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Apple reportedly working with Swatch, other watchmakers to roll out multiple 'iWatch' devices - Page 3

post #81 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maestro64 View Post
 

Well maybe is doing the car play approach, develop a set of tool and they work with the world manufactures to implement them into their designs. This way Apple does not need to be a watch expert but work with the experts and provide them the tools which allows the watch to work with apple ecosystem and product offering.

 

This could be a much better approach than them making a watch, they could do their own design but they may allow everyone else to do the heavy lifting.

 

I think someone earlier on this thread suggested the same thing. There is a certain logic to doing a carplay approach. Like you say, Apple doesn't need to be a watch (or car) manufacturer, and can extend the eco-system through many more outlets than it otherwise could do on its own. Not to say that Apple couldn't still offer its own iWatch (or whatever the "wearable" would be called), but this also provides a way to bring the technology to market in a variety of styles that don't necessarily line up with the Apple design aesthetic (personally, I do prefer minimalism and would hope that Apple does indeed offer its own product).

 

edit:  Never mind the fact that the other AI article says Swatch is denying any involvement... :???:


Edited by RoundaboutNow - 7/24/14 at 9:50am

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post #82 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by mjtomlin View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by RoundaboutNow View Post
 

 

Ah yes, Luxvue. Here is the AI article:

http://appleinsider.com/articles/14/05/02/apple-acquires-luxvue-a-power-efficient-micro-led-maker---report

 

There are some really informative comments following the article, especially from Dick Applebaum.

 

I was reading up on SOS (Silicon on Sapphire) and one of the current leading companies using this technique is a company called, Peregrine Semiconductor in San Diego. In fact the company was tapped for producing an antenna switch in the iPhone 4S' dual-antenna design. However it was dropped with the release of the 5C and 5S, causing their stock to plunge.

 

Possibly a good opportunity for Apple to acquire them?

 

======

 

After reading a little about SOS, and taking into account all the sapphire Apple is buying up, I'm really beginning to wonder if Apple is producing the A8 using an SOS fabrication process? It seems that very few others make use of it in microprocessors because it is considered to be fairly expensive (the sapphire). But the properties of using such a process would allow processors to use a lot less power and run much, much faster.

 

A8 with SOS? That would surprise me. Maybe A9 or later...

 

If the Luxvue micro-LED tech is far enough along in its development cycle, it sure would help make a splash if it showed up in an Apple wearable.

 

I think micro LED has a better chance of being used sooner, but you never know!

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post #83 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by EricTheHalfBee View Post
 

I don't think this is that far fetched. A lot of watch companies buy their "movements" (the actual internal workings of the watch) from other suppliers and then put the movement into their own case/band.

 

The iWatch could be nothing more than a movement that Apple makes available which has the processor, circuitry and display (perhaps a couple basic sizes) that watch companies then put into their own custom case/band.

 

I simply don't think a standard one-size-fits-all iWatch would take off. There's a reason why there are literally thousands of watch styles - people like to have choice. Your watch reflects your style as much as it's used to tell time.

 

Having an Apple movement would mean that the functionality of every iWatch would be consistent and under Apple control while still allowing watch makers the freedom to continue making a wide variety of styles.

I agree, though I'd take it further: Several things have made me doubt the existence of an "iWatch" at all. The size of the display (too small), the life of the battery (too short) and the style choices (too few) for an expensive item in a style-led market. Will people give up the fashion/lifestyle/wealth statement that these pricey baubles apparently represent? Then there's the added-value over the iPhone that's just a small pull-out-of-pocket away; I can't see who's going to buy it beyond the narrow techno community. But if you consider it as most likely a set of sensors and a very sub-functional (compared to the iPhone's touchscreen) set of controls/alerts...

 

So suppose it's not a complete iWatch at all, as you said. Suppose it's more like CarPlay, where GM, or Ford, or BMW make the 'carrier' to an appropriate price/style etc point and Apple adds the smarts? The watch, and its bracelet, can include biometric sensors plus basic iPhone controls including a vibrate or similar alert (maybe Siri too though I'm not sure about the Dick Tracey talk-to-the-wrist bit personally); these all use Bluetooth LE occasionally so don't make big demands on the battery. But what if it has no display either (*shock*), the battery life issues mostly disappear, the watch part has traditional physical hands and/or a low power monochrome LCD allowing all the current style choices. So Apple's contribution looks like a high functionality, heavily integrated power-sipping SoC - which they're getting good at. The loss is those functions that are worth doing on a tiny display rather than making the effort of getting your phone out. Are there really lots of those?

 

This interpretation has the ability to sell to most of the (expensive) watch-buying community, solves the market access and breadth of choice issues and puts Apple in the position of dominating the first-generation of smart wrists.

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post #84 of 89
Swatch would do well to partner with Apple, lest they become the Blackberry of the watch world.
post #85 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard Getz View Post
 

 

 

 

Have you seen this? 

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ndycU_dUHNQ&list=FLKofJkWfHkacPrJmMbcP6-w&index=3 

First that is a cool watch, I have not seen this before, but this exactly what I am talking about. Let the real watch designer do their things and let apple do theirs and in the end we get a great product.

post #86 of 89
 
16.5mm deep?!  That's a monster.

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post #87 of 89
It's the wallet, stupid. Not the watch.
post #88 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by freediverx View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by thrang View Post

If the watch crystal could be invisible to show a traditional, real watch face, and then turn opaque with a full color screen overlay, it would be incredibly interesting...

That would be awesome.


Yeah, this seems the most appealing idea to me. A steampunk hybrid. It can't be too expensive, though, because you'll need a new one every few years.
"If the young are not initiated into the village, they will burn it down just to feel its warmth."
- African proverb
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"If the young are not initiated into the village, they will burn it down just to feel its warmth."
- African proverb
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post #89 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by Command_F View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by EricTheHalfBee View Post

 
I don't think this is that far fetched. A lot of watch companies buy their "movements" (the actual internal workings of the watch) from other suppliers and then put the movement into their own case/band.

The iWatch could be nothing more than a movement that Apple makes available which has the processor, circuitry and display (perhaps a couple basic sizes) that watch companies then put into their own custom case/band.

I simply don't think a standard one-size-fits-all iWatch would take off. There's a reason why there are literally thousands of watch styles - people like to have choice. Your watch reflects your style as much as it's used to tell time.

Having an Apple movement would mean that the functionality of every iWatch would be consistent and under Apple control while still allowing watch makers the freedom to continue making a wide variety of styles.
I agree, though I'd take it further: Several things have made me doubt the existence of an "iWatch" at all. The size of the display (too small), the life of the battery (too short) and the style choices (too few) for an expensive item in a style-led market. Will people give up the fashion/lifestyle/wealth statement that these pricey baubles apparently represent? Then there's the added-value over the iPhone that's just a small pull-out-of-pocket away; I can't see who's going to buy it beyond the narrow techno community. But if you consider it as most likely a set of sensors and a very sub-functional (compared to the iPhone's touchscreen) set of controls/alerts...

So suppose it's not a complete iWatch at all, as you said. Suppose it's more like CarPlay, where GM, or Ford, or BMW make the 'carrier' to an appropriate price/style etc point and Apple adds the smarts? The watch, and its bracelet, can include biometric sensors plus basic iPhone controls including a vibrate or similar alert (maybe Siri too though I'm not sure about the Dick Tracey talk-to-the-wrist bit personally); these all use Bluetooth LE occasionally so don't make big demands on the battery. But what if it has no display either (*shock*), the battery life issues mostly disappear, the watch part has traditional physical hands and/or a low power monochrome LCD allowing all the current style choices. So Apple's contribution looks like a high functionality, heavily integrated power-sipping SoC - which they're getting good at. The loss is those functions that are worth doing on a tiny display rather than making the effort of getting your phone out. Are there really lots of those?

This interpretation has the ability to sell to most of the (expensive) watch-buying community, solves the market access and breadth of choice issues and puts Apple in the position of dominating the first-generation of smart wrists.

I like your thinking. The idea of no display seems sensible. Or perhaps turning the strap into the computer paired with a traditional watch.
"If the young are not initiated into the village, they will burn it down just to feel its warmth."
- African proverb
Reply
"If the young are not initiated into the village, they will burn it down just to feel its warmth."
- African proverb
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