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Apple holds on to top spot in tablet sales despite iPad decline

post #1 of 49
Thread Starter 
The tablet market remains Apple's to lose, according to new data released Thursday, as the Cupertino company commanded almost 27 percent of tablet shipments in the second quarter of 2014 -- nearly 10 percentage points more than rival Samsung, its closest competitor.




South Korean conglomerate Samsung held 17.2 percent of the market, followed by Chinese PC maker Lenovo with 4.9 percent and Taiwanese firms Asus and Acer at 4.6 percent and 2 percent, respectively. Lenovo experienced particularly explosive growth, increasing shipments by 64.7 percent year-over-year, according to the latest estimates from research firm IDC.

The overall market is said to have grown by 11 percent from the year-ago quarter to 49.3 million units. Much of the increase came from smaller tablet makers, IDC said.

"Until recently, Apple, and to a lesser extent Samsung, have been sitting at the top of the market, minimally impacted by the progress from competitors," IDC tablet analyst Jitesh Ubrani said in a release. "Now we are seeing growth amongst the smaller vendors and a leveling of shares across more vendors as the market enters a new phase."

Apple sold just 13.2 million iPads in its own fiscal third quarter, a 9.2 percent year-over-year decline. Company officials said they were not concerned, however, and CEO Tim Cook went as far as to say his company is "very bullish about the future of the tablet market."
post #2 of 49

I'm an Apple person since the old Apple II days.  However, being an IT professional, I had to try all the other flavors of tablets.  Apple just gets it.  No one else understands the tablet metaphor any better than our friends in Cupertino.


Edited by smaceslin - 7/24/14 at 10:45am
post #3 of 49
Tablets are the future for most personal computing (and a lot of work computing too). We've known that since "a big iPhone" was first imagined.

But conventional computers will still have their uses, and Macs are advancing steadily.

What is interesting is to see how the transition happens. At first it seemed it would be a slow shift over many years. Then the iPad took off and it seemed the shift was happening fast. Now tablet sales are slowing (but user base is still growing) and the truth seems somewhere in between.

Complicating factors:

- Tablets stay useful a long time, and aren't subsidized by phone makers. High tablet usage doesn't always mean high repeated sales.

- Many people just use their phones for their primary computing (not just phablets, but that help). In that way, touch can replace a laptop for many tasks and not need a tablet.

- Apple is making it increasingly easy to use a Mac and iOS device(s) together. (Together in the right way! Not a la Microsoft.)

The iPad will eat most of the Mac market (never all!) but it looks to be a slow transition. What about the larger market? Android seems to be claiming the "dumb video player" market worldwide, and the rest leans heavily to Apple. Enterprise? Microsoft wants it. They have a tough road, but they have a chance.
post #4 of 49

I agree that iPads are not going to have the regular, subsidized upgrade cycle like the iPhones (all phones, actually) do every 2 years.

 

It will be much more like desktops/laptops which tended to get upgraded every 5 years or so.

 

So, what you'll see over  time is a slower long term growth in iPads as more and more people who don't have one decide to buy it for the first time. And as the older iPads get long in the tooth, have smaller memory sizes, slower processing, lack of multitasking and other advances, the older iPads will be upgraded to whatever new iPad is available. Just like laptops and desktops.

 

The IBM deal with the Enterprise market, plus the Education market, will add to that long-term growth.

post #5 of 49

The day I can drop my iPad in a charging stand and at that point operate it with a keyboard (inc the use of CMD-Tab), and a mouse it will become a LOT more useful and speedy as a laptop replacement. Not sure it will ever happen because the mbAir is still so awesome. I feel spoilt for choice to be honest and I am pretty damn happy with my mix of devices at this moment.

post #6 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by paxman View Post
 

The day I can drop my iPad in a charging stand and at that point operate it with a keyboard (inc the use of CMD-Tab), and a mouse it will become a LOT more useful and speedy as a laptop replacement. Not sure it will ever happen because the mbAir is still so awesome. I feel spoilt for choice to be honest and I am pretty damn happy with my mix of devices at this moment.


You could always opt for a Surface Pro 3.

post #7 of 49

HOT DAMN!

 

Others must make an amazing tablet! Domination.

 

No way on this green earth did Samsung sell 8.5 million tablets.  They probably ship 8.5 million and 6 months later 7 million are returned when the new model comes out.

 

The numbers just don't jive.  According to IDC's numbers Samsung has sold more tablets and smartphones this year than last year.  Yet Samsung is showing 25% decrease in profits.  How is that possible?  Because IDC is full of sheet.

post #8 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by CanukStorm View Post


You could always opt for a Surface Pro 3.
Then again, the Mac book air is far superior
post #9 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trubador View Post
 

I agree that iPads are not going to have the regular, subsidized upgrade cycle like the iPhones (all phones, actually) do every 2 years.

 

It will be much more like desktops/laptops which tended to get upgraded every 5 years or so.

 

So, what you'll see over  time is a slower long term growth in iPads as more and more people who don't have one decide to buy it for the first time. And as the older iPads get long in the tooth, have smaller memory sizes, slower processing, lack of multitasking and other advances, the older iPads will be upgraded to whatever new iPad is available. Just like laptops and desktops.

 

 

The key item with tablets is the interface to the world.   

 

Apple, given their single source model, can support more models backwards, so there is even less 'turns' for SW improvements, but on the other hand, every 3 years there will/could/likely/possibly be a HW integration that is must have.   TouchID I think is key**  and I think that a commercial version of 'wallet' will also be important (not for payment but for proof of self/afiliation....  Watching Wedding Crashers, and I thought that would be a cool app... 'evites' where the RSVP is digitally signed, that only your TouchID can unlock).

 

Other things, such as the M7 chip...  Nothing speak like corporate time and motion studies than replaying what you're doing (I wasn't joking in the other thread that IBM/Apple can help the USPS in determining variance in carrier routing (a little big brother), or providing instant information on  'where' a carrier is' [health/safety, follow-up, custom service ['customer left a big-@ss package for pickup 'HERE' (GPS converted to 11 digit zip code)'].

 

As Apple adds these items to the iPad, and who knows what's next, there will be a 3 year transition.  

 

 
Quote:
The IBM deal with the Enterprise market, plus the Education market, will add to that long-term growth.

or better still contribute to other revenue channels (app store, applecare, other).   I look at the BYOD/Enterprise space and see a huge collision that basically says there won't be a 'home PC' and a a 'work PC'  There will be 'my tablet' in 'work mode' and 'play mode.'   I don't think you'll see a person with 2 iPads, but you will see a person with 'their' iPad take it everywhere (and where it's not, your iPhone is there).

 

 

(TL;DR - why TouchID will make a big difference);

**(but I'm in the Identity Management world.  The key thing about 'home PCs' was... outside of our corporate walls, is that you, or your 12 yo daughter (auto)logging in to the corporate network?  Now we can be sure (more sure), for less money... when I first started out, it was about $200 a year for 'managed' RSA tokens... While today, it's less (more like $50/year... there is a lot of overhead integrating into organizational provisioning systems, even if the fob is $5.  $50 by 80,000 employees (or $100 for 50 employees) is big money for corporations.   Soon  it will be builtin into your iOS VPN app (evaluatePolicy:IDPolicyDeviceOwnerAuthenticationWithBioMetrics), or any iOS app (your sales forecasting tool)... get the biometric, send the AppleID or whatever unlocked to that back to the mothership, bingo... instant multi factor factor authentication... your login into the device (appleID), the device itself (your registered token), and your fingerprint (a success token stored in the Secure Enclave, saying person AppleID's was used on a registered (managed) device, and the only place where that token was, was successfully returned.  

 

That's a couple Billion dollars saved for every financial institution that is skirting the FFIEC laws from 2011 requiring non-replayable real 2 factor authentication (almost all banks are faking it with stored tokens in your browser, making the 'device' the 2nd factor, which just about any malicious hacker can get access to, and the 'ease of use workaround' is a 'mothers maiden name, first school, pet's name   secret'.... just another 'first factor' repeatable shared secret)

post #10 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by sog35 View Post

HOT DAMN!

Others must make an amazing tablet! Domination.

No way on this green earth did Samsung sell 8.5 million tablets.  They probably ship 8.5 million and 6 months later 7 million are returned when the new model comes out.

The numbers just don't jive.  According to IDC's numbers Samsung has sold more tablets and smartphones this year than last year.  Yet Samsung is showing 25% decrease in profits.  How is that possible?  Because IDC is full of sheet.

I haven't looked at their income statement, but a really simple explanation is that their expenses increased more than their revenues did. Samsung may have brought in more revenues than ever, but if they spent even more on R&D or marketing, then their profits would still decline.
post #11 of 49

I find it funny how Apple was a few percentage points off market expectation on a device that WILL see an update in a few months and suddenly it's all doom and gloom. Please. People actually do other things in the summer other than play on their iPad.  We also know that Apple also reports numbers purchased by consumers, not tablets shipped. Hell, Amazon doesn't tell you any information on their devices.

 

Like many have said before, Apple is also a victim of its own success with the device since for many, there's no need to upgrade what they have. Does that mean Android is suddenly winning? Um, no.  Take a look at web usage and you'll see that even Amazon tablets are being used more than Samsung tablets.  And what's up with the "other" category? Is IDC still pretending like cheap, Chinese white=box tablets sold in CVS and street corner tourist shops some how holds a torch to the iPad?

post #12 of 49
1. Shipments
2. "Others"

'Nuff said.
post #13 of 49

Not to worry.  The post-PC era has barely even begun.

The Wintel PC era started in the '90s.

The DOS PC era started in the '80s.

The general "personal computing" era started in the '60s.

Plenty of time for iPad to take over in the post-PC era.

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post #14 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by paxman View Post
 

The day I can drop my iPad in a charging stand and at that point operate it with a keyboard (inc the use of CMD-Tab), and a mouse it will become a LOT more useful and speedy as a laptop replacement. Not sure it will ever happen because the mbAir is still so awesome. I feel spoilt for choice to be honest and I am pretty damn happy with my mix of devices at this moment.

 My guess your desire for the old 'docking station' will not be an Apple product....

 

because...

- Power will shift to inductive.

- 'ac' networking will approach gigabit speeds

- speakers/display are 'airplay' now.

- BT keyboard  (mouse/trackpad... maybe soon)

- Continuity gives you the ability to have both worlds for all your dual-platform 'content'.

 

I do see the market for what you want (5% of a 27% of a global market... is a bit number).

 

Apple would rather sell you 

AppleTV

Airport Extreme

for $300

 

Than a $100 docking station.

post #15 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by jungmark View Post

1. Shipments
2. "Others"

'Nuff said.

3.  "Others" = "A Lot of Kindles"

post #16 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by SockRolid View Post
 

Not to worry.  The post-PC era has barely even begun.

The Wintel PC era started in the '90s.

The DOS PC era started in the '80s.

The general "personal computing" era started in the '60s.

Plenty of time for iPad to take over in the post-PC era.

I would argue that the 'revolution' cycle time has decreased by an order of magnitude, and increased on world social impact by an order of magnitude.  10% of every man/woman/child in the world has smartphones now.  .00....01% had access to a 'computer' before 'personal' computers. 

 

and I would argue it was never a PC thing, but a network (lower case 'n') thing, which at its root, a speed of communication thing.

 

The iPad/iPhone is just a very convenient Internet Spigot you can keep in your pocket/satchel.   The more people who have similar (or have things that interconnect seamlessly with the apps/functions on my spigot), the more valuable.

 

Moore's Law is less important than Metcalf's Law.   And like other networks (Ma Bell, for example), it's those early years that define the path, trajectory, and limits of the capability.   We don't want a disconnected Babel.

post #17 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by CanukStorm View Post


You could always opt for a Surface Pro 3.

ROFL
post #18 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheOtherGeoff View Post
 

I would argue that the 'revolution' cycle time has decreased by an order of magnitude, and increased on world social impact by an order of magnitude.  10% of every man/woman/child in the world has smartphones now.  .00....01% had access to a 'computer' before 'personal' computers. 

 

and I would argue it was never a PC thing, but a network (lower case 'n') thing, which at its root, a speed of communication thing.

 

The iPad/iPhone is just a very convenient Internet Spigot you can keep in your pocket/satchel.   The more people who have similar (or have things that interconnect seamlessly with the apps/functions on my spigot), the more valuable.

 

Moore's Law is less important than Metcalf's Law.   And like other networks (Ma Bell, for example), it's those early years that define the path, trajectory, and limits of the capability.   We don't want a disconnected Babel.


All excellent points.  I think, to split hairs, we can divide the PC era into sub-eras: pre-internet and internet.

Pre-internet ('80s to early '90s) there was DOS, there were floppy discs, and there were Ethernet LANs.

PCs were for desktop publishing, grinding out spreadsheets, etc. and then sending it all to your boss on the LAN.

Internet access allowed PCs to be used for searching the web, doing online research, and communicating globally.

PCs went from being local LAN workstations to being, as you say, internet appliances.

(Remember the words "workstation" and "sneakernet?"  How about "pizza box"? LOL.)

 

But we have no idea how long the post-PC era will last, or what sub-eras it might contain.

Will Siri and Google Now become the UX of choice (like in the move "Her") in the next 10 years?

Will all the chrome and animation and oh-so-precious pixel-perfection of app design all just go away in favor of voice?

Will the iTunes App Store evolve into the Siri Accessories store?  With UI-less iOS plugins that used to be called "apps"?

Will we finally dump the "keyboard" and move on to gesture / voice / thought control of our devices?

Will we all be walking around with earpiece internet appliances and disposable displays in our pockets in 2024?

Who knows?


Edited by SockRolid - 7/24/14 at 12:03pm

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post #19 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by wakefinance View Post


I haven't looked at their income statement, but a really simple explanation is that their expenses increased more than their revenues did. Samsung may have brought in more revenues than ever, but if they spent even more on R&D or marketing, then their profits would still decline.

 

Revenue was down 10% in their mobile division (tablets/smartphones)

 

http://www.trefis.com/stock/ssnlf/articles/246392/samsung-q2-preview-weaker-smartphone-sales-inventory-concerns-will-impact-results/2014-07-24

post #20 of 49

Take out the 'Others' tablets (which are probably $49 POS) then Apple has 50% of the market.

Probably have 75% of the revenue.

And 90% of the profits.

post #21 of 49

Wheres Amazon?

post #22 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by SockRolid View Post
 
But we have no idea how long the post-PC era will last, or what sub-eras it might contain.

Will Siri and Google Now become the UX of choice (like in the move "Her") in the next 10 years?

Will all the chrome and animation and oh-so-precious pixel-perfection of app design all just go away in favor of voice?

Will the iTunes App Store evolve into the Siri Accessories store?  With UI-less iOS plugins that used to be called "apps"?

Will we finally dump the "keyboard" and move on to gesture / voice / thought control of our devices?

Will we all be walking around with earpiece internet appliances and disposable displays in our pockets in 2024?

Who knows?

I sure hope not. That sounds terrible. Do we really need more disposable electronics?

 

Personally, I'd much prefer a 60" 4K monitor and a PFLOP computer with pixel perfect input control.

 

I sincerely hope that visual arts based computing will continue to be developed in parallel with small personal communication devices. Neither replaces the other. Since the days of carving petroglyphs, visual art has been part of the human experience and I don't see that ending anytime soon. To imagine that the computing world to be reduced to sending tweets via Siri sounds absolutely dismal.

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post #23 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post
 

I sure hope not. That sounds terrible. Do we really need more disposable electronics?

 

Personally, I'd much prefer a 60" 4K monitor and a PFLOP computer with pixel perfect input control.

 

I sincerely hope that visual arts based computing will continue to be developed in parallel with small personal communication devices. Neither replaces the other. Since the days of carving petroglyphs, visual art has been part of the human experience and I don't see that ending anytime soon. To imagine that computing world to be reduced to sending tweets via Siri sounds absolutely dismal.


Oops.  Forgot to say "mobile computing" somewhere in there.  (And absolutely, mobile computing will devolve into "disposable electronics".)

There will always be a place for big-screen 8K pixel-perfection: the living room.

Or maybe by the time 8K TVs become affordable, we'll have room-filling holographic 3D displays.

Again, like in the movie "Her."

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post #24 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by smaceslin View Post

I'm an Apple person since the old Apple II days.  However, being an IT professional, I had to try all the other flavors of tablets.  Apple just gets it.  No one else understands the tablet metaphor any better than our friends in Cupertino.

Been using tablets since the days of Windows 3.11 for Pen Computing, the Apple Newton. The modern Surface pro tablets try to mimic the hardware and polish of modern iPads, but not the post-PC user experience. Microsoft recently patted itself on the back for shipping a "metro UI" file manager for their tablet. Uh, that's not a step forward.

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post #25 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheOtherGeoff View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by paxman View Post
 

The day I can drop my iPad in a charging stand and at that point operate it with a keyboard (inc the use of CMD-Tab), and a mouse it will become a LOT more useful and speedy as a laptop replacement. Not sure it will ever happen because the mbAir is still so awesome. I feel spoilt for choice to be honest and I am pretty damn happy with my mix of devices at this moment.

 My guess your desire for the old 'docking station' will not be an Apple product....

 

because...

- Power will shift to inductive.

- 'ac' networking will approach gigabit speeds

- speakers/display are 'airplay' now.

- BT keyboard  (mouse/trackpad... maybe soon)

- Continuity gives you the ability to have both worlds for all your dual-platform 'content'.

 

I do see the market for what you want (5% of a 27% of a global market... is a bit number).

 

Apple would rather sell you 

AppleTV

Airport Extreme

for $300

 

Than a $100 docking station.

 

Continuity is such a strong concept. Rather than trying to create a compromise device that combines phone-tablet or tablet-pc, let each dedicated device do what it does best, but allow a seamless transition from one device to the next. I am not totally opposed to a hybrid concept, especially if funds don't permit having one of each type of device, but Continuity seems so much more powerful. Especially considering that so many people have at least two of the three: phone, tablet, or laptop.

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post #26 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by SockRolid View Post
 
Oops.  Forgot to say "mobile computing" somewhere in there.  (And absolutely, mobile computing will devolve into "disposable electronics".)

There will always be a place for big-screen 8K pixel-perfection: the living room.

Or maybe by the time 8K TVs become affordable, we'll have room-filling holographic 3D displays.

Again, like in the movie "Her."

I suppose I should have mentioned the premise of my argument was that there isn't really a post-PC world. People who can get by with only a mobile device have very trivial computing needs. A life without real big screen computing would be very boring to me. That would be like living without a kitchen and eating only prepackaged ready-to-eat fast food. I like my organic vegetable garden and eat only hand made gourmet meals. Same idea. I despise modern society's mass-produced disposable mindset.

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post #27 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by RoundaboutNow View Post
 

 

Continuity is such a strong concept. Rather than trying to create a compromise device that combines phone-tablet or tablet-pc, let each dedicated device do what it does best, but allow a seamless transition from one device to the next. I am not totally opposed to a hybrid concept, especially if funds don't permit having one of each type of device, but Continuity seems so much more powerful. Especially considering that so many people have at least two of the three: phone, tablet, or laptop.

Exactly.   The right tool for the job at hand, but no tool excludes the use of another 

 

The problem with hybrid on a lower power computing device is that it negates much of the benefit.   

 

 

Now, if I can just get my calendars to sync all the time.

post #28 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by SockRolid View Post
 

But we have no idea how long the post-PC era will last, or what sub-eras it might contain.

Will Siri and Google Now become the UX of choice (like in the move "Her") in the next 10 years?

Will all the chrome and animation and oh-so-precious pixel-perfection of app design all just go away in favor of voice?

Will the iTunes App Store evolve into the Siri Accessories store?  With UI-less iOS plugins that used to be called "apps"?

Will we finally dump the "keyboard" and move on to gesture / voice / thought control of our devices?

Will we all be walking around with earpiece internet appliances and disposable displays in our pockets in 2024?

Who knows?

 

The App store (especially in-app functionality purchases) are an interesting implementation of Alan Cox's  (father of ObjC) concept of the 'software IC'   where micro payments are made every unit of time you use something.  micro royalties, pay per use, whatever.   If you're paying .99 for something... would you pay less  (0.01) and use a broader set of valuable stuff.   Apply that to Siri and custom filters.  and then apply Siri coming back and saying... "I have a custom database that has highly curated and accurate info... would you like to search that today, this month, or forever (it will cost .10 each request, or .99 for a monthly subscription, or $9.99 for a lifetime)... No? or for how long?

 

I do see a day that there will be a '$$' symbol someplace on the pull-up/down screens to keep you up to date on your 'spend' that your AppleID and subIDs are accumulating as you navigate through the things you do on your phone.   

 

 

Siri and eventually some body motion readying assistant will be part of the interface (or the Mitchell Gant "Firefox" Brain Monitoring interface, as long as you think in Russian;-)

 

Luddites will say, 'But I'm faster with a  keyboard' .... (didn't the Blackberry show that that was a false efficiency?)  Or how about typing on an 'air keyboard?;-)'

 

It marches on.

 

What we're doing with an iPhone today was tossed about in the 60's .  Watching Minority Report (and xbox Kinect), the technology for motion communication is likely less than 50 years away, more like 50 months.  (that order of magnitude thing)

post #29 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheOtherGeoff View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by jungmark View Post

1. Shipments
2. "Others"

'Nuff said.

3.  "Others" = "A Lot of Kindles"

Yeah, it would be nice to have "others" broken down, but it probably is some Kindles & Fires and a lot of those not-really-full-functioned-tablets $49 POS's that sog35 and an article here from a few months ago refer to…so, see? they probably do "break down"...

And there should be a new rule here not to print articles that don't differentiate between 'shipments' and 'sales'.

post #30 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by boredumb View Post
 

Yeah, it would be nice to have "others" broken down, but it probably is some Kindles & Fires and a lot of those not-really-full-functioned-tablets $49 POS's that sog35 and an article here from a few months ago refer to…so, see? they probably do "break down"...

And there should be a new rule here not to print articles that don't differentiate between 'shipments' and 'sales'.

part of my comment is raw data (in our hyper aware state) is better than useless summarizations.

Anything less than 1Munits/q isn't shown.  Which means there at least 22 other VENDORS out there.

 

Amazon  (fires are 4 and 5 on top electronics sold, and Kindle Paperwhite is number 2)

Microsoft

Blackberry

 

among them.

 

Part of this (on my cynical side) is that IDC has such fudgy numbers for everyone but apple, that it 'thinks' this many tablets were sold, but can't account for them, therefore it creates a bunch of 'others' to account for that.

 

Method and raw data would make me a believer.

post #31 of 49
Quote:
The tablet market remains Apple's to lose, according to new data released Thursday....

 Also according to old data released last month.  And the month before.  And the year before that... etc.

 

No matter what you're selling, when you're #1 in the market, that market is always "yours to lose".  That's just a re-statement of what it means to be #1.  It is another way of saying that you're winning.  NOBODY ever says that the 3rd runner up has the market "to lose".  They already lost.

 

So... Apple is winning the race. Still. They're just running a bit slower than before.  For now.

 

Quote:

Company officials said they were not concerned, however....

 

And why would they be?  

Neither is Stephen Kiprotich worried.

I don't understand why Sam Oliver is trying to make Apple's victories sound like failures.

post #32 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by sog35 View Post

Wheres Amazon?

Amazon only make an appearance in the "Top 5" during the Christmas quarter and the Spring quarter.

The other two quarters they are far below... mixed in with "Others" like they are now.

I love it when people say "but the Kindle Fire is the best-selling tablet on Amazon!"

That's true... on Amazon.com. But when you factor in all the other tablets around the world... Amazon barely makes a dent in the tablet market.

According to the data in this chart... Amazon sold no more than 999,999 tablets this past quarter.

(we can debate the merits and methodologies of this chart another time... I was just looking at what was presented here) 1biggrin.gif
post #33 of 49
Well there are the new iPads coming in so their would be a slump in sales as people want what's new.
post #34 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by sog35 View Post
 

 

Revenue was down 10% in their mobile division (tablets/smartphones)

 

http://www.trefis.com/stock/ssnlf/articles/246392/samsung-q2-preview-weaker-smartphone-sales-inventory-concerns-will-impact-results/2014-07-24

 

They release the financial statements for the current quarter on July 31.  Last quarter they squeaked by with a slightly higher profit than the same quarter last year.

 

http://www.samsung.com/us/aboutsamsung/investor_relations/financial_information/downloads/2014/2014_con_quarter01_soi.pdf

 

I would expect their profits to decline overall according to the guidance in the article you cited, but as I suggested, it's due largely to an increase in expenses.  Their operating income is expected to drop about 25% while revenues are only expected to drop by about 10%, indicating a massive increase in operating expenses.

post #35 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by wakefinance View Post

They release the financial statements for the current quarter on July 31.  Last quarter they squeaked by with a slightly higher profit than the same quarter last year.

http://www.samsung.com/us/aboutsamsung/investor_relations/financial_information/downloads/2014/2014_con_quarter01_soi.pdf

I would expect their profits to decline overall according to the guidance in the article you cited, but as I suggested, it's due largely to an increase in expenses.  Their operating income is expected to drop about 25% while revenues are only expected to drop by about 10%, indicating a massive increase in operating expenses.

But IDC is showing Samsung increases shipments of phones/tablets yet there revenue is down 10%?

Either IDC is spewing BS or Samsung is lying when they say they are not hurting at the top end
post #36 of 49

This really isn't making sense to me. Are there really 50 million tablets shipped in the last quarter? If so, where the hell are they?

 

Without any official sales figures, people can only make educated guesses looking at inventory and ad-hoc surveys of stores, but even that will not allow for a vaguely clear picture.

 

This just looks like a brief survey + major extrapolation.

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by TheOtherGeoff View Post
 

3.  "Others" = "A Lot of Kindles"

 

A lot of Kindles, but not enough to account for 44% right? I mean, even if it was 10%, Bezos would actually announce sales figures!

post #37 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by BestKeptSecret View Post

This really isn't making sense to me. Are there really 50 million tablets shipped in the last quarter? If so, where the hell are they?

Without any official sales figures, people can only make educated guesses looking at inventory and ad-hoc surveys of stores, but even that will not allow for a vaguely clear picture.

This just looks like a brief survey + major extrapolation.

There are over 100 manufacturers of tablets... and over 500 models of tablets on sale around the world.

Most of them are cheap junk Android tablets... but they're tablets nonetheless. And since more tablets get shipped every quarter... someone must actually be buying them. (unless they all end up in a landfill in New Mexico) 1smile.gif

China and India have 2,600,000,000 people combined. I would imagine that's where a lot of tablets end up.

We always debate these shipment numbers... but multiple analytics firms come up with similar numbers every quarter. They all get their numbers from a variety of sources. Can anyone possibly track the exact whereabouts of 50 million tablets across the globe? Probably not... but they can paint enough of a picture.

If there was some great conspiracy... we would have heard about it by now.

Personally... I don't care if tens of millions of garbage tablets get pumped into the market every quarter. It doesn't affect me in the least.

What I think is funny is when people think Android is "winning" because of all those garbage tablets.... or that Apple is somehow "losing" because of them. That's hilarious.
post #38 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael Scrip View Post

What I think is funny is when people think Android is "winning" because of all those garbage tablets.... or that Apple is somehow "losing" because of them. That's hilarious.

 

No one believes that and frankly it's getting a little annoying that people are even implying it, it's very, more then clear that Apple is so far ahead in the tablet game that all it would take is for them to lower their over inflated margins by as little as half, and they could effectively wipe out all competition in less then a year. However that would most defiantly bring the feds knocking on their door step faster then you could say, "Dutch East India Company", unless of course they grant Apple some sort of a Coercive monopoly, which actually wouldn't surprise me one bit given the amount of power and popularity Apple holds. However calling Apple a "monopoly" now is just a lazy exaggeration to imply that it has a "monopolistic" position in the market, which means that although it's not actually a monopoly, it's close enough to be deemed "anticompetitive."

 

As bad as Samsung may appear, we are actually better off having them in the picture then not, without Samsung yipping at the heals of Apple who else is available to give them at least a small amount of competition. I don't care how good the iPad or iPhone is, if you think it's the perfect device, whatever, we need more competition, not less, in fact for the first time in a long time I feel a little uneasy about current state of the mobile market. There's basically just two players, Google and Apple and that just sucks. Big reason why I purchase and at least try to support, use the underdogs stuff, Windows Mobile, Jolla and I'm still waiting on my Neo900. Not saying there better, I just don't want to see these companies giving up either, could you imagine a world where only two mobile OS's existed, God forbid just one, we're almost to that point now.

When I looked up "Ninjas" in Thesaurus.com, it said "Ninja's can't be found" Well played Ninjas, well played.
Reply
When I looked up "Ninjas" in Thesaurus.com, it said "Ninja's can't be found" Well played Ninjas, well played.
Reply
post #39 of 49

Does IDC have an data on returns?

 

I'm sure that TENS OF MILLIONS of tablets get returned to the manufacter every month.

Just look at Costco and how many Samsung tablets they have in stock.  No way on earth do they sell all of those.

 

So Samsung continues to stuff the channel and IDC counts it as Shipments.

When Costco returns the unsold tablets does IDC subtract that?

 

I think this BS will end soon though.  Samsung's profits is down 25% this quarter and I think a big part of it is losses on unsold tablets/phones.  Stuffing the channel looks good.....until you need to recognize the loss.  I expect Samsung's tablet shipped to drop sharply by the end of this year.

post #40 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by Relic View Post

No one believes that and frankly it's getting a little annoying that people are even implying it, it's very, more then clear that Apple is so far ahead in the tablet game that all it would take is for them to lower their over inflated margins by as little as half, and they could effectively wipe out all competition in less then a year. However that would most defiantly bring the feds knocking on their door step faster then you could say, "Dutch East India Company", unless of course they grant Apple some sort of a Coercive monopoly, which actually wouldn't surprise me one bit given the amount of power and popularity Apple holds. However calling Apple a "monopoly" now is just a lazy exaggeration to imply that it has a "monopolistic" position in the market, which means that although it's not actually a monopoly, it's close enough to be deemed "anticompetitive."

As bad as Samsung may appear, we are actually better off having them in the picture then not, without Samsung yipping at the heals of Apple who else is available to give them at least a small amount of competition. I don't care how good the iPad or iPhone is, if you think it's the perfect device, whatever, we need more competition, not less, in fact for the first time in a long time I feel a little uneasy about current state of the mobile market. There's basically just two players, Google and Apple and that just sucks. Big reason why I purchase and at least try to support, use the underdogs stuff, Windows Mobile, Jolla and I'm still waiting on my Neo900. Not saying there better, I just don't want to see these companies giving up either, could you imagine a world where only two mobile OS's existed, God forbid just one, we're almost to that point now.

Oh Relic! I read your post.
Why does only Apple need competition?
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