

People who use Flash to design the navigation and interface of a website are clueless. Maybe some really old sites still have that but anything new should never use Flash for anything other than complex technical presentations that would be too difficult or impossible in HTML5, or if the server detects older IE for video playback.

It doesn't say "mostly Flash" on the search page. It says "mostly Flash" in the Google blog entry explaining the change:

 

http://googlewebmastercentral.blogspot.com/2014/07/promoting-modern-websites-for-modern.html

 

My guess is that Google's web crawler and search database processing algorithms can tell whether or not an alternate non-Flash content type is available for any given page, just as the hosting site figures out to serve up that content when it encounters a client browser that does not have Flash capability.

 

Note that the search result page doesn't prevent the searcher from going to the page, it's just a warning that the page may not function on the device in question. What is the threshold? Who knows? It's not like Google would explain in detail how their proprietary search algorithm works, and it's not relevant anyhow for the end user.

post #11 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by sflocal View Post
 

But...but... the Android fanboys all said that Flash is SO superior on their Android devices.  Where are they now?! 

Perhaps they have wisely switched to iPhones.

 

Quote:

Good riddance Flash.  You should have been flushed down the toilet ages ago.  Steve Jobs ejecting it from iOS just goes to show how well he saw where the future was going, and Flash was not part of it. 

I don't see it that way at all. I think what is happening is that Flash is now being reduced to a role where it belongs and should have always been. The reason Flash became so ubiquitous is because Apple, Microsoft and Google were stupidly battling for control of Internet video with incompatible formats, which is still going on to some extent, so in a way, Steve Jobs was partly responsible for the ascendance of Flash.

 

Flash is very useful for technical representations in training and other complex presentations, and regardless of how far HTML5 has come, it still has plenty of limitations, the biggest being the extreme difficulty of writing such complex code, not to mention the fact that some things are completely impossible in HTML5. Flash is not practical for mobile or touch, but it can be for desktop, however it should only be used in situations where there is no other alternative to achieve a given result.

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post #12 of 47
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post
Search giant Google added another board to Flash's coffin on Tuesday with the announcement that it would warn users searching from mobile devices
 

 

Here’s an idea: REMOVE websites that use Flash from the search results entirely. When these companies start going bankrupt because half the population isn’t visiting them, they’ll learn how to move to the 21st century.

 
...when the contents of a search result were “mostly Flash.” 

 

CREATOR: gd-jpeg v1.0 (using IJG JPEG v62), quality = 90

post #13 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by mpantone View Post

It doesn't say "mostly Flash" on the search page. It says "mostly Flash" in the Google blog entry explaining the change:

 

http://googlewebmastercentral.blogspot.com/2014/07/promoting-modern-websites-for-modern.html

 

My guess is that Google's web crawler and search database processing algorithms can tell whether or not an alternate non-Flash content type is available for any given page, just as the hosting site figures out to serve up that content when it encounters a client browser that does not have Flash capability.

 

Note that the search result page doesn't prevent the searcher from going to the page, it's just a warning that the page may not function on the device in question. What is the threshold? Who knows? It's not like Google would explain in detail how their proprietary search algorithm works, and it's not relevant anyhow for the end user.

Google is pretty smart so I suspect you are correct about them knowing there is an alternate page, however that in itself, is a major change for Google because previously the bot would never execute any Javascript for concern of being attacked or trapped in a loop.

 

But until we learn more I would still be interested to know the threshold as it could be relevant to both the end user and also to the developer who would probably like to know if they need to make changes to existing pages. It is especially important to commercial entities if the short description in the results gets removed when the page could be mostly useable on iOS regardless of the Flash content.

 

I just tested it and it is apparently not in effect yet for my area. A lot of our associate companies still use Flash in their websites, so I tested a search for a page I knew was all Flash and Google did not prompt that message in the results. We have alternate content for all but a very few instances of Flash in our various websites, so personally, I'm not concerned about our stuff. The only places we still rely on Flash is inside our Continuing Education sites where it is used strictly for complex animations.

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post #14 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacBook Pro View Post

Another indication of Google Android proponents disconnect with reality; support for the supposedly open Google Android and support for proprietary Adobe Flash.

 

I don't see that the way you do. If I happen to prefer an "open" product for a certain application (operating system, graphics subsystem, whatever), I can still prefer another product that isn't "open" for other applications without being a hypocrite. Maybe there's no decent open alternative. Maybe deliverables are overwhelmingly based on a certain proprietary technology. Maybe the interface is just better suited to my preferred way of doing things.

 

One's preferences may differ depending on the application. Besides, real-world factors make it a hassle to be a total evangelist!

 

For the record, I choose iOS because I don't wanna manage security myself and prefer to have my garden walled. I can see why others may feel differently, though, particularly when it comes to Flash. For better or worse, there's still a ton of stuff out there that's inaccessible without it.

Lorin Schultz (formerly V5V)

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V5V Digital Media, Vancouver, BC Canada

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post #15 of 47
I wish Hulu would stop using f'ing flash.
post #16 of 47
If I could speak to Steve now I'd only ask him one question:

"Have you got this weeks lottery numbers?"

He is, was and always will be way ahead of his time. RIP Steve. X
post #17 of 47

So what to do?

Can I scrap this monster (Flash) off my computer, and still get ALL videos off the net? Not just YouTube- all.

I do have Safari extension Click To Flash installed. Does such allow me to jump Flash from computer.

I am able to download any YouTube video directly so I can then transfer it to iTunes or save a copy on another HD; but cannot save vids from other sites though I can usually find their efforts on YouTube.

YouTube is the one diamond that I appreciate from Google. (Even this warning from Google seems a step in the right direction and maybe a second diamond.) 

I just do not want to lose any capabilities to download and store videos; but I would like to get rid of Flash, once and for all.

Cheers and thanks for any recommendations. 

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post #18 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lorin Schultz View Post

I don't see that the way you do. If I happen to prefer an "open" product for a certain application (operating system, graphics subsystem, whatever), I can still prefer another product that isn't "open" for other applications without being a hypocrite. Maybe there's no decent open alternative. Maybe deliverables are overwhelmingly based on a certain proprietary technology. Maybe the interface is just better suited to my preferred way of doing things.

One's preferences may differ depending on the application. Besides, real-world factors make it a hassle to be a total evangelist!

For the record, I choose iOS because I don't wanna manage security myself and prefer to have my garden walled. I can see why others may feel differently, though, particularly when it comes to Flash. For better or worse, there's still a ton of stuff out there that's inaccessible without it.

You don't know how I "see" that.

The issue I have is with sycophants who mindlessly chant their religious mantra of "open source" but ignore or even refute the fact that a significant portion of (the basis for) Apple OS X is open source.
post #19 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacBook Pro View Post

No. The death of Adobe Flash should be attributed almost singularly to Apple. Google Android proponents derided the lack of Adobe Flash support on Apple iPhones for years before finally accepting reality. Another indication of Google Android proponents disconnect with reality; support for the supposedly open Google Android and support for proprietary Adobe Flash.

Yes, they did deride Apple because it presented a mild competitive advantage for Android. It took a while, but eventually most have come around to Steve's point of view on Flash. And that's the difference between those who accept convention and those who think different and are disciplined and courageous enough to see their vision through.

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post #20 of 47
Originally Posted by mhikl View Post
Can I scrap this monster (Flash) off my computer, and still get ALL videos off the net? Not just YouTube- all.

 

Of course not ALL. Many–perhaps even most–but not all.

 

You know, thinking about Flash still existing on the Internet so many years after the iPhone has exploded in popularity, use share, and how Flash’s iniquity has been shown to all platforms (and with HTML5 doing nigh everything it does), I have to wonder if the reason Flash is still used in such scope is porn.


You know, the same industry that led VHS and Blu-ray to victory.

post #21 of 47
Flash is only good for this:

http://www.fat-pie.com/

And this:

http://homestarrunner.com/
post #22 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

I have to wonder if the reason Flash is still used in such scope is porn.

I'd say it's a mix of DRM and the encoding tools. Some sites stream movies down and Flash had tools for everything, including custom video player controls. MP4 players didn't always let you skip through a movie until it had loaded.

I don't know why Apple didn't provide the tools when they launched the iPhone. They just decided to go HTML 5 with no HTML 5 authoring software, no streaming server software, no video formats decided on. The whole licensing issue of MP4 meant a headache with browser support and the open source crowd pushing Ogg Vorbis and Google pushing WebM:

http://yro-beta.slashdot.org/story/07/12/11/1339251/ogg-vorbis--theora-language-removed-from-html5-spec
http://rudd-o.com/monopolies-of-the-mind/removal-of-ogg-vorbis-and-theora-from-html5-an-outrageous-disaster

On top of that, Flash had all sorts of effects for full page video zooming, which was used in movie trailer sites. Because it was controlled entirely by Adobe, they could do whatever features they wanted but HTML 5 had to wait on all the browsers being updated.

HTML 5 might have been better as a browser plugin that got updated every time the browser opens in the background with the browser itself sticking to basic rendering but it still requires all the browser developers to play along.
post #23 of 47

Facebook, CNN, Hulu and others... take note. It's 2014. It's time to drop Flash like a bad habit.

post #24 of 47
Originally Posted by dysamoria View Post


And even then you can go to its wiki, directly download the FLV, and play it with the Flash Projector instead of letting websites see you have Flash installed.

post #25 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacBook Pro View Post

No. The death of Adobe Flash should be attributed almost singularly to Apple. Google Android proponents derided the lack of Adobe Flash support on Apple iPhones for years before finally accepting reality. Another indication of Google Android proponents disconnect with reality; support for the supposedly open Google Android and support for proprietary Adobe Flash.
No the death of flash must be attributed entirely to Adobe turning it into a video player instead of just leaving it as a portable vector graphics/animation format. Flash is going to die of natural causes due to h.265 and 4K/8K UHD video anyway. The vector animation was basically left unmaintained, and when you scale flash from the typical 320x240 sizes they were designed for to 720p, 1080p and 2160p, the gradients start looking very weird, and the precision of where objects are placed gets less and less. Yet, converting a flash animation to h.264/h.265 completely destroys the smooth shapes and gradients.

"mostly flash" sites rarely are vector animation sites, rather they are sites where the flash bits are used for video/slideshows, both which can be done with less effort using HTML5, which was Steve Job's entire point. Flash is heavily misused. You can convert Adobe Flash/Air projects into apps that use the AIR runtime on iOS if it really needs to be flash. But this is unusable for those who wish to share vector animations. And no, you can not convert flash to SVG, because part of the point of flash is that it's a zlib compressed binary format that has all the music, sound, shapes in one file, and plays back exactly the same on every device. SVG doesn't do any of this. Safari, MSIE and Firefox don't even render the same SVG identical.
post #26 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by Misa View Post
 
The vector animation was basically left unmaintained, and when you scale flash from the typical 320x240 sizes they were designed for to 720p, 1080p and 2160p, the gradients start looking very weird, and the precision of where objects are placed gets less and less. Yet, converting a flash animation to h.264/h.265 completely destroys the smooth shapes and gradients.

Flash export to QuickTime works fine, but you need to know how to configure the settings and it is best to have your frame rate doubled first. Personally I use png sequences because then every frame is pristine.

 

Importing swf into AfterEffects is another fantastic way to leverage the power and ease of use of Flash to get quality animations into video. So many TV commercials are made this way. 

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post #27 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacBook Pro View Post

You don't know how I "see" that.

 

Sorry if I misunderstood. I meant no offence.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by MacBook Pro View Post

The issue I have is with sycophants who mindlessly chant their religious mantra of "open source" but ignore or even refute the fact that a significant portion of (the basis for) Apple OS X is open source.

 

I'm not a developer, but I'm inclined to agree that making an "open source" argument for OS X because it's built on Unix (and other historic open source projects like Squirrel et al) may be a bit of a stretch. Its origins and what it is now are two entirely different things, no? It's like saying Hip-Hip is Country since that's where those chord structures began.

 

Lorin Schultz (formerly V5V)

Audio Engineer

V5V Digital Media, Vancouver, BC Canada

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post #28 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lorin Schultz View Post

Sorry if I misunderstood. I meant no offence.


I'm not a developer, but I'm inclined to agree that making an "open source" argument for OS X because it's built on Unix (and other historic open source projects like Squirrel et al) may be a bit of a stretch. Its origins and what it is now are two entirely different things, no? It's like saying Hip-Hip is Country since that's where those chord structures began.


Not only is Apple OS X a direct descendant of NeXTSTEP through the OPENSTEP lineage but Apple OS X is based on the Mach kernel and BSD components. Furthermore, Apple continues to contribute considerable effort to the open source community rather than pretending to be open source when they aren't really.

OpenCL
Grand Central Dispatch
Edited by MacBook Pro - 7/15/14 at 5:22pm
post #29 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacBook Pro View Post

Not only is Apple OS X a direct descendant of NeXTSTEP through the OPENSTEP lineage but Apple OS X is based on the Mach kernel and BSD components. Furthermore, Apple continues to contribute considerable effort to the open source community rather than pretending to be open source when they aren't really.

OpenCL
Grand Central Dispatch

You're not doing a very good job arguing against the “sycophants”. Not even the most sweaty neckbeard of an Android fanboy would dispute that Apple's operating system is based on open source software at some level. What they find value in is the ability to build their own operating system from the Android source code, something that isn't even remotely possible for iOS or OS X.
post #30 of 47

I have a Galaxy 4 I have been given to connect to my work Exchange server, but I don't have any actual Google searches that would demonstrate how this actually works on an Android.  I'd assume I should see the same message on Android 4.x since it also doesn't support Flash?  Or did we forget that little fact?

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by wakefinance View Post

What they find value in is the ability to build their own operating system from the Android source code, something that isn't even remotely possible for iOS or OS X.

 

Sorry, but I'm calling bullshit on this.  The Android you could potential build from source is a ghetto.  There's no Samsung bits, there's no Google Play bits, all of the AOSP apps you can build are basically abandonware on the part of Google.

   Apple develops an improved programming language.  Google copied Java.  Everything you need to know, right there.

 

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post #31 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by John.B View Post

Sorry, but I'm calling bullshit on this.  The Android you could potential build from source is a ghetto.  There's no Samsung bits, there's no Google Play bits, all of the AOSP apps you can build are basically abandonware on the part of Google.

I don't disagree, but that doesn't change the fact that that freedom is the source of value for developers and custom ROM enthusiasts. Not to mention it's apparently quite easy to make the operating system function normally since every custom build I've ever seen supports the Play Store and Play Services.
post #32 of 47
How can I get this warning enabled on my Mac browser where I've un-installed flash for security reasons? It's as much of an annoyance to me on the desktop as it is on mobile platforms.
post #33 of 47
Originally Posted by scooper4711 View Post
How can I get this warning enabled on my Mac browser where I've un-installed flash for security reasons?

 

If you’ve uninstalled Flash, why does it matter? It can’t attack what it isn’t installed on.

post #34 of 47
Flash is dying. This may speed the process up.

Yet, there still are lots of mostly-Flash websites around. Worse, some new Flash designs are still being created.

The trouble is, all those Flash developers have known this for quite some time, but
- Flash is their livelihood, because this is what they know best
- They trick their clients into accepting heavily Flash-based web site designs, knowing that at some point they will be asked for an entire Flash-free site overhaul, due to declining site visits as Flash dies faster and faster. They believe Flash is their insurance for the near future.

My take: hopefully those clients will see the light and ask someone else to redo their website.
Edited by VanFruniken - 7/16/14 at 1:30am
post #35 of 47
I'm a Graphic Designer and have used Adobe Flash since version 2 to create animations for the web, CD's, cartoons, interactive stories and even exported Flash content to uncompressed QuickTime video and had my 9 minute 45 second cartoon animation in the Dusty film festival at the famous Ziegfeld Theater in Manhattan.

I do not deny that Adobe Flash does not work on IOS devices and has security flaws due to Adobe, but many people do not realize that Adobe Flash was used to create many of the most popular iOS games on the market. Angry Birds and Candy Crush were BOTH created using Adobe Flash, and then ported over and programmed in another language like Objective C, but many ppl do not want to admit this. I have a friend at Comedy Central who uses Adobe Flash EVERY day to illustrate in and create vector animations used on TV on Comedy Central and the Cartoon Network. Flash can export to video which is then used in Final Cut or Avid. You can use Flash vector graphics in Adobe Illustrator or Adobe Photoshop to be used in professional print as well or even use vector from Flash in Maya to be rendered in 3d.

The fact of the matter is, Flash is not going away. It is a vector based drawing tool. The SWF file format however is becoming obsolete which is Adobe Flash's default export file format. Flash CS6 with a plugin and the latest version of Adobe Flash CC can export to the HTML5 format. Flash CC will take a Flash vector animation programmed in ActionScript and convert it to HTML5 and JavaScript. Designers DO NOT need to have to program their artwork, but simply design visually. They can create vector and raster animations like they have for years and then export the finished animation in not SWF, but HTML5.

HTML5 is still in its infancy however and is limiting and messy. It requires folders, images, JavaScript files sometimes a minimum of 10 files for just 1 SWF self contained file. HTML5 does not allow (yet) many of the filters the SWF file format does and the files are much larger than SWF files. I did a test in Flash CS6 and exported a complex vector animation from Flash in both SWF and HTML5. The SWF file was 140kb while the HTML5 file was about 10MB and played slowly. HTML5 is not optimized yet and is more demanding on mobile devices.
post #36 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by JeffT2 View Post

I'm a Graphic Designer and have used Adobe Flash since version 2 to create animations for the web, CD's, cartoons, interactive stories and even exported Flash content to uncompressed QuickTime video and had my 9 minute 45 second cartoon animation in the Dusty film festival at the famous Ziegfeld Theater in Manhattan.

That reminded me that font rendering used to be one of the important uses for Flash as well as multiple browser uploads. Font support varies between different browsers:

http://webfonts.info/node/379
Quote:
Originally Posted by JeffT2 View Post

Adobe Flash was used to create many of the most popular iOS games on the market. Angry Birds and Candy Crush were BOTH created using Adobe Flash, and then ported over and programmed in another language like Objective C, but many ppl do not want to admit this. I have a friend at Comedy Central who uses Adobe Flash EVERY day to illustrate in and create vector animations used on TV on Comedy Central and the Cartoon Network. Flash can export to video which is then used in Final Cut or Avid. You can use Flash vector graphics in Adobe Illustrator or Adobe Photoshop to be used in professional print as well or even use vector from Flash in Maya to be rendered in 3d.

The fact of the matter is, Flash is not going away. It is a vector based drawing tool.

There will always be a need for a vector animation app. I think it would be good if Adobe added animation features to Illustrator and brought the two together so there's no intermediates between Flash and Illustrator and it would help if they retired Actionscript in favor of Javascript with the same API. After Effects and Unity use Javascript. That could help exporting to the web.

Some fairly large games have been developed in Flash such as Deponia:

http://www.flashgamesnexus.com/flash-games/Deponia.php

This is on the Mac/PC already and is being ported to iOS ( http://www.digitalspy.co.uk/gaming/news/a558602/deponia-for-ps3-and-ios-as-daedalic-branches-out-from-pc-gdc-2014.html ). Some Flash games were ported to HTML 5:

http://chrome.angrybirds.com

but the developers mentioned there were some hurdles with Javascript and they had to develop their own preloaders like this one for the HTML 5 version of Cut the Rope:

http://thinkpixellab.com/pxloader/

There were also issues with drawing loops and idling the game when there were no updates. There's also the issue of content protection. Extracting assets from a Flash file is harder than from HTML 5. I don't think web publishing is right for games at all though, native apps are much better as they save game state better and don't have to download assets on each play.
Quote:
Originally Posted by JeffT2 View Post

HTML5 is still in its infancy however and is limiting and messy. It requires folders, images, JavaScript files sometimes a minimum of 10 files for just 1 SWF self contained file. HTML5 does not allow (yet) many of the filters the SWF file format does and the files are much larger than SWF files. I did a test in Flash CS6 and exported a complex vector animation from Flash in both SWF and HTML5. The SWF file was 140kb while the HTML5 file was about 10MB and played slowly. HTML5 is not optimized yet and is more demanding on mobile devices.

The Flash plugin has the advantage of being a custom runtime that they can do anything with so any kind of motion tweening, motion blur is easier. With the Canvas element though, there shouldn't need to be a size difference between what's in Flash and what's in HTML 5 but conversions from one to the other will involve flattening some things or exporting multiple objects in full vs being created at run-time.

When it comes to performance, HTML 5 has the benefit that hardware acceleration support is no longer controlled by Adobe. That was a huge hurdle for Flash on mobile because there are so many devices. There was no way they could ensure that every processor would get full support.

WebGL has also gone beyond what Flash was capable of without the need for the plugin.

Flash filled a need for rich content when competing browsers couldn't agree on standards. Youtube wouldn't have existed without Flash. It's clear that it wasn't right for the web long-term though. Search engines couldn't index the content and there's very little segmentation of content so browsers just have to load entire .swf files. It also puts the authoring and playback of rich web content entirely in the hands of one company. HTML 5 makes authoring and playback accessible to everyone.

HTML 5 is far from perfect but it's the right way to go and it will erode the use of 3rd party plugins the more features it gets. Vector animation software won't go away and Flash for the web only existed because of the slowness of browser development. Browser developers deserve more blame for holding back rich content from the web than Flash does for delivering it.

Going forward, I don't see web apps taking off. Mobile apps have shown that people want a controlled App Store and offline apps. HTML 5 will gradually fill in the uses for video, advertising, fonts and general online content but it would move faster if there were better tools to deliver it. Flash will focus on offline vector animation, which is much more respectable than the reputation it gets from the Flash plugin.
post #37 of 47

But...but...Google is evil!  Why would they do something helpful?  /s

post #38 of 47
"The company goes on to suggest that developers should eschew proprietary formats like Flash in favor of more widely-implemented standards such as HTML5."

Funny, are Google going to warn about HTML 5 web games not working too ! Apple allows 3D for iAds only, not web games.
So is iAds the new Flash for IOS?
post #39 of 47
I thought Android doesn't have Flash now as well and Adobe abandoned Flash on mobile devices like 2 years ago. No?
post #40 of 47
My humble take on this, for simple applications HTML5 is a good replacement. For complex applications, the Unreal Engine packs incredible power and can export to most platforms on the market, and it uses C++ and/or blueprints, which makes it incredibly better than Flash, and offers a huge amount of trained, high-performance developers.

Social Capitalist, dreamer and wise enough to know I'm never going to grow up anyway... so not trying anymore.

 

http://m.ign.com/articles/2014/07/16/7-high-school-girls-are-kickstarting-their-awa...

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Social Capitalist, dreamer and wise enough to know I'm never going to grow up anyway... so not trying anymore.

 

http://m.ign.com/articles/2014/07/16/7-high-school-girls-are-kickstarting-their-awa...

Reply
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