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Schools lament shortcomings of Apple's iPad as some opt instead for Chromebooks - Page 5

post #161 of 374
The decision of this district purchasing compete and utter junk like Chromebooks, and some of the uneducated comments being left here supporting their decision, is astonishing in the negative connotation...

This simply demonstrates an extreme lack of planning by the districts' IT team to identify needs like adding keyboards to the iPads if they intend on the devices being used as laptop replacements. Device management as an argument point against iPads makes me LOL real loud, because this is sheer stupidity. iPads can be easily managed in mass quantities. Those people here claiming otherwise are fools who don't know what they're talking about, or who have never used the multitude of MDM solutions available.

Also, the education materials available for iPads are second to none in quality and educational value, ESPECIALLY when compared against the junk Chromebooks.

If I had a kid and they needed to goto to school with Chromebooks as the primary teaching tool, I'd pull my child out, give their IT manager a few choice words, and pay the extra money needed for my child to get into a private school with proper insight into educational needs and who deploy proper gear.
post #162 of 374
Quote:
Originally Posted by GTR View Post

I totally understand. And I don't think you're alone there.

You didn't mention if you owned an Mac/Linux machines and how the Chromebook maybe compares to them.

A Mac (yes we have one at the shop, circa 06 or 07 I believe and rarely used anymore) and a Chromebook aren't designed for the same market and really aren't comparable IMO.
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post #163 of 374
Yeah, but that's adults talking. I wonder f the kids really miss a physical keyboard.
post #164 of 374
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by GTR View Post

I totally understand. And I don't think you're alone there.

You didn't mention if you owned an Mac/Linux machines and how the Chromebook maybe compares to them.

A Mac (yes we have one at the shop, circa 06 or 07 I believe and rarely used anymore) and a Chromebook aren't designed for the same market and really aren't comparable IMO.

Your shop must be in decline. We have lots of requests for OS X native CS 6 files for translation to other languages. OS X is universally preferred among publishing companies.

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post #165 of 374
Quote:
Originally Posted by pfisher View Post

Chromebook sounds better. I use one as my primary computer and it's awesome.
LOL, primary computer? That's a laugh and a half...
post #166 of 374
My kids are in high school, but they don't take a computer to school. They use one at home, but they don't bring a notebook to school.
post #167 of 374
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

A Mac (yes we have one at the shop, circa 06 or 07 I believe and rarely used anymore) and a Chromebook aren't designed for the same market and really aren't comparable IMO.

 

Okay.

 

To answer your previous question I have an MBA, an iPad, and an iPhone and my usage between the three devices would be approximately 80% iPad, 10% iPhone, and 10% MBA.

 

To be honest, I don't see too many downsides for the iPad (for my personal needs, at least) although, if I was forced to pick one, I'd possibly say weight (you can never lose enough weight from a portable device). I find it to be an excellent around package when you consider the price, build quality, software updates, app selection, support, and security.

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post #168 of 374
If all they are doing on those computers is typing, then perhaps an iPad is a bit of a waste if the form factor is not fully utilized.

For example, instead of droning on about the properties of shapes, why not distribute iPads to the pupils and let them explore for themselves? Let them roam around the school, take photos of their surroundings, and identify the shapes in the pictures using an app like educreations and keynote.

Use a green screen app to film themselves acting out a concept. Record a digital story with educreations. The sky's the limit, though I admit it can be daunting as it can involve overhauling a significant part of the curriculum with what seems like "not teaching".

Not here to sell the iPad, just saying if all the school intends to do is google docs and browsing the web, then yeah, a chrome book is likely a better (and cheaper) alternative.
post #169 of 374

Some interesting Chromebook information:

 

TechRadar believes they need some work:

 

http://www.techradar.com/au/news/mobile-computing/laptops/10-things-google-should-fix-on-the-chromebook-1165837/1#articleContent

 

Forbes wants to know why they aren't being used:

 

http://www.forbes.com/sites/ewanspence/2013/12/30/chromebook-sales-who-is-using-chrome-os-browser-share/

 

The Forbes article begs the question: if they are so great, why are their usage stats so low? Especially for a device designed to be used online.

 

Some interesting miscellaneous impressions:

 

http://chronicle.com/blogs/profhacker/eight-thoughts-on-samsung-chromebook/52029

 

The inability to run Andorid apps at this stage, and internet connection problems, is also ironic.

 

I don't know what the future holds for Chromebooks but I don't think they would make a better replacement than the iPad, especially for education institutions. It seems that they require a bit more development.

 

And, of course, Apple's not going to be standing still while that occurs.

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post #170 of 374
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

What can go wrong with a Chromebook other than total failure? It loads a fresh copy of the OS every time it's cold-booted.

What? How large is that? And what size, are we talking GB's here? Am I to understand that it usually is simply put to sleep? Doesn't need reboots for software installations? Maybe I'm comparing this too much with a 'regular PC' - why is it reinstalling the whole OS? Do you lose any customisations?


Never took a look at what's available for the Chromebook, so I clicked this 1st link. Pointer was on GoAnimate for Schools, so I clicked that without looking, actually. I get a popup, with user feedback:

"John StollMar 18, 2014

I used the free trial and it was good but I can not use it for myself when no one else in class needs it.
Was this review helpful? YesNoMark as spam

copil bogdanDec 22, 2013

why is it advertised as free if the first thing I am requested to do after installing the app is to make an account and pay more than 300 usd?
Was this review helpful? YesNoMark as spam

Peter GiornoMar 22, 2014

I had to have this uninstalled because it was originally advertised as FREE but turns out it was false advertising"


Perhaps it was sorted by 'Most Critical' but I didn't check. I'm sure it's a good device if you've been using it for over 6 months. Are they selling well? I really have no idea.

So I check another app; iPass. It 404'd. Are we certain this Chromebook and its ecosystem is build by the #1 in Internet Services?

Gee, reads like I'm attacking you; sorry if it comes across this way. I can look up the answers myself tomorrow if you don't feel like responding, that's perfectly fine. 5am here; off to bed anyway.
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post #171 of 374
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

Won't happen. Chromebooks are as impervious to viruses and malware as a Mac. Perhaps more so.
The Chromebooks are walking malware devices, thanks to the ToS Google imposes on their use, of both the device, and the related cloud services.

Thanks, but no thanks. And please, DO NOT compare these hunks of crap to Mac's, they are in a completely different universe.
post #172 of 374
Quote:
Originally Posted by sflocal View Post

The chromebookes used in my 13y/o nephew's school system has been a disaster. My nephew always approaches me to help me diagnose/fix his chromebook, resolve WiFi connectivity issues, and spends more time getting fixed (under warranty) than he gets to use it.

Is this what the school system thinks is "useful"?

Yes, you clearly get a better education with a chrome book.  Every student that figures out a chrome book will qualify for a job in IT.

=) silver lining


Edited by ash471 - 8/6/14 at 8:18pm
post #173 of 374
Quote:
Originally Posted by GTR View Post
 

 

Okay.

 

To answer your previous question I have an MBA, an iPad, and an iPhone and my usage between the three devices would be approximately 80% iPad, 10% iPhone, and 10% MBA.

 

To be honest, I don't see too many downsides for the iPad (for my personal needs, at least) although, if I was forced to pick one, I'd possibly say weight (you can never lose enough weight from a portable device). I find it to be an excellent around package when you consider the price, build quality, software updates, app selection, support, and security.

Everyone is different.  I own MBA, iPad, and iPhone and use them 30% iPhone: 60% MBA: and 10% iPad.  Oh and don't forget the Windows virtual machine that my work provides me.  I use that POS about 0.01% of the time (rounding error).

post #174 of 374

Chromebooks are just better for students that need to type. Curriculums exist for all grade levels. Schools just need to approve them and use them. of course they also must pay for them. They exist for iPads and Chromebooks. Chromebooks keep the information in the cloud. Some Chromebooks have touch screens and in time they will have the same capabilities as iPads or other tablets. For now the touch features only allow selecting links and swiping or scrolling. 

 

Without a particular set of lessons for each grade available on these devices they are not very useful as teaching tools. 

post #175 of 374
Quote:
Originally Posted by ash471 View Post

Everyone is different.  I own MBA, iPad, and iPhone and use them 30% iPhone: 60% MBA: and 10% iPad.  Oh and don't forget the Windows virtual machine that my work provides me.  I use that POS about 0.01% of the time (rounding error).

Everyone's uses are most definitely different.

LOL@your POS comment.

I did something similar and ran a Win 7 bootcamp setup on my first MBA in case I ever needed it.

After almost two years of having barely used it I just deleted the damn thing and took back the space.
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post #176 of 374
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Originally Posted by MagMan1979 View Post


LOL, primary computer? That's a laugh and a half...

He must be upgrading from an IBM PC junior.  He's excited he wont have to buy floppy disks for his new Chrome Book. 

post #177 of 374

One of the key advantages an iPad has over other devices, such as Chromebooks, is it's portability.

 

There is a 3rd through 5th grade school in my town where each student has an iPad -- and no text books. The students use the iPads for content AND productivity. For example, a class will go on a field trip with their iPads, do research, photograph, video, sketch, and create reports on the go. Try that with a Chromebook.

 

Many of the teachers at this school have pre-service teachers. The teacher will video lessons given by the pre-service teacher.  With each person in a classroom using an iPad, they become unobtrusive and allows the pre-service teacher to teach the children instead of performing in front of a camera. Afterwards the teacher and pre-service teacher are able to review and analyze the lesson together in a constructive manner. 

 

The elementary students are so adept at using iPads that they are able to teach the pre-service teachers productivity tips.

 

I live in another town a hundred miles away (it might as well be a million) where they decided to purchase Chromebooks instead of iPads so the students have a physical keyboard to take standardized tests. 


Edited by flippysc - 8/6/14 at 8:34pm
post #178 of 374
Quote:
Originally Posted by GTR View Post


Everyone's uses are most definitely different.

LOL@your POS comment.

I did something similar and ran a Win 7 bootcamp setup on my first MBA in case I ever needed it.

After almost two years of having barely used it I just deleted the damn thing and took back the space.

I had Win 7 running on Parallels and deleted it after a few years. I spent way more time installing Win 7 than using it. I bought the version without the install disk and spent several days trying to make a bootable flash drive and get MS to accept the product code.  Didn't work and MS wouldn't provide customer support for the download only version. I finally just repurchased the damn thing on a disk.  I swore on a pile of holy books that I would never buy another MS product again.  Only purchase so far is Office for Mac.  My IT department at work said hell would freeze over before they would let me use a Mac at work.  I started a campaign to get the IT manager fired and now we have Macs at work. =)

post #179 of 374
Quote:
Originally Posted by ash471 View Post

I had Win 7 running on Parallels and deleted it after a few years. I spent way more time installing Win 7 than using it. I bought the version without the install disk and spent several days trying to make a bootable flash drive and get MS to accept the product code.  Didn't work and MS wouldn't provide customer support for the download only version. I finally just repurchased the damn thing on a disk.  I swore on a pile of holy books that I would never buy another MS product again.  Only purchase so far is Office for Mac.  My IT department at work said hell would freeze over before they would let me use a Mac at work.  I started a campaign to get the IT manager fired and now we have Macs at work. =)

LOL

Remind me not to cross you.

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post #180 of 374
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post
 

Those are some good points. There is no exact equivalent of GarageBand but there are a number of web based audio editing applications. You can record video with a Chromebook. Kind of clunky though. You have to have an Internet connection. You go to YouTube and choose upload > record. 

 

Bottom line is neither iPad or Chromebook is a complete solution for education or for anything else either. They both have their pules and minuses. I would guess most people who have an iPad also own a computer. I've never actually seen or used a Chromebook. I do have the entire collection of Apple products.

People in the US that own an iPad probably have a PC. However, the same is not true for developing countries. I know people from China that only use an iPad.

post #181 of 374
seems to me that the issue isn't the iPads so much as the staff. The focus on the lack of a built in physical keyboard sounds like they are trying to use them as laptops, seeing them as 'fun' devices means they aren't doing their research into how they can use the various apps, of which there are a ton that are very educational.

And any issues with adminstration sounds like they didn't do their homework fully on that either. There are lots of ways to lock down the iPads to avoid issues. About the only thing you can't do is block the software update server, which I admit you should be able to do and I hope Apple will add that in the very near future.

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post #182 of 374
Quote:
Originally Posted by crapplingpain View Post

"Marshall's experience with Chrome­books doesn't surprise Bob O'Donnell, who surveyed K–12 Chromebook early adopters for research firm IDC. "We found that the Chromebook's more reliable operation significantly reduced time lost in the classroom due to PC downtime, help desk calls and operating system maintenance," says O'Donnell, IDC's ­program vice president for clients and displays. "This translated to an average savings of $84 per device in productivity."

That proved to be the case for Iowa's Council Bluffs Community School District, which beta-tested 500 Chromebooks for its 9,000 students in early 2011, before they became commercially available to the masses.



According to Director of Information Systems David Fringer, CBCSD teachers "transition frequently from lids up to lids down and back." With Chromebooks, he says, "it takes only four to five seconds before the ­computers are up again."



Today, the district owns about 4,300 Chromebooks. All ninth- through 12th-grade students at CBCSD's two high schools received Chromebooks for the current school year. Students in the other 16 schools also have access to the devices, which are kept on mobile carts. Fringer says the district will expand the one-to-one program to students in grades six through eight during the 2013–2014 school year and to third- through fifth-grade students the following year."



 



http://www.edtechmagazine.com/k12/article/2012/12/why-schools-are-turning-google-chromebooks
I'm sorry, but you're quoting an IDC source in order to attempt to prop up your assertion that Chromebooks are more reliable? The very same IDC that has now been exposed of lying thru it's teeth in order to prop up one statistic over the other, regardless of validity?

You have just discredited as much as O'Donnell, perhaps even more so!
post #183 of 374
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mazda 3s View Post
They got some money and said, "Hey, let's buy some iPads." 


There's no curriculum based on using the iPads

No guidelines

No approved list of apps

NOTHING

 

They basically just threw the iPads at the teachers and said "Make sense of this." As if teachers don't have enough on their plates already than to muck around though the sea of free/fremium apps on the App Store to find something relevant to their students.

 

With that kind of an attitude of course it will be a fail. And that might be why many of these schools are thinking iPads suck. they didn't do their homework

Quote:
Originally Posted by island hermit View Post

The iPad, as complex and wonderful as it is, is not really ready for prime time. Never has been imo.

 

Great for content... not quite up to the task (yet) of workhorse.

 

I give it another 4 or 5 years. Tops.

 

depends on what your work is. I've been using an iPad, no computer, for two straight years at work and it does a hell of a better job than the computer ever did. 

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post #184 of 374
Quote:
Originally Posted by sflocal View Post

The chromebookes used in my 13y/o nephew's school system has been a disaster. My nephew always approaches me to help me diagnose/fix his chromebook, resolve WiFi connectivity issues, and spends more time getting fixed (under warranty) than he gets to use it.

Is this what the school system thinks is "useful"?
Total experience.
Quote:
Originally Posted by johnnybleiss View Post

Weird comparison... if they wanted the "work horse", then they should have bought MacBooks and not iPads...
Schools too cheap for that.
Quote:
Originally Posted by b9bot View Post

Lack of knowledge of administration and the fact you could add a bluetooth keyboard to an iPad obviously had something to do with it. Anyone who knows about iPads and using them in a corporate or school environment should know about how to administrate them properly. Obviously the schools IT has no clue or they would not have run into the problems they claim.
Chromebooks are glorified Network terminals that have no software. I honestly don't see how those actually worked better except they are cheap pieces of crap at about $300.00. That's what those schools were looking for not something that would actually work in a classroom.
Can't wait to hear about the many complaints that will come in when most of them fail, fall apart, or get infected with malware and viruses. Cheap is as cheap does which isn't a whole lot of anything.
The IT department never is ready for iPads, the go for chrome books because there nothing but web.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Suddenly Newton View Post

If I were in school today, I'd rather have a MacBook Air.
As would most.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mazda 3s View Post


Agreed completely. This is a case of districts getting their hands on money and seeing something "shiny" to purchase without first thinking through how these devices will be properly integrated into the classroom environment.
They don't plan there decision on how to use iPads.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

What can go wrong with a Chromebook other than total failure? It loads a fresh copy of the OS every time it's cold-booted, and generally impervious to viruses and malware (because it loads a fresh clean copy of the OS at boot). I suppose there might be occasional wi-fi connectivity issues but what mobile computer doesn't at least once in a great while? It doesn't get much simpler than a Chromebook.
Wifi sucks, your on a tottal web is so you end up do important data on google drive which ends up failing. When a school uses specific app site, is has neither the. App or the plugin for the sight. As well as a school with chrome-books is generally uses crappy wifi to start with that fails so all progress is lost when trying to use the web apps.
post #185 of 374
Quote:
Originally Posted by mytdave View Post

Apple (who's always had this problem) should stop pushing "one size (product) fits all" scenarios on schools (or businesses). 

 

They aren't. It's the schools that are deciding what they want. Not Apple

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post #186 of 374
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mazda 3s View Post


When writing a 15-page research report for you HS class, would you rather use an iPad or a MacBook Air/ThinkPad?


i've done quite a bit of typing on an iPad with a bluetooth keyboard, it's not impossible. Also when teachers really are thinking about using tech to the fullest they don't always come to the conclusion it has to be a typed paper. Maybe for English class where the lesson is how to do a research paper with all the bibliography etc, but in something like history class maybe a paper isn't needed. Many teachers that embrace tech also embrace this idea as well. 

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post #187 of 374
Split screen multitasking or the iPad is dead in two years.
post #188 of 374
Quote:
Originally Posted by jkichline View Post
 

You can already get DOOM for the iPad... 

https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/doom-classic/id336347946?mt=8

 

...and it's a great educational tool too!


I know you mean that as a joke but some games can be used for teaching. A game like Clash of Clans can be an effective way to teach students. 

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post #189 of 374
Lack of knowledge of administrators is the biggest issue here. Also, any story that brings up the LA United district as a reason for not to use iPads instantly loses all credibility. The LA USD roll-out was a disaster from the beginning with an obvious lack of understanding for what they're doing. Just listen to any of their presentations at a conference and you'll become furious seeing their ineptitude. They make all administrators and school district correctly managing iPads and doing transformational learning in the classroom look like morons. Come on, check your facts. That Atlantic story isn't worth the pixels it takes to display...
post #190 of 374
Quote:
Originally Posted by ash471 View Post

I had Win 7 running on Parallels and deleted it after a few years. I spent way more time installing Win 7 than using it. I bought the version without the install disk and spent several days trying to make a bootable flash drive and get MS to accept the product code.  Didn't work and MS wouldn't provide customer support for the download only version. I finally just repurchased the damn thing on a disk.  I swore on a pile of holy books that I would never buy another MS product again.  Only purchase so far is Office for Mac.  My IT department at work said hell would freeze over before they would let me use a Mac at work.  I started a campaign to get the IT manager fired and now we have Macs at work. =)
Good man, could use someone like you in my IT department, one of those classic MS PC-hugging groups that constantly belittles Mac users, when in fact the PC's are the ones having all the problems.
post #191 of 374
Quote:
Originally Posted by wettej01 View Post

Lack of knowledge of administrators is the biggest issue here. Also, any story that brings up the LA United district as a reason for not to use iPads instantly loses all credibility. The LA USD roll-out was a disaster from the beginning with an obvious lack of understanding for what they're doing. Just listen to any of their presentations at a conference and you'll become furious seeing their ineptitude. They make all administrators and school district correctly managing iPads and doing transformational learning in the classroom look like morons. Come on, check your facts. That Atlantic story isn't worth the pixels it takes to display...
THANK YOU!!!

I've followed the LA iPad debacle with absolute disgust at the complete and utter stupidity of their IT managers and administrators. Gotta love it when another article uses that scenario to justify their own stupid mistakes.
post #192 of 374
Quote:
Originally Posted by sflocal View Post

... diagnose/fix his chromebook ...

 

Sounds like a chromebroke.

post #193 of 374
A thought:
Don't know how it works in the US. But in my country it works like this.

A young IT administrator with ambition skills and knowledge of the OSX/iOS platform is one of the most sought after professionals in the private sector, where salaries are usually higher than in the public one.
In the public sector you have, on a higher percentage (not talking about all of them, because I don't like to generalise, but a trend is a trend..) of "older" IT people. Or the ones that have a public job and don't care to stay ahead of the curve.
So they defend Windows XP like it was the best thing ever invented. Because when they learned IT that was the gold standard.
Such people, who happen to work also in major corporations like banks or big multinational companies, are entrenched in their jobs, because of internal politics.
So, basically, if a school district has, let's say, 50 IT people, and deploys iPads what happens?
No viruses, no issues, everything works as smooth as silk if properly set (I have an 8 people company and very rarely needed an IT professional after switching to Mac 6 years ago).
They have a hard time justifying their jobs, or the number of IT people the department employs, moreover their flaws of not knowing the platform become apparent.
When I had problems (with Canon image runner printer drivers) the it professional was basically paid to learn. As he had to search for a fix of a thing he didn't know how to fix.

Public sector jobs, to an extent (in IT to a great extent) are more about justifying the need for the job, than executing.

"We have chromebooks, they are dead cheap and the upfront cost is lower" "they have a ton of problems, so the IT people are running around fixing them"
Result: upfront cost cheap = politicians can brag about how smart they are in keeping costs low.
Lots of problems = the IT department doesn't need to be shrunk, but is already there. So I don't need to take a politically unpopular decision of reducing personnel.

A day of an IT person working on a chromebook problem easily pays an iPad or two.

But politically it is better that way.

You expect a teacher that has tought the same thing for 20+ years, year after year, with the same tools (clamshell notebooks) with the same power point slides and the same notes, to suddenly improve and change? He would be university professor or researcher or work in the private sector.

The school system, such as big corporations, are the toughest places to change.
Apple got a hold in the corporate sector only because the top management demanded their devices to be used at work. And, since they are the ones pulling the strings, no one dared to say "no".
In the public sector the politicians are pulling the strings. And they have, to a great extent, less clues on IT than a 3 year old nowadays. But what they have is a perfect understanding about how voters react and how to present things to voters.

"You see, chromebooks "look" like notebooks, so they are able to do the same thing"
"They are cheaper too"

To buy... Not to maintain. But as we must create jobs nowadays, why should I be the politician that shrinks the huge IT departments? Give them stuff to do, let them be employed...
post #194 of 374
Quote:
Originally Posted by charlituna View Post
 

depends on what your work is. I've been using an iPad, no computer, for two straight years at work and it does a hell of a better job than the computer ever did. 

 

Don't leave us hanging. Tell us what you do with your iPad at work.

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post #195 of 374
Quote:
Originally Posted by GTR View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by ash471 View Post

I had Win 7 running on Parallels and deleted it after a few years. I spent way more time installing Win 7 than using it. I bought the version without the install disk and spent several days trying to make a bootable flash drive and get MS to accept the product code.  Didn't work and MS wouldn't provide customer support for the download only version. I finally just repurchased the damn thing on a disk.  I swore on a pile of holy books that I would never buy another MS product again.  Only purchase so far is Office for Mac.  My IT department at work said hell would freeze over before they would let me use a Mac at work.  I started a campaign to get the IT manager fired and now we have Macs at work. =)

LOL

Remind me not to cross you.

1wink.gif
That shouldn't be a LOL, he couldn't get what he wanted so he started a campaign to get someone fired!
Your selfishness quotient must be through the roof and I pity your colleagues if that's how you work.
post #196 of 374
Quote:
Originally Posted by singularity View Post

That shouldn't be a LOL, he couldn't get what he wanted so he started a campaign to get someone fired!
Your selfishness quotient must be through the roof and I pity your colleagues if that's how you work.

Okay.

I reverse my position on the LOL.

And a LOL reversed is...oh shit...it still spells LOL!
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If you value privacy you can now set DuckDuckGo as your default search engine in iOS and OS X.
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post #197 of 374
Quote:
Originally Posted by charlituna View Post

They aren't. It's the schools that are deciding what they want. Not Apple

Reminds me of that quote by Steve Jobs at All Things Digital, D8:

"With the enterprise market, it's not so simple. The people that use the products don't decide for themselves, and the people that make those decisions sometimes are confused..."
If you value privacy you can now set DuckDuckGo as your default search engine in iOS and OS X.
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If you value privacy you can now set DuckDuckGo as your default search engine in iOS and OS X.
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post #198 of 374
Quote:
Originally Posted by dasanman69 View Post

Re-rebuttal: So what did you use to type your comment? 1wink.gif

The answer is 'fingers'.

What do I win?
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post #199 of 374
Quote:
Originally Posted by sog35 View Post

What can you do on a chromebook besides surfing the web, email, and google docs?

I'm being serious here.


Web apps of course silly. I like the ChromeBook, though an inexpensive laptop could do the same thing. What makes ChromeBook appealing to schools besides price is that children can't manipulate anything on the system, do to it's secure boot everytime it boots up it reverts any system files that have changed back to it's original state, super fast boot times, 6 seconds or less, no virus's, little in the way of IT administration, their are a mass amounts of online educational web apps, teachers can easily create study materials using an absolute plefora of online educational creation tools, making things like tests very simple to make without any prior programming knowledge, multi user login, something that the iPad simply doesn't offer, etc. http://www.proprofs.com/quiz-school/ http://www.elearningart.com/Default.asp

Online apps are vastly becoming as good as their desktop counterparts and are popping up by the hundreds each month, here is a list of online apps for you to try.

Onedrive with Office Online, including; Word, Excel, PowerPoint, OneNote, OutLook, Calendar and of course online storage.

https://onedrive.live.com/about/en-us/ or https://office.com/start/default.aspx

Zoho, this is an incredible site, they have pretty much everything you need to run a business from the web. Word processor, spreadsheet, CRM, time sheets, billing, web site creator, invoice creation, you name it they have it and with over 10 million active users they are also extremely popular, I recommend spending a little exploring of their offerings.

https://www.zoho.com

ICloud, yep works great on a Chromebook, with Pages, Numbers, Keynote, Calendar, Mail, Notes, etc. Their cloud apps are extremely powerful which means like Office online, Chrome Docs and Zoho you can get real work done.

https://www.apple.com/iwork-for-icloud/

Pixlr, a fantastic photo editing app, not as in depth as Photoshop but pretty great none the less. Their shouldn't be anything you can't get accomplished with this online app and I can't recommend it enough.

http://pixlr.com

Photoshop Express Editor, the online version of the very popular Photoshop Express app on iOS. This is just the start for Adobe and I have no doubt we will see a full fledge online version of Photoshop coming soon.

http://www.photoshop.com/tools

Are you a programmer, online IDE's are great, I use them now almost exclusively. Their useful collabortive features, faster compilers as your using off site servers that utilize more powerful systems then your current home machine, intuitive interfaces, make them one of the fastest growing segment in online apps. Here are a few that you must try.

https://c9.com https://codio.com https://shiftedit.net

Audiotool, do you like creating music then this is a must have app for your aresonal. It's so good that you can replace a lot of your current music creation apps as their isn't much you can't accomplish with it, a must try.

http://www.audiotool.com click on app to get started, requires Flash but it's worth it

There are now 1,000's of online apps and would take me a better part of the day to list and give a short description of all of my favorites. Saying there is no apps for the ChromeBook is a gross misunderstanding for the majority of the people in this thread. In reality there isn't much you can't do with a ChromeBook. For more information on the available apps simply visit the Chromestore to get a better understanding.

The iPad is a great tool for learning but so is the Chromebook. Is one better over the other, that depends on the needs of the educator but simply saying a Chromebook is useless is just a biased statement mostly predigrated on this being an Apple site. Especially when little to no research has been done on the matter by it's posters. Check out some of the online educational services, it's mind boggiling to see just how much is available and yes a lot of it could easily be ran on an iPad but for the price a ChromeBook is also a good alternative. Their is absolutely no reason why a school couldn't successfully run a viable program using a ChromeBook.

Here's a good site on the different types of Chrome devices available.
Edited by Relic - 8/7/14 at 1:11am
When I looked up "Ninjas" in Thesaurus.com, it said "Ninja's can't be found" Well played Ninjas, well played.
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When I looked up "Ninjas" in Thesaurus.com, it said "Ninja's can't be found" Well played Ninjas, well played.
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post #200 of 374

Maybe Apple needs to make an iPad with a keyboard, i.e,. an ARM based 11.6" MacBook Air (iBook!), and sell it for a competitive price.

Make it use iOS still, so you don't confuse the market and reduce demand for the standard MacBook Airs.

 

Pricing is always going to be difficult for Apple to compete on, being premium products.

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