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Flir One case turns Apple's iPhone into a high-end thermal imaging camera

post #1 of 27
Thread Starter 
Thermal imaging company Flir has announced that pre-orders for its new One iPhone case -- which will let outdoorsmen, HVAC contractors, and people who simply like to see how hot things are convert their iPhone 5 or 5s into a thermal camera -- will begin Wednesday, with the device coming to Apple retail stores in August.




The Flir One will offer users the ability to view live infrared imagery when paired with a companion app, and the company imagines a variety of uses for the accessory, ranging from home improvement to security. Flir hopes the One's relatively modest $349.99 price tag -- a significant discount from the company's other cameras, which can run into the tens of thousands of dollars -- will inspire even more creative applications.

"Based on technology that was formerly reserved for the military, Flir One is the first in a new generation of affordable thermal imaging devices designed to inspire imaginative and innovative uses by consumers," Flir Chief Executive Andy Teich said in a release. "This represents a revolutionary step forward for both Flir Systems and thermal imaging."

Homeowners could use the Flir One to find and fix air leaks to make their home more energy efficient without needing to hire outside contractors, for instance, or campers could use the camera to observe nocturnal creatures. The Flir app also allows for the creation of time-lapse and panoramic thermal images.

Flir will begin accepting pre-orders in the U.S. on July 23 at 9 a.m. Eastern Time at flir.com//flirone. The camera will make its way to Europe as well as Apple retail outlets in the U.S. and Canada in August.
post #2 of 27

Been waiting for this to come out when they announced it last year. Will be picking one up for sure. For automotive/racing use they are fantastic. I just couldn't justify spending a couple thousand for one.

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post #3 of 27
Won't this just make everything look like a ghost or Sasquatch?

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
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"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
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post #4 of 27

I use to use Flir products for a long time, I first used and IR system for finding hit spots on electronics back in the 1980's it was made by Huges, then I move to Flir, their systems was the better because of the software, they have really good real time and post processing capabilities.

 

It is amazing what they can cram into a small package. They use to require LN2 to keep the detector cool, then a cyro-pump. The IR sensors must have gotten so go they the can work at room temperatures.

 

I wonder how much memory the program uses on an iphone.

post #5 of 27
Here's what I have to say about this... Shut up and take my money!
post #6 of 27

It's actually an ultra-low end thermal camera. 80x60 pixels. Normal low-end cameras are 160x128 and commercial ones go as high as 640x480. The normal mode for this camera is to enhance the resolution by overlaying a visible image onto the thermal one.

post #7 of 27

Perfect for data center use. Scan the racks to find any machines that are running hot, probably dead fans. Also for scanning PDUs to see if they are overloaded. or have hot cables. We had a 440V cable melt one time. With something like this we could have been keeping records and would have noticed a spike in heat in advance of complete failure..

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post #8 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by konqerror View Post

It's actually an ultra-low end thermal camera. 80x60 pixels. Normal low-end cameras are 160x128 and commercial ones go as high as 640x480. The normal mode for this camera is to enhance the resolution by overlaying a visible image onto the thermal one.

Whatever the resolution might be, it's more than sufficient. What it does, seems pretty sophisticated. The price is unbeatable. I've used far more expensive devices. The features they have are not required most of the time, and the extra resolution serves little purpose most of the time either. This is perfect for the purposes it's been designed for.

The only problem is that it's designed for the older devices. By the time it's available, Apple's new models will be out. I really would like to buy this, as I've got a number of uses for it. But I don't want to keep my iPhone 5 in order to do that, as I'm planning to buy a new phone in December.
post #9 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Suddenly Newton View Post

Won't this just make everything look like a ghost or Sasquatch?

 

You say this as if it's a bad thing - I see the new market (courtesy of Rule 34): Hot Thermal Imaging Action :)

post #10 of 27

Does it do video (Terminator vision clips!) or just stills....?

An iPhone, a Leatherman and thou...  ...life is complete.

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An iPhone, a Leatherman and thou...  ...life is complete.

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post #11 of 27
A Flir One plus a pistol might be the end of our gopher problems.

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post #12 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by jd_in_sb View Post

A Flir One plus a pistol might be the end of our gopher problems.

 

Nah. A small tractor pulling tank of water from hole-to-hole is what you need.

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post #13 of 27
Great! I'd like to use immediately on my MacBook Pro MagSafe connector and send the pic to Apple. It's often hot enough to cause 2nd degree burns.
post #14 of 27
post #15 of 27
Can't wait to get one of these. My brothers work recently bought a flir for 15,000 dollars. A couple months later one of the female directors wanted an investigation into why funds were wasted on the flir instead of downloading the .99 thermal image app in the App Store like her little son did.
post #16 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by dancxg View Post

Can't wait to get one of these. My brothers work recently bought a flir for 15,000 dollars. A couple months later one of the female directors wanted an investigation into why funds were wasted on the flir instead of downloading the .99 thermal image app in the App Store like her little son did.
If she is so clueless as to even attempt to question the difference between a $15,000 piece of specialty equipment to a $0.99 iOS app, she needs to be thrown out on her ass.
post #17 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by MagMan1979 View Post

If she is so clueless as to even attempt to question the difference between a $15,000 piece of specialty equipment to a $0.99 iOS app, she needs to be thrown out on her ass.

It's a large research hospital, my brother is a director also. He was forced to set up a demonstration/test since she had gotten everyone worked up about it and filed a formal complaint for fraud/waste/abuse. In the end she looked like a fool. He still laughs about it.
post #18 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by dancxg View Post

Can't wait to get one of these. My brothers work recently bought a flir for 15,000 dollars. A couple months later one of the female directors wanted an investigation into why funds were wasted on the flir instead of downloading the .99 thermal image app in the App Store like her little son did.

There is a huge difference. The original cameras were closer to $30k from Flir. Some were $60k. They had /have specialty courses to actually get certified on how to read and Interpret the results. You can't seriously think there's any parallel between a .99 app for a phone that does not have thermal imaging capability to one that was specifically designed for it.

There's a .99 app on the App Store that will find ghosts too! Yea, it's amazing! They're really there!

Just to throw it out there, If you own and are certified to use a Flir camera you can bill yourself out (with the camera) for around $2,000 per hour depending on the client.

I call bull sh:t on the .99 app scenario unless the entire group involved are/were extremely mentally challenged. I have seen organizations buy one after they have used someone else's services and had their employees sent to the classes required to operate them.

Don't get your hopes up for buying the item mentioned and billing yourself out either. It's meant more for recreation.
post #19 of 27
It happened. The hospital is funded partially by the state. All kinds if non-sense happens there. She was against the purchase and made a huge ordeal, she left a short time after. The people she had gotten on her side were older and had no idea what was true or not.
post #20 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by dancxg View Post

It happened. The hospital is funded partially by the state. All kinds if non-sense happens there. She was against the purchase and made a huge ordeal, she left a short time after. The people she had gotten on her side were older and had no idea what was true or not.

Every hospital should own a Flir camera or an equivalent. Being able to look at electrical gear - transformers, panels, battery backup systems, capacitors (you get charged for your largest electrical load, a capacitor will drop your load requirements and lower the bill) and understanding if they are overloaded is very important. I'm not even the electrical industry. My card says "Material Sciences". Nice sounding I suppose. I test everything basically.

Throw one of those supposed iPhone screens my way and I can tell you the exact chemical makeup. I'd put it through a few more tests than a "Jack knife" and sandpaper!
post #21 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Silver Shadow View Post

Every hospital should own a Flir camera or an equivalent.

Agreed, for medical purposes it can be used to diagnose broken joints/inflammation.
Quote:
...capacitors (you get charged for your largest electrical load, a capacitor will drop your load requirements and lower the bill)

Sorry what?
post #22 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Elijahg View Post



Agreed, for medical purposes it can be used to diagnose broken joints/inflammation.
Sorry what?

It's not something that would help a residential unit. Not much at least. They're generally installed commercially to supplement the draw when multiple HVAC units, large motors and other items all power up at once. It may be a regional topic, however every region I've seen so far does charge a premium for large draws on the grid. Large draws play havoc with load balancing and are the most common occurrences of spikes and surges large and small.

If you would like to do some reading.

https://www.eaton.com/Eaton/ProductsServices/Electrical/ProductsandServices/PowerQualityandMonitoring/PowerFactorCorrection/index.htm

There are many manufacturers that make them,
post #23 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Silver Shadow View Post


It's not something that would help a residential unit. Not much at least. They're generally installed commercially to supplement the draw when multiple HVAC units, large motors and other items all power up at once. It may be a regional topic, however every region I've seen so far does charge a premium for large draws on the grid.

 

Power factor is a steady-state phenomenon. It happens because things like motors and transformers look like inductors electrically. Demand charges is something separate and is typically averaged over 15 minutes, a capacitor would have no effect. Cutting your peak draw is called peak shaving and the traditional way is to fire up your own diesel generator, but they have flywheels and some esoteric battery technologies instead now.

post #24 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by konqerror View Post

Power factor is a steady-state phenomenon. It happens because things like motors and transformers look like inductors electrically. Demand charges is something separate and is typically averaged over 15 minutes, a capacitor would have no effect. Cutting your peak draw is called peak shaving and the traditional way is to fire up your own diesel generator, but they have flywheels and some esoteric battery technologies instead now.

No. Load leveling has been around for quite some time now. When engineering new buildings this is taken into consideration and capacitors are installed to limit the peak load draw.

You don't have to "fire up a generator" if you install sufficient capacitors. They bear the brunt of the load so to speak. You are obviously not in the electrical industry.
post #25 of 27
Am i the only one who's concerned of the potential for this device to aid criminals? For ex: break ins, etc??
post #26 of 27

I received my Flir-One on Friday, August 15, 2014. I have tested it under differing circumstances inside and outside my home. The thermal imager has a resolution of 80x60 which is far too limited to identify fine details. It is good for looking for leaks in walls, finding out where you dog peed in the carpet last night, and if there are any small animals living in your garage (yep, I found the little bugger last night). 

 

I have also identified several hot spots in the electronics in my house and found that the power panel has a hot spot where the ground fault protected circuit breaker is.

 

 

The main reason for getting this unit was to find hot spots in computers, server, and in other equipment related to them. Even when in sleep mode computers continue to consume significant power.

 

I wish the Flir-One software didn't watermark the image as seen in the image above, but it is fairly unobtrusive. 

 

I am not concerned with criminals using this device because of it's low resolution. There are stand-alone products that can be obtained, legally or not, that would do a much better job of imaging people. IR Thermal radiation does not penetrate glass and walls will block most of it. "Seeing" people behind walls requires MUCH more expensive equipment, like $5,000 and up. 

post #27 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by jayweiss View Post
 

I wish the Flir-One software didn't watermark the image as seen in the image above, but it is fairly unobtrusive. 

 

FLIR stuff always has the logo on it. The only way to ever get a FLIR product without a logo (without voiding the warranty) is to order 1,000 OEM cores in one go.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post

Whatever the resolution might be, it's more than sufficient. 

The image shows exactly what I was saying: it's a ultra-low res image that's pretty useless without the visible edge overlay. If you didn't have that, you'd have no idea what we're looking at. This means this product is fine for finding leaks and faulty cables, but worthless for night vision. Even the 320x240 cameras can be tricky to use because of the different effects (contrast mechanisms) in the infrared.


Edited by konqerror - 8/18/14 at 2:25am
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