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New Android 'Fake ID' flaw empowers stealthy new class of super-malware - Page 2

post #41 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by acatomic View Post


I forgot to say that it's not a Mac, it's an iPad and it's not jailbroken.

The other way to load an app outside of the app store is by using a signed adhoc provisioning profile (which you're typically limited to an audience of 100 devices) or an enterprise provisioning profile (I think has no limit) both of which must have a valid Developer Apple ID account and can be blocked by Apple if it wishes to do so.

 

Did you get a prompt to install a certificate before installing the update?

 

something like this:

 

post #42 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by acatomic View Post

I need a little bit of help from you guys, there's one thing I don't understand and I'm hoping you can explain it to me. In January I downloaded a free app from the app store which had free movies and cartoons but was later taken down by Apple. Later I got notified by the app that there was an update available but it can only be downloaded from their webpage, so I did and it worked.

So my question is how is this possible? I thought it was only possible to download apps from the app store store and nowhere else.

From your subsequent post I gathered you are referring to an iPad. Assuming it's true this would worry me. I am as well of the opinion that this would be impossible.
OTOH I seem to recall a couple of occasions where an iPad game upon launch loaded some new content, new levels etc. Thinking about this how can one be sure no malware is introduced in this way?
Yeah, well, you know, that's just, like, my opinion, man.
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Yeah, well, you know, that's just, like, my opinion, man.
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post #43 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by digitalclips View Post

Ah ... OK sorry, I am using a Mac as I read and assumed .... my bad.

Still wish I had an answer as this could be a major iOS security hole.
Quote:
Originally Posted by matt45 View Post

The other way to load an app outside of the app store is by using a signed adhoc provisioning profile (which you're typically limited to an audience of 100 devices) or an enterprise provisioning profile (I think has no limit) both of which must have a valid Developer Apple ID account and can be blocked by Apple if it wishes to do so.

Did you get a prompt to install a certificate before installing the update?

something like this:


Quote:
Originally Posted by matt45 View Post

The other way to load an app outside of the app store is by using a signed adhoc provisioning profile (which you're typically limited to an audience of 100 devices) or an enterprise provisioning profile (I think has no limit) both of which must have a valid Developer Apple ID account and can be blocked by Apple if it wishes to do so.

Did you get a prompt to install a certificate before installing the update?

something like this:



No. I just pushed the download button on the website and it got installed.
post #44 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by acatomic View Post

Still wish I had an answer as this could be a major iOS security hole.

No. I just pushed the download button on the website and it got installed.

Would you mind sharing the name of the app?
Yeah, well, you know, that's just, like, my opinion, man.
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Yeah, well, you know, that's just, like, my opinion, man.
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post #45 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by WonkoTheSane View Post

Would you mind sharing the name of the app?

CartoonHD, but their website is gone now.
post #46 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by EricTheHalfBee View Post
 

 

It fits your original comment which stated "The title is indeed somewhat misleading as there are no real world examples of this vulnerability being used by malware."

 

I'm dying for you to tell me how you know there are no real world examples.

 

 

That's easy - DED would have been crowing about it from the rooftops instead of spreading FUD on his vegie patch.

post #47 of 102

Removed.  meant to quote another post

post #48 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by acatomic View Post

CartoonHD, but their website is gone now.

I found http://forums.macrumors.com/showthread.php?t=1732270
Yeah, well, you know, that's just, like, my opinion, man.
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Yeah, well, you know, that's just, like, my opinion, man.
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post #49 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by acatomic View Post


Still wish I had an answer as this could be a major iOS security hole.

No. I just pushed the download button on the website and it got installed.

Its most likely just a web app. I downloaded a weather program called forecast the same way. Its not a true App.

 

http://forecast.io/

post #50 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by WisdomSeed View Post

While it sounds menacing, has the exploit actually been found in the wild? I'm never sure where the terror starts, there is a vast difference between 'can/might' and 'did'.

One thing is that in order to be affected by this flaw, one has to enable a checkbox buried in Settings that is disabled by default. Enabling said option triggers a warning message that enabling the option makes the phone and personal data more vulnerable to attacks and you have to accept or decline.

post #51 of 102
Deja Vu. Windows "experience".
post #52 of 102
I really, really wish the folks over at Consumer Reports would factor this data into their glowing reviews of Android phones and tablets. I've only seen the malware issue mentioned in passing in a recent article about cyber security.
post #53 of 102
The important thing is that exploits are only a "real concern" on Apple platforms and that Google is above criticism. As long as we agree on that, the forums will run smoothly. 1smile.gif

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
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"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
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post #54 of 102

Please no. Between “polar vortex”, “supermoon”, “superstorm”, and all the other ludicrously idiotic, meaningless, and misleading buzzwords the media seems to want to invent this decade, we don’t need “super malware” thrown in.

Originally Posted by Marvin

The only thing more insecure than Android’s OS is its userbase.
Reply

Originally Posted by Marvin

The only thing more insecure than Android’s OS is its userbase.
Reply
post #55 of 102
Another fear mongering Apple Insider article. 
Google scanned every app in it's official app store. Found no instances of this exploit.
Google updated automatically, behind the scenes every android device to add this exploit check to it's verify apps program.
In order to for this exploit to be used this is what has to happen:
1. Go into security settings and enable third party app installation (off by default)
2. Accept the warning saying not to do this.
3. A developer will have to actually make an app that uses this exploit.
4. The user will have to download this malicious new, theoretical app from a third party app store.
5. User will have to accept a prompt asking if they want to install a third party app that could be potentially harmful.
6. User will have to override the verify app warning that explicitly states that the app was found to be malicious (does it even let you???)
This is a non-issue. While it's never good to see a a security flaw, like is the case with every Android security flaw out there, Google has in place the necessary defenses.
post #56 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by Suddenly Newton View Post

The important thing is that exploits are only a "real concern" on Apple platforms and that Google is above criticism. As long as we agree on that, the forums will run smoothly. 1smile.gif

Am I the only one increasingly suspicious of the huge security flaws turning up in all the most widely used pieces of software (Heartbleed, 'goto fail', and now this)? Groups like the NSA benefit greatly from undetected exploits like these - are they just unfortunate bugs, or something more?

 

Alternatively, perhaps I need to go and buy a tinfoil hat.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post
 

Please no. Between “polar vortex”, “supermoon”, “superstorm”, and all the other ludicrously idiotic, meaningless, and misleading buzzwords the media seems to want to invent this decade, we don’t need “super malware” thrown in.

I honestly don't understand why they aren't just calling it 'malware'. Privilege escalation exploits do not a different name make. 

Although perhaps it's just the same people that benefit from 'iOS confirmed as most insecure software ever written' scare stories doing the same thing with Android.

post #57 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by delreyjones View Post

I quite agree with you.  And I might go a step further, because it seems that 9 times out of 10, these theoretical vulnerabilities are found in an Apple platform and the tech press creates a bunch of sound and fury signifying nothing.  I'd be pleased to see Apple Insider document this phenomenon of theoretical threat versus in-the-wild reality.  Today's DED story is like the exception that proves the rule, because in general this phenomenon is used to create anti-Apple FUD.

you got me thinking....

what would Apples market share be without all the propaganda and FUD?

Would iPhone have significantly more marketshare or would sales basically be the same?

I brought up the iPhone to my dad once and he responded "but doesn't the iPhone suck?"
He really is a moron but there's probably millions of them.
I've also gotten a similar reaponse from a female friend. I could go on, but it seems like the brainwashing only affects uneducated people.
post #58 of 102
Originally Posted by cali View Post
...it seems like the brainwashing only affects uneducated people.

 

Isn’t that the definition? How people who’ve broken the constitution keep getting elected because their constituencies are too stupid to know, etc.?

Originally Posted by Marvin

The only thing more insecure than Android’s OS is its userbase.
Reply

Originally Posted by Marvin

The only thing more insecure than Android’s OS is its userbase.
Reply
post #59 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

Isn’t that the definition? How people who’ve broken the constitution keep getting elected because their constituencies are too stupid to know, etc.?

Is it ignorance of the law breaking, or an affinity for the law breaker?
"Few things are harder to put up with than the annoyance of a good example" Mark Twain
"Just because something is deemed the law doesn't make it just" - SolipsismX
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"Few things are harder to put up with than the annoyance of a good example" Mark Twain
"Just because something is deemed the law doesn't make it just" - SolipsismX
Reply
post #60 of 102
Originally Posted by dasanman69 View Post
Is it ignorance of the law breaking, or an affinity for the law breaker?

 

Both (usually only the first), the latter founded in the former.

Originally Posted by Marvin

The only thing more insecure than Android’s OS is its userbase.
Reply

Originally Posted by Marvin

The only thing more insecure than Android’s OS is its userbase.
Reply
post #61 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by cali View Post

you got me thinking....

what would Apples market share be without all the propaganda and FUD?

Would iPhone have significantly more marketshare or would sales basically be the same?

I brought up the iPhone to my dad once and he responded "but doesn't the iPhone suck?"
He really is a moron but there's probably millions of them.
I've also gotten a similar reaponse from a female friend. I could go on, but it seems like the brainwashing only affects uneducated people.

The company I work for handed out Motorola tablets recently. When I inquired about why weren't we getting iPads the answer I got was "nobody uses iPads anymore", and this was from a quite educated, and very tech savvy manager.
"Few things are harder to put up with than the annoyance of a good example" Mark Twain
"Just because something is deemed the law doesn't make it just" - SolipsismX
Reply
"Few things are harder to put up with than the annoyance of a good example" Mark Twain
"Just because something is deemed the law doesn't make it just" - SolipsismX
Reply
post #62 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

Isn’t that the definition? How people who’ve broken the constitution keep getting elected because their constituencies are too stupid to know, etc.?

hey! I trust our governments because I've been taught since a child that they exist to protect our rights!!!! 1wink.gif
post #63 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by cali View Post

hey! I trust our governments because I've been taught since a child that they exist to protect our rights!!!! 1wink.gif

How could you trust a government that leaves your left unprotected? lol.gif
"Few things are harder to put up with than the annoyance of a good example" Mark Twain
"Just because something is deemed the law doesn't make it just" - SolipsismX
Reply
"Few things are harder to put up with than the annoyance of a good example" Mark Twain
"Just because something is deemed the law doesn't make it just" - SolipsismX
Reply
post #64 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by dasanman69 View Post

The company I work for handed out Motorola tablets recently. When I inquired about why weren't we getting iPads the answer I got was "nobody uses iPads anymore", and this was from a quite educated, and very tech savvy manager.

haha I'd definitely question this guys "tech savvy".

SLIGHTLY OFF TOPIC:

Reminds me of an android fan I once knew. He thought he was the smartest guy in the world. His "tech savvy" was years beyond common man. He would often try to correct people about technology and thought everyone in the world was stupid except him. He would defend Giggle and MS to the death. He even contemplated buying a Zune!!

Back in 2009 he said I was dumb because I bought an iMac and I could've put together a Windows PC. He had just bought a Windows PC the same year.

Eventually I got sick of his sh** and schooled em in basic tech. He didn't know what 720p was. he didn't know what the "p" stood for. He didn't know what frames per second were. He was a big Microsoft fan so he was furious when I told him Halo was bought from Apple and Steve Jobs.

Turns out he was full of it.

oh and a few months later(2009) his new PC began crashing and his hard drive began burning.
Today my 2009 iMac is still alive and humming!!
post #65 of 102
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post
Android's looking a lot like Windows

 

Yup.  And Google doesn't really care.  To Google, Android is just a mobile ad platform.

97% of Google's revenue comes from ads.  Everything they do reflects that one fact.

 

But anyway, let's shoot down a few boilerplate Android Apologist excuses:

 

1. "You don't know what Android really is."

 

Yes we do.  It's Google's mobile ad platform.  Oh, and Amazon has forked it into a mobile cash register.  Maybe some day Samsung will also fork Android, just so they can control their own destiny (and not rely on Tizen, which is horrible.  I've used it briefly.)

 

There.  Now *you* know what Android really is.  Deal with it.

 

2. "Open always wins."

 

Depends on what you mean by the words "open," "always," and "wins."  If you mean "completely free and open source code will dominate in market share and profit share 100% of the time," then you've got some issues.  First, Android is not completely open source.  The AOSP versions of Google apps have been replaced one by one with closed source versions.  Search, Calendar, Gmail, the list keeps getting longer.

 

What's that you say?  You say "Those are apps, not the kernel!  Yaaay opennnn!!!"

Well guess what.  Put down your glittery open-source pom-poms and call up a would-be Android hardware maker.

Ask them to create a fork of Android that really does conform to AOSP (Android Open Source Project).

They'll tell you "Well, it would be pretty easy to port the kernel.  But creating our own version of all those apps will be a killer."

But anyway, the OHA (Open Handset Alliance) goons would smack us down for not building Google-approved devices.

 

For example, here's what happened to Acer when they tried to go open-source:

 

"Google blocked Acer's rival phone to prevent 'fragmentation'

http://arstechnica.com/gadgets/2012/09/google-blocked-acers-rival-phone-to-prevent-android-fragmentation/

 

And here's Google bragging about shutting down Acer (with plenty of double-talk about "open source")

http://officialandroid.blogspot.com/2012/09/the-benefits-importance-of-compatibility.html

 

As for the word "wins," well pick your definition of "winning."  Market share?  Profit share?  

From what I've heard, "market share" is the most important metric to any and all Android Apologists.

And what does that mean, really?  To Android Apologists, it means "Android phone instead of an iPhone."

In the real world, it means "Apple doesn't sell to the ultra-low-end market anyway.  Few if any lost sales."

 

And in China, where the real "growth" of Android is happening, very few "activations" connect to Google Play.

There are dozens if not hundreds of competing Android app stores of various repute throughout China.

Zero benefit to Google.

 

"App stores big source of mobile viruses"

(and 300 competing Android app stores in China)

http://www.bjd.com.cn/10beijingnews/business/201401/03/t20140103_5769014.html

 

"10 App Stores in China You Ought to Be On"

http://appflood.com/blog/top-10-alternative-app-stores-from-china-2013/

 

"20 Android apps download store alternatives!"

http://www.gizchina.com/2012/08/14/20-ways-to-get-free-android-apps-downloads/

 

Oh, and as for profit share, Apple owns an "outrageous" share of all mobile profits:

"Pie chart: Apple's outrageous share..."

http://fortune.com/2010/09/21/pie-chart-apples-outrageous-share-of-the-mobile-industrys-profits/

 

3. "Any day now, there will be a new awesome-r-ish Android release."

 

Yeah.  Right.  We've been hearing that for years and years and years now.

How's that Butter going?

Did it help all those Android devices still running Gingerbread 2.3 scroll smoothly?  

Finally?

No?  They can't be updated?  

Oh well.  Life in the big city yadda.

 

Keep waiting.  Don't hold your breath.  The problem with copying Apple is that you need to wait for Apple to release something new so you have something to copy.  That forces your user base to wait until you've caught up.  Vicious cycle.


Edited by SockRolid - 7/29/14 at 12:40pm

Sent from my iPhone Simulator

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Sent from my iPhone Simulator

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post #66 of 102
You want privacy, security and reliability? Don't use Android or Windows%u2026
post #67 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by dasanman69 View Post

How could you trust a government that leaves your left unprotected? lol.gif

sarcasm and irony. 1wink.gif
the conversation was about brainwashing.
post #68 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by SockRolid View Post

 

2. "Open always wins."

 

Depends on what you mean by the words "open," "always," and "wins."  If you mean "completely free and open source code will dominate in market share and profit share 100% of the time," then you've got some issues.  First, Android is not completely open source.  The AOSP versions of Google apps have been replaced one by one with closed source versions.  Search, Calendar, Gmail, the list keeps getting longer.

 

As both Apple and Google have discovered, the best approach is neither completely open nor completely closed, but something in between (which is why their OSes are converging amid cries of 'omg stealing' from both sides). 

post #69 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by NexusPhan View Post
 

But I thought that one of the big advantages of running Android was not being locked into an eco-system. When the only source for apps is GooglePlay, doesn't that eliminate one of the big pluses DroidFans crow about?

 

It is true that this hasn't been found in the wild, but now that it is publicized, how long before some unscrupulous developer jumps in on this? Sure Google has provided a fix, but it's mostly a CYA move - how successfully will it propagate down through the Android users?

 

The only advantage that Androids have is that since each model is the newest and best, most of the older devices are now in a landfill or electronic recycling somewhere and aren't at risk ...

post #70 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by cali View Post


haha I'd definitely question this guys "tech savvy".

SLIGHTLY OFF TOPIC:

Reminds me of an android fan I once knew. He thought he was the smartest guy in the world. His "tech savvy" was years beyond common man. He would often try to correct people about technology and thought everyone in the world was stupid except him. He would defend Giggle and MS to the death. He even contemplated buying a Zune!!

Back in 2009 he said I was dumb because I bought an iMac and I could've put together a Windows PC. He had just bought a Windows PC the same year.

Eventually I got sick of his sh** and schooled em in basic tech. He didn't know what 720p was. he didn't know what the "p" stood for. He didn't know what frames per second were. He was a big Microsoft fan so he was furious when I told him Halo was bought from Apple and Steve Jobs.

Turns out he was full of it.

oh and a few months later(2009) his new PC began crashing and his hard drive began burning.
Today my 2009 iMac is still alive and humming!!

I thought Bungie was an independent company that produced games primarily for the MAC before branching out to include windows, then MS after seeing HALO bought them for the original XBOX and werent owned by Apple or Jobs?

post #71 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by elehcdn View Post

But I thought that one of the big advantages of running Android was not being locked into an eco-system. When the only source for apps is GooglePlay, doesn't that eliminate one of the big pluses DroidFans crow about?

It is true that this hasn't been found in the wild, but now that it is publicized, how long before some unscrupulous developer jumps in on this? Sure Google has provided a fix, but it's mostly a CYA move - how successfully will it propagate down through the Android users?

The only advantage that Androids have is that since each model is the newest and best, most of the older devices are now in a landfill or electronic recycling somewhere and aren't at risk ...

You can also get apps from Amazon. They only allow apps after vetting them.
"Few things are harder to put up with than the annoyance of a good example" Mark Twain
"Just because something is deemed the law doesn't make it just" - SolipsismX
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"Few things are harder to put up with than the annoyance of a good example" Mark Twain
"Just because something is deemed the law doesn't make it just" - SolipsismX
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post #72 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by singularity View Post
 

I thought Bungie was an independent company that produced games primarily for the MAC before branching out to include windows, then MS after seeing HALO bought them for the original XBOX and werent owned by Apple or Jobs?

That's because you remember correctly.

Bungie was never owned by Apple or Jobs. The reason Bungie was a prime Mac dev is because the Lead programmer, Jason Jones was most familiar with the Apple platform, having been raised on it.

 

Halo was debuted at Macworld 1999, but a year later was acquired by Microsoft in full, thus making Halo a Microsoft IP for the foreseeable future and Bungie a Microsoft company until their split up a few years ago from Microsoft.

post #73 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by cnocbui View Post
 

 

That's easy - DED would have been crowing about it from the rooftops instead of spreading FUD on his vegie patch.

 

 

As the article clearly points out: the last time Bluebox pointed out a major design failing in Android's security architecture, there was malware in the wild within the month. 

 

You lob personal attacks at the author, but the real issue is Google's sloppy work and the difficulty of fixing things in the "open paradise" that is Android. That, and the droid groupies who makes excuses for the company and its half baked products.

post #74 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by singularity View Post

I thought Bungie was an independent company that produced games primarily for the MAC before branching out to include windows, then MS after seeing HALO bought them for the original XBOX and werent owned by Apple or Jobs?

That's about right. Apple showed a preview of HALO in 1999, but were bought by MS in 2000, which of course killed any Mac development. Btw Bungie has been independent again since 2007.
"Few things are harder to put up with than the annoyance of a good example" Mark Twain
"Just because something is deemed the law doesn't make it just" - SolipsismX
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"Few things are harder to put up with than the annoyance of a good example" Mark Twain
"Just because something is deemed the law doesn't make it just" - SolipsismX
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post #75 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by NexusPhan View Post
Another fear mongering Apple Insider article. 
Google scanned every app in it's official app store. Found no instances of this exploit.
 
Google presumably also "scanned" its Android code and failed to realize that it wasn't even verifying app signing certificates. That's pretty basic PKI work.  
 
Google updated automatically, behind the scenes every android device to add this exploit check to it's verify apps program.
 
This isn't even remotely true. Google has started issuing some updates and patches via Google Play Services, but this happened all of twice this year. The last update is 5.0, from June 25. Check your phone to see if you have an update. You do not, because a new one hasn't been released yet.   
 
In order to for this exploit to be used this is what has to happen:
1. Go into security settings and enable third party app installation (off by default)
2. Accept the warning saying not to do this.
3. A developer will have to actually make an app that uses this exploit.
4. The user will have to download this malicious new, theoretical app from a third party app store.
5. User will have to accept a prompt asking if they want to install a third party app that could be potentially harmful.
6. User will have to override the verify app warning that explicitly states that the app was found to be malicious (does it even let you???)
 
Thanks for the tip. Google "how to sideload android software" and you get 1M responses. Are you so sure nobody has ever followed any of those?

How about the "Android Central Sideload Wonder Machine" which Android Central promotes and tells its users: "It's a Windows program that can install applications you have downloaded outside the official Android Market to your Android phone."
 
This is a non-issue. While it's never good to see a a security flaw, like is the case with every Android security flaw out there, Google has in place the necessary defenses.
 
What a fantastically ignorant thing to say. So nobody sideloads Android apps, and the same company that doesn't know how to implement basic PKI cryptography for its users is a magical sky god that omnisciently protects all the peoples who buy cheap phones. 
 
Except cheap phones like the Galaxy Nexus (and +80% of all Android phones actively accessing Google Play), which still carry those other serious vulnerabilities related to integrated Flash that pervade every app on the system. 
 
​Keep telling yourself that.
post #76 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by RalphMouth View Post

How do you fix the flaw on all those billions of Android phones that have been sold since 2010?

This is the main difference between Android and iOS that the anti-iOS crowd ignores. Flaws and security breaches are found in both OSes all the time. However it is a lot easier to get the fix out to all the iOS devices. 

Apple has the ability to also remotely kill and remove apps that get through the curation process and onto iDevices.

Additionally, while both OSes could have flaws, and while a security breach is always possible, the possibility of it happening on iOS "all the time" is not true. That distinction is reserved for Android alone. Eventually one of the weaknesses in Android is going to mortally wound that platform.
"That (the) world is moving so quickly that iOS is already amongst the older mobile operating systems in active development today." — The Verge
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"That (the) world is moving so quickly that iOS is already amongst the older mobile operating systems in active development today." — The Verge
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post #77 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by Macky the Macky View Post

Eventually one of the weaknesses in Android is going to mortally wound that platform.

Exaggerate much? As bad as XP was with malware and it didn't mortally wound Windows, why would anything hurt Android.
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"Just because something is deemed the law doesn't make it just" - SolipsismX
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"Few things are harder to put up with than the annoyance of a good example" Mark Twain
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post #78 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by dasanman69 View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Macky the Macky View Post

Eventually one of the weaknesses in Android is going to mortally wound that platform.

Exaggerate much? As bad as XP was with malware and it didn't mortally wound Windows, why would anything hurt Android.

One could also ask, "As good as Blackberry is, why would anyone chose any other Platform?" Android is weak, and run by a company who isn't profiting by having to babysit it. It's not a good combo and one of these days something will happen to wound it and it won't recover... jes say'n.
"That (the) world is moving so quickly that iOS is already amongst the older mobile operating systems in active development today." — The Verge
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"That (the) world is moving so quickly that iOS is already amongst the older mobile operating systems in active development today." — The Verge
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post #79 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by Macky the Macky View Post

One could also ask, "As good as Blackberry is, why would anyone chose any other Platform?" Android is weak, and run by a company who isn't profiting by having to babysit it. It's not a good combo and one of these days something will happen to wound it and it won't recover... jes say'n.

Then what is a 'good combo' since you're jes say'n?
"Few things are harder to put up with than the annoyance of a good example" Mark Twain
"Just because something is deemed the law doesn't make it just" - SolipsismX
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"Few things are harder to put up with than the annoyance of a good example" Mark Twain
"Just because something is deemed the law doesn't make it just" - SolipsismX
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post #80 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by Corrections View Post
 

 

I'm actually running version 5.0.84, but that's beside the point.  The point is that Google has averted most of the problem without a system update by updating its malware scanner in Google Play Services, which will roll out to the 99.3% of Android devices running on Gingerbread or later.  Of course your article wouldn't mention that because it doesn't have quite the same FUDdy ring to it.

 

I should also say that patching the problem with a malware scanner update isn't as good as fixing the vulnerability outright, but it will be sufficient for the devices that won't receive the complete fix in an update to 4.4.5 or L (whichever ends up containing it).

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