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Apple, Samsung shed smartphone share in Q2 as market continues to explode

post #1 of 39
Thread Starter 
Global smartphone shipments increased by nearly 25 percent year-over-year, new data released Tuesday indicates, with Chinese vendors accounting for the lion's share of the growth at the expense of established heavyweights Apple and Samsung.




Despite moving some 35 million iPhone units in the second quarter, Apple's slice of the smartphone market shrunk from 13 percent one year ago to 11.9 percent in the most recent period, according to market research firm IDC. Rival Samsung found itself in an even worse position, dropping more than 7 percentage points year-over-year to finish with 25.2 percent of the market.

Apple's sales are thought to have been restrained somewhat by consumers who elected to wait for the next-generation iPhone before purchasing -- a sentiment echoed by Apple chief Tim Cook on the company's most recent earnings call.

Samsung's fall is especially troubling given that the measured quarter included the release of the company's new flagship Galaxy S5. Despite the high-profile launch, Samsung shipped some 3 million fewer handsets this year than in the year-ago period.

Chinese brands were the big winners in the second quarter, helped along by the still-significant growth from the domestic market. Huawei grew shipments by some 95.1 percent, while Lenovo posted a 38.7 percent increase.

"As the death of the feature phone approaches more rapidly than before, it is the Chinese vendors that are ready to usher emerging market consumers into smartphones," IDC research manager Melissa Chau said in a release. "The offer of smartphones at a much better value than the top global players but with a stronger build quality and larger scale than local competitors gives these vendors a precarious competitive advantage."

It should be noted that IDC's methodologies have been called into question in recent months, as the firm's predictions often differ significantly from reported numbers.
post #2 of 39

SAMDUNG is in huge trouble.

 

Their top end Galaxy S5 is selling worse than the S4.

Their flagship S5 was outsold by Apples 5C.

Their total phones are down 4%

 

We are nearing the point where all Android phones will be commoditized.  There will be no reason to buy a copycat $700 Samdung when you can buy a copycat $200 Chinese phone that is just as good.  I'd argue that some of the Xiaomi phones look better than Samdung at half the price.

 

I predict in 12-18 months (basically by next holiday season) the premium Android market ($600+) will be basically on life support.  With nothing differentiating the high end Android phones to the Chinese stuff the market won't be willing to pay double or triple the price.

 

The Android phone market will basically be the WindowsPC market.  The vast majority will buy the cheap crap with a very few opting for the top of the line.  If they want top of the line they will go to Apple.


Edited by sog35 - 7/29/14 at 11:14am
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post #3 of 39
Originally Posted by sog35 View Post
 

SAMDUNG is in huge trouble.

 

Their top end Galaxy S5 is selling worse than the S4.

Their flagship S5 was outsold by Apples 5C.

Their total phones are down 4%

 

We are nearing the point where all Android phones will be commoditized.  There will be no reason to buy a copycat $700 Samdung when you can buy a copycat $200 Chinese phone that is just as good.  I'd argue that some of the Xiaomi phones look better than Samdung at half the price.

 

I predict in 12-18 months (basically by next holiday season) the premium Android market ($600+) will be basically on life support.  With nothing differentiating the high end Android phones to the Chinese stuff the market won't be willing to pay double or triple the price.

 

The Android phone market will basically be the WindowsPC market.  The vast majority will buy the cheap crap with a very few opting for the top of the line.  If they want top of the line they will go to Apple.

 

Will be interesting to see what happens in the next year.  

Android phones / tablets might become the "new netbooks."

Faddish, but catering to only the low end of the market where there is zero brand loyalty.

 

The rise of the Chinese middle class is increasing the average Chinese citizen's purchasing power.

And that Chinese middle class is also extremely status-conscious.

They're contributing to the extinction of African elephants.  They just love ivory.

And they'd probably prefer domestic brands or Apple over Samsung.

Will be interesting to see what happens in the next decade or two.

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post #4 of 39

The pie is growing and just looking at unit sales Apple's total is growing as well. That's always a positive.

post #5 of 39
Suspect data,quality from Gartner, IDC, et al. Aside, the profit share changes year over year would be more interesting. Grabbing share at the expense of profit is "easy," but eventually the piper must be paid. The PC business is a classic example, where the profit and margin is owned by a Apple with small albeit growing share.
post #6 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by sog35 View Post
 

SAMDUNG is in huge trouble.

 

Their top end Galaxy S5 is selling worse than the S4.

Their flagship S5 was outsold by Apples 5C.

Their total phones are down 4%

 

We are nearing the point where all Android phones will be commoditized.  There will be no reason to buy a copycat $700 Samdung when you can buy a copycat $200 Chinese phone that is just as good.  I'd argue that some of the Xiaomi phones look better than Samdung at half the price.

 

I predict in 12-18 months (basically by next holiday season) the premium Android market ($600+) will be basically on life support.  With nothing differentiating the high end Android phones to the Chinese stuff the market won't be willing to pay double or triple the price.

 

The Android phone market will basically be the WindowsPC market.  The vast majority will buy the cheap crap with a very few opting for the top of the line.  If they want top of the line they will go to Apple.

 

I agree with you.  I wouldn't be too quick to crow about it though, because it won't help Apple sell phones that cost 2 times what these commoditised android hardware flagships are selling for, it will just make Apple's premium pricing even harder to swallow.

 

My son needs a new phone.  I was looking at getting him the 1+ One which is touted as an affordable flagship killer.  The 16 Gb version of this phone is $299 while the 64Gb model is $350.  These prices are for top end hardware specs and decent build quality (possibly)  The availability of such a bargain does not make me suddenly inclined to say 'that's a fantastic bargain , but it's too cheap, I'd rather pay nearly double that for an iPhone', quite the reverse.  It makes me more inclined to view the iPhone as over priced.

 

The 1+ One isn't really available so I ditched that idea and have ordered an LG G2 instead.

post #7 of 39
See, @Tallest Skil? Samsung is winnnnnnning. Every smartphone company should be comparing themselves to Sammy in their advertising, and not the number two company, Apple. Weird, right? It's almost as if Apple was number one and everyone wanted to beat Apple. But analysts say Apple is number two...hmmmm.

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post #8 of 39
Lets revisit this subject after iphone 6 is out ! 1wink.gif
post #9 of 39
As has been shown time and time again, all data from IDC, which is what is being used in this bulls**t article is skewed, manipulated data and is entirely useless for anything. Period!

I continue to wonder why appleinsider.com continues to put up these contrived writers' work ...


Madison
post #10 of 39
IDC has really just recategorized feature phones sold for a pittance as smart phones. Good luck with that one.
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post #11 of 39

How about an in depth study of the turnover of phones and how long they are used once purchased.  My personal assumption would be a majority of iPhone's sold are still in use 4-5 years later verses Android "devices" that will not see that type of lifespan.  What % of those sold are still in use for the different brands...now that would be interesting.

post #12 of 39
http://fortune.com/2014/07/28/pc-sales-estimates-how-the-sausage-gets-made/
Quote:
“So, the mantra became, preserve the growth rates; to hell with the actual numbers. Even the growth rates are fiction. The fudge is in the “others” category, which is used as a plug to make the numbers work out. In fairness, we did do survey work, calling around, and attending white box conferences and venues to try to get a feel for that market, but in the end, the process was political. I used to tell customers which parts of the data they could trust, essentially the major vendors by form factor and region. The rest was garbage.”
post #13 of 39
Is it really a "smartphone" when its used like a feature phone with a large display?

Until a low cost manufacturer starts impacting actual iPhone sales growth, AND MAKES A PROFIT DOING SO, I am not concerned. Losing profits/cash in a marketshare grab is not a sustainable business model.
post #14 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by sog35 View Post

SAMDUNG is in huge trouble.

Their top end Galaxy S5 is selling worse than the S4.
Their flagship S5 was outsold by Apples 5C.
Their total phones are down 4%

We are nearing the point where all Android phones will be commoditized.  There will be no reason to buy a copycat $700 Samdung when you can buy a copycat $200 Chinese phone that is just as good.  I'd argue that some of the Xiaomi phones look better than Samdung at half the price.

I predict in 12-18 months (basically by next holiday season) the premium Android market ($600+) will be basically on life support.  With nothing differentiating the high end Android phones to the Chinese stuff the market won't be willing to pay double or triple the price.

The Android phone market will basically be the WindowsPC market.  The vast majority will buy the cheap crap with a very few opting for the top of the line.  If they want top of the line they will go to Apple.

Your calling doom a little too quickly for Samsung, though their quarter wasn't up to snuff it's not like their in the black. Before you start with such predictions, give it at least a year. As far as people stopping with high end Android phone purchases there is absolutly no proof to back that up. Yes China has been very successful in producing quality handsets at a bargain but their not available without jumping through hoops in Europe or the U.S., especially by any mobile provider. Nor will company's like HTC, Samsung, LG, Sony, etc. stand still and allow an influx of these handsets to make it into these markets without so much as a fight. Also not everyone who owns an Android device secretly want an iPhone, the Android OS has many features that just aren't available in iOS. Personally I have avoided the iPhone because them, though version 8 of iOS looks to be the one that I might finally embrace. That is if I can choose my own browser as a default, handset has more then 1GB of RAM and a filemanager where I can access not only my local files but all of my cloud storage from a single app (this is very important to me and I won't compromise). I would also like to see my home directly when I plug the phone into my computer.
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post #15 of 39
So are these Others the no name brands, cheap POS, or something else Apple chooses not to compete with.

Also what are the definition of smartphones these companies use?
post #16 of 39
In a few years there will be two smartphone markets: 1) Apple selling premium iPhones with a healthy profit, and 2) cheap, generic Android phones that make no profit. The Samsung brand will be just another drop in the Android ocean.

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post #17 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by Relic View Post


Your calling doom a little too quickly for Samsung, though their quarter wasn't up to snuff it's not like their in the black. Before you start with such predictions, give it at least a year. As far as people stopping with high end Android phone purchases there is absolutly no proof to back that up. Yes China has been very successful in producing quality handsets at a bargain but their not available without jumping through hoops in Europe or the U.S., especially by any mobile provider. Nor will company's like HTC, Samsung, LG, Sony, etc. stand still and allow an influx of these handsets to make it into these markets without so much as a fight. Also not everyone who owns an Android device secretly want an iPhone, the Android OS has many features that just aren't available in iOS. Personally I have avoided the iPhone because them, though version 8 of iOS looks to be the one that I might finally embrace. That is if I can choose my own browser as a default, handset has more then 1GB of RAM and a filemanager where I can access not only my local files but all of my cloud storage from a single app (this is very important to me and I won't compromise). I would also like to see my home directly when I plug the phone into my computer.

 

The proof is coming in with Samsung actually reporting a quarter-over-quarter DECLINE in revenue and seeing their margins squeezed. This is not a mere leveling off of growth, which the analysts used to crucify Apple beginning two years ago, but actual revenue declines. These unit decline estimates merely follow on from what Samsung actually reports (recall that unlike Apple, Samsung does not report actual smartphone unit shipments or sales). In an overall market that has continued growing, Samsung has gone into decline.

 

Where does Samsung differentiate themselves from other high end Android OEMs and fast rising Chinese Android OEMs? Their advantages came from massive production economies of scale and a marketing budget that outsizes nearly all of the other smartphone OEMs combined. While the analysts obsess over the comparative numbers with Apple, Samsung's real battle will be against other Android OEMs. This is where their strategy of trying to cover every conceivable market segment will come back to haunt them.

 

Their overall numbers include low margin, low end models, where they are now losing ground to Chinese OEMs in a big way. And the high end segment is no longer growing fast enough to make up for the steep losses Samsung now takes in the lower end. This poor showing occurred during the introductory quarter for the Galaxy S5, which makes the numbers all the more disastrous for them. Consider that Apple still showed year-over-year growth in a quarter where new high end Android models came into the market, and iPhone demand starts tapering off in anticipation of the new models coming out in September.

 

With cheap Chinese Android OEMs on the rise and poised to make a big push into developed markets, this puts additional pressure on established Android OEMs, and Samsung in particular. With more US carriers now pushing BYOD and contract-free plans, the hoops that you speak of are much less of an obstacle than they were even a year ago.

 

Because they control their own platform and have gone into exotic materials in a way that even Samsung cannot follow, Apple is less vulnerable to this kind of channel flooding.


Edited by Woochifer - 7/29/14 at 2:59pm
post #18 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by jungmark View Post

So are these Others the no name brands, cheap POS, or something else Apple chooses not to compete with.

Also what are the definition of smartphones these companies use?

As indicated in that Fortune link, I suspect that the "other" category is just a catch all where the unaccounted-for data winds up. It could also include any number of white-labeled feature phone replacement models that have a touchscreen, but otherwise can barely function as a smartphone.

post #19 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by Relic View Post

That is if I can choose my own browser as a default, handset has more then 1GB of RAM and a filemanager where I can access not only my local files but all of my cloud storage from a single app (this is very important to me and I won't compromise). I would also like to see my home directly when I plug the phone into my computer.
Apple will probably never let you browse the IOS file system, but you could always jailbreak the phone.
post #20 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by jd_in_sb View Post

In a few years there will be two smartphone markets: 1) Apple selling premium iPhones with a healthy profit, and 2) cheap, generic Android phones that make no profit. The Samsung brand will be just another drop in the Android ocean.

Sad world we live in right now.

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post #21 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hexclock View Post


Apple will probably never let you browse the IOS file system, but you could always jailbreak the phone.

I don't need the entire file system, just my home directory.

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post #22 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by Relic View Post

Sad world we live in right now.

How is it nobody else sees that?
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post #23 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by cnocbui View Post

I agree with you.  I wouldn't be too quick to crow about it though, because it won't help Apple sell phones that cost 2 times what these commoditised android hardware flagships are selling for, it will just make Apple's premium pricing even harder to swallow.

Every successful business has a monopoly on something. Even if only a perceived something: that's really all that matters when it comes to buying decisions.

For Apple iPhone users, it's the iOS UX (with Continuity coming soon), iMessage, FaceTime, iTunes, and App Store ecosystems.

This is why Samsung wants to control more of its phone's UX, features, and ecosystem (with something like Tizen) instead of competing with other manufacturers to offer Google's UX, services, and ecosystem. Listen to what hardcore Android fans want: "commoditized Android phone" running "stock Android OS"... That is a future where Samsung's role is reduced to just another Android OEM, forced to compete on price with the Huaweis of the world. Where will that leave Samsung? HP and Dell and Sony can attest to what happens when you sign up to sell someone else's OS, someone else's app ecosystem. Profit margins fall, and the hardware becomes interchangeable, relatively undifferentiated. You can have huge marketshare like HP and barely make enough profit to stay in the game, cutting corners to beat the other guy in a race to the bottom of the commodity hardware barrel. And when you cut enough corners, Apple's platform suddenly looks really, really unique, different, better, the way the Mac looks against commodity PCs.

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"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

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post #24 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by Suddenly Newton View Post

Every successful business has a monopoly on something. Even if only a perceived something: that's really all that matters when it comes to buying decisions.

For Apple iPhone users, it's the iOS UX (with Continuity coming soon), iMessage, FaceTime, iTunes, and App Store ecosystems.

This is why Samsung wants to control more of its phone's UX, features, and ecosystem (with something like Tizen) instead of competing with other manufacturers to offer Google's UX, services, and ecosystem. Listen to what hardcore Android fans want: "commoditized Android phone" running "stock Android OS"... That is a future where Samsung's role is reduced to just another Android OEM, forced to compete on price with the Huaweis of the world. Where will that leave Samsung? HP and Dell and Sony can attest to what happens when you sign up to sell someone else's OS, someone else's app ecosystem. Profit margins fall, and the hardware becomes interchangeable, relatively undifferentiated. You can have huge marketshare like HP and barely make enough profit to stay in the game, cutting corners to beat the other guy in a race to the bottom of the commodity hardware barrel. And when you cut enough corners, Apple's platform suddenly looks really, really unique, different, better, the way the Mac looks against commodity PCs.

So then why did Palm fail, and BB failing fast? They had their own ecosystem, and unique UI/UX.
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post #25 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by Relic View Post

I don't need the entire file system, just my home directory.
Perhaps I misread your post. I would love that feature without question. I send audio and midi files back and forth with various people. Being able to see (and sort by file type) all my mail attachments and my Dropbox (or equivalent) content simultaneously would be fantastic.
post #26 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by dasanman69 View Post


So then why did Palm fail, and BB failing fast? They had their own ecosystem, and unique UI/UX.

Did either of them have factories, assembly workers, R&D departments, chip foundries, etc.. to build their smartphones from beginning to end? Big difference being able to build your own mobile devices and not dependant upon a Chinese factory to churn out several independent parts, subject to delays and mismanagement. 

This is one of the main reasons why Samsung is able to sell nearly as many smartphones as the other top 5 companies combined, every single quarter. Gonna take a long time before Samsung 'fails'. Probably about as long as it will take Apple to fail. 

post #27 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lloydbm4 View Post

Did either of them have factories, assembly workers, R&D departments, chip foundries, etc.. to build their smartphones from beginning to end? Big difference being able to build your own mobile devices and not dependant upon a Chinese factory to churn out several independent parts, subject to delays and mismanagement. 
This is one of the main reasons why Samsung is able to sell nearly as many smartphones as the other top 5 companies combined, every single quarter. Gonna take a long time before Samsung 'fails'. Probably about as long as it will take Apple to fail. 

I don't know, but what does that have to do with a ecosystem, and UX/UI?
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post #28 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by cnocbui View Post
 

 

I agree with you.  I wouldn't be too quick to crow about it though, because it won't help Apple sell phones that cost 2 times what these commoditised android hardware flagships are selling for, it will just make Apple's premium pricing even harder to swallow.

 

My son needs a new phone.  I was looking at getting him the 1+ One which is touted as an affordable flagship killer.  The 16 Gb version of this phone is $299 while the 64Gb model is $350.  These prices are for top end hardware specs and decent build quality (possibly)  The availability of such a bargain does not make me suddenly inclined to say 'that's a fantastic bargain , but it's too cheap, I'd rather pay nearly double that for an iPhone', quite the reverse.  It makes me more inclined to view the iPhone as over priced.

 

The 1+ One isn't really available so I ditched that idea and have ordered an LG G2 instead.

 

One major reason why I won't allow Android on any network I control:

 

http://appleinsider.com/articles/14/07/29/new-android-fake-id-flaw-empowers-stealthy-new-class-of-super-malware-

 

I wouldn't get my kids an Android for whatever reason. Far too risky.

post #29 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hexclock View Post

Perhaps I misread your post. I would love that feature without question. I send audio and midi files back and forth with various people. Being able to see (and sort by file type) all my mail attachments and my Dropbox (or equivalent) content simultaneously would be fantastic.

Exactly, I use my iPad exclusively for music apps and right now its an absolute pain in the butt dealing with files associated with those apps, specifically midi and raw WAV. I understand why Apple won't allow you to see the home directly when connected to a computer, their agressivly trying to avoid side loading media files, they want their users buying from iTunes. However why not the device itself, with every other mobile gadget I own, I always start off in the file manager, I click on a file, a menu pops down and I choose the program I want to open it with, awesome. I can log into every cloud storage I have, local, my NAS, copy files between them, back stuff up, send the file to an email address within the file manger app, list goes on and on. I'm hoping that now that Apple is putting more effort into Enterprise they will eventually start supporting this, I mean they have to right, how are users supposed to get their files from shared Samba servers without one. Just give me ES File Explorer for iOS and I will be the happiest person in the world, would even stop using my Nexus 10, well maybe not as its the best media player that I own but I would defiantly start using my iPad more.
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post #30 of 39

If you look at the market share of only the top 5, Apple went up from 21.91% to 21.94%.  While admittedly a miniscule percentage, IDC seems to hate Apple, and padded the "Other" numbers - which can NEVER be verified, to make it look like Apple lost a good percentage.  Way to skew the numbers!

post #31 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by cnocbui View Post

I agree with you.  I wouldn't be too quick to crow about it though, because it won't help Apple sell phones that cost 2 times what these commoditised android hardware flagships are selling for, it will just make Apple's premium pricing even harder to swallow.

My son needs a new phone.  I was looking at getting him the 1+ One which is touted as an affordable flagship killer.  The 16 Gb version of this phone is $299 while the 64Gb model is $350.  These prices are for top end hardware specs and decent build quality (possibly)  The availability of such a bargain does not make me suddenly inclined to say 'that's a fantastic bargain , but it's too cheap, I'd rather pay nearly double that for an iPhone', quite the reverse.  It makes me more inclined to view the iPhone as over priced.

The 1+ One isn't really available so I ditched that idea and have ordered an LG G2 instead.

Yuck, I wouldn't touch LG or Samsung owing to experiences having to support their devices, and the extremely high return/warranty repair rate. I'm not sure if things have changed since, but a quick search on Google suggests LG/Samsung have their fingers in way too many pies to actually engineer solid products. I'll also point out again the correlation is that these devices were given away for free or almost free, hence many people were getting them thinking they were getting the latest phone when the reality is that it's just the same parts they were using last year in some other market but on the US frequencies. The carrier isn't going to subsidize a 900$ smartphone, which they make 50$ on when they can sell a 600$ smartphone on a two year contract that only cost them 80$ wholesale.

The US wireless system is just one large Ponzi scheme, you're better off just buying the device you want at full price, and keeping it for 5-8 years, than being forced into the 18 month disposablility cycle that Android phones are horribly stuck in.
post #32 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by cnocbui View Post
 

 

I agree with you.  I wouldn't be too quick to crow about it though, because it won't help Apple sell phones that cost 2 times what these commoditised android hardware flagships are selling for, it will just make Apple's premium pricing even harder to swallow.

 

My son needs a new phone.  I was looking at getting him the 1+ One which is touted as an affordable flagship killer.  The 16 Gb version of this phone is $299 while the 64Gb model is $350.  These prices are for top end hardware specs and decent build quality (possibly)  The availability of such a bargain does not make me suddenly inclined to say 'that's a fantastic bargain , but it's too cheap, I'd rather pay nearly double that for an iPhone', quite the reverse.  It makes me more inclined to view the iPhone as over priced.

 

The 1+ One isn't really available so I ditched that idea and have ordered an LG G2 instead.

 

In the long run the LG will cost more.  Most iPhones last 4-5 years while most Androids last 2 years.  Plus the resale value of 2 year old iPhones is much higher than the LG.  In two years the LG will be worthless.  You can still sell 2 year old iPhone5 for $300 on ebay. 

 

Not to mention the risk of malware, hacking, spyware is much higher on an Android device.  Not to mention that most Android phones stop getting OS updates after 12 months, thus many of your favorite apps may no longer work after 1 year.

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post #33 of 39
You lost me as soon as you said IDC. Moving on.
post #34 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by sog35 View Post

Not to mention that most Android phones stop getting OS updates after 12 months, thus many of your favorite apps may no longer work after 1 year.

I had to duck to avoid that load of BS. lol.gif
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post #35 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by sog35 View Post
 

 

In the long run the LG will cost more.  Most iPhones last 4-5 years while most Androids last 2 years.  Plus the resale value of 2 year old iPhones is much higher than the LG.  In two years the LG will be worthless.  You can still sell 2 year old iPhone5 for $300 on ebay. 

 

Not to mention the risk of malware, hacking, spyware is much higher on an Android device.  Not to mention that most Android phones stop getting OS updates after 12 months, thus many of your favorite apps may no longer work after 1 year.

If you leave it to the manufacture, then yes, most Android phones last 2 years. If you update it yourself, 5 plus years, no problem. Samsung and LG both have plug'n play flashing software, its as easy as plugging in your phone, download a Rom and click flash. There is no longer a need for special software or hacking, any Joe Some can do it. For instance the original Android phone the G1 has a few Android 4.2.2 ROMs available and their actually working on a Kit Kat release because it requires less memory, yes it'll probably run slow but you can still keep it going as long as you want. As far as build quality is concerned, well if you buy a cheap phone then it probably won't last long but something like a Samsung S2 or LG G1 will easily last just as long as an iPhone without problems, probably longer as you don't have the screen cracking problem and you can replace the battery and if you do need a new glass, it costs less then 30 bucks on eBay to get a mew one. My white S2 also looks like the day I bought it, I still goof around on it, mostly use it for the MIUI ROM, which is probably one of the coolest custom Android ROM out their. I also have an HTC desire with slide out keyboard which is in pristine condition and though there is Kit Kat 4.4.4 version available, I'm using Sailfish instead. There is also CyanogenMod who have breathed new life into older Android phones, even offering over the air updates, so once you flash your phone you'll get at least 5 years of updates.

 

I've said this before but I have never had a single Malware infection on any of my Android phones, ever, if you follow proper security protocol, ie don't side load apps, you should be fine. These Malware infections come from little crappy apps that a user has no business installing, when you stay with main stream apps, again you won't have a problem. 


Edited by Relic - 7/30/14 at 2:52pm
When I looked up "Ninjas" in Thesaurus.com, it said "Ninja's can't be found" Well played Ninjas, well played.
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When I looked up "Ninjas" in Thesaurus.com, it said "Ninja's can't be found" Well played Ninjas, well played.
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post #36 of 39
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Originally Posted by gilly33 View Post

You lost me as soon as you said IDC. Moving on.


But next week when the data is favorable to Apple, IDC will again be in your good graces.

When I looked up "Ninjas" in Thesaurus.com, it said "Ninja's can't be found" Well played Ninjas, well played.
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When I looked up "Ninjas" in Thesaurus.com, it said "Ninja's can't be found" Well played Ninjas, well played.
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post #37 of 39
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Originally Posted by Misa View Post


Yuck, I wouldn't touch LG or Samsung owing to experiences having to support their devices, and the extremely high return/warranty repair rate. I'm not sure if things have changed since, but a quick search on Google suggests LG/Samsung have their fingers in way too many pies to actually engineer solid products. I'll also point out again the correlation is that these devices were given away for free or almost free, hence many people were getting them thinking they were getting the latest phone when the reality is that it's just the same parts they were using last year in some other market but on the US frequencies. The carrier isn't going to subsidize a 900$ smartphone, which they make 50$ on when they can sell a 600$ smartphone on a two year contract that only cost them 80$ wholesale.

The US wireless system is just one large Ponzi scheme, you're better off just buying the device you want at full price, and keeping it for 5-8 years, than being forced into the 18 month disposablility cycle that Android phones are horribly stuck in.

 

Thank you for your concern but I am in Ireland and I have never had a phone on contract and always buy them outright.  Sorry, but my experience is that Samsung engineer solid products.  The phone my son currently has is a Samsung Jet which has seen constant use for 5 years.  I still use my Samsung Wave which is 4 years old, is still going strong and is in very good condition.  The perpetual stream of bias-informed misinformation on AI about the supposedly shoddy build quality of non-Apple products is tiresome.  The wave has an almost entirely metal body, gorilla glass 2 screen and a camera that Apple couldn't equal till the 4S came out, not to mention Apple have never made a phone that could touch it for battery life.

 

The 5 year old jet has a 301 ppi screen and therefore had a 'retina' class display before Apple coined the term and came out with the 4.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by sog35 View Post
 

 

In the long run the LG will cost more.  Most iPhones last 4-5 years while most Androids last 2 years.  Plus the resale value of 2 year old iPhones is much higher than the LG.  In two years the LG will be worthless.  You can still sell 2 year old iPhone5 for $300 on ebay. 

 

Not to mention the risk of malware, hacking, spyware is much higher on an Android device.  Not to mention that most Android phones stop getting OS updates after 12 months, thus many of your favorite apps may no longer work after 1 year.

 

I asked him if he wanted an iPhone and he said he didn't.  You have been listening to DED - I can tell.  :-)

 

I am not interested in the resale value as I would expect my son will likely use it till it no longer functions.  He is currently doing IT at university and a major reason for getting him the G2 is so that he has a more modern device that is more relevant to the modern phone OS environment and App development.  I happen to have already seen mention of people running the G3 firmware on the G2 so I am not too worried about it being obsoleted within 12 months - which, by the way, is exactly what Apple did to my daughter's ipod Touch, so touting Apple as a paragon of virtue in that regard doesn't wash with me.

post #38 of 39
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Originally Posted by Hexclock View Post

Perhaps I misread your post. I would love that feature without question. I send audio and midi files back and forth with various people. Being able to see (and sort by file type) all
my mail attachments and my Dropbox (or equivalent) content simultaneously would be fantastic.

Something like that in iOS 8.
I wanted dsadsa bit it was taken.
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I wanted dsadsa bit it was taken.
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post #39 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by cnocbui View Post

Thank you for your concern but I am in Ireland and I have never had a phone on contract and always buy them outright.  Sorry, but my experience is that Samsung engineer solid products.  The phone my son currently has is a Samsung Jet which has seen constant use for 5 years.  I still use my Samsung Wave which is 4 years old, is still going strong and is in very good condition.  The perpetual stream of bias-informed misinformation on AI about the supposedly shoddy build quality of non-Apple products is tiresome.  The wave has an almost entirely metal body, gorilla glass 2 screen and a camera that Apple couldn't equal till the 4S came out, not to mention Apple have never made a phone that could touch it for battery life.

The 5 year old jet has a 301 ppi screen and therefore had a 'retina' class display before Apple coined the term and came out with the 4.


I asked him if he wanted an iPhone and he said he didn't.  You have been listening to DED - I can tell.  :-)

I am not interested in the resale value as I would expect my son will likely use it till it no longer functions.  He is currently doing IT at university and a major reason for getting him the G2 is so that he has a more modern device that is more relevant to the modern phone OS environment and App development.  I happen to have already seen mention of people running the G3 firmware on the G2 so I am not too worried about it being obsoleted within 12 months - which, by the way, is exactly what Apple did to my daughter's ipod Touch, so touting Apple as a paragon of virtue in that regard doesn't wash with me.

Ireland's IT courses are heavily java centric. However the jobs available are equally Android and iOS. However your son wants what he is learning. He should try learn what isn't being taught - like swift etc.
I wanted dsadsa bit it was taken.
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