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Preorders kick off for Sproutling, a 'Nest' for your child's nursery

post #1 of 68
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Invented by former Apple and Google employees, with the aid of pediatric specialists and Ph.D scientists, Sproutling is the first baby monitor to sense, learn, and predict a baby's behavior, and its creators believe it will make the lives of new parents less stressful.




In the past, baby monitors have been decidedly low-tech, with the best of them being cameras with cloud apps to allow you to remotely view the child on your iPhone' screen. Being the parent of a newborn is really stressful, with not knowing what to expect, worries about the child rolling over, sleeping on its chest, or SIDS (sudden infant death syndrome).

Instead of being solely a device you place on a nighttable in the room, Sproutling is a wearable band and separate environmental sensor. The sensor bowl doubles as the charger for the wearable band.



In the past, there really was no great insight into what to do to help the child sleep better or have a better mood during the day. Sproutling claims to change everything, claiming that the product will help parents understand the optimal bedtime for a child, when they'll wake, and what mood they'll be in, "before you even enter the room."

The company also suggests that by having this level of information, parents won't have to completely change their lives, but can instead integrate babies into their existing lives.




The actual data Sproutling gathers includes:
  • Is baby's heart rate higher or lower than usual?

  • When is the baby most likely to wake?

  • Whether the baby is sleeping on back or chest.

  • If the baby is calm or fussy/angry when she wakes.

  • If it's too bright or loud in the room for the baby to sleep comfortably.

  • If it's warmer or cooler than the baby's ideal temperature.


Sproutling is made of medical-grade silicone, and is washing machine safe with a removable sensor. Charging is wireless, and you charge the device by dropping the wearable band into a charging bowl. The charging bowl acts as an environmental sensor for the room.




The app can be shared with babysitters, family members, and caregivers, and parents can keep an eye on things when they aren't home. Being a new parent is stressful, and many new parents don't go out because leaving the newborn at home is scary, even with a babysittter.

The preorders for Sproutling launched today at Sproutling.com. The baby monitor will retail for $299, while early birds can buy in for $249. Shipments are expected to begin in early 2015.
post #2 of 68
No more kids for me. But if it senses moods and such, could I get one for my wife?
post #3 of 68

Interesting idea- I like it. But are we reinventing the wheel?  Lets discuss

 

  • Is baby's heart rate higher or lower than usual?

  •  

Great information here.  With congenital heart disease being the most common birth defect in the world- where some states are just now requiring heart monitors on baby's for the APGAR test- this is huge.

 

 
  • When is the baby most likely to wake?

This is great too- and a benefit for those who don't track sleep.

 

 
  • Whether the baby is sleeping on back or chest.

Good info- a monitor would show it, but this UI seems easier to decipher than a fuzzy screen with night vision- although every time one of my kids rolled over it gave me a red alert- that'd be slightly annoying.

 

 
  • If the baby is calm or fussy/angry when she wakes.

If you need a monitor for this- you're an idiot.  Of course- if you're a deaf parent, I could see how this could be useful.

 

 
  • If it's too bright or loud in the room for the baby to sleep comfortably.

Meh- you should know.  Now- if this is adaptable and learnable (some kids are light sleepers, some aren't)- this would be pretty cool

 

 
  • If it's warmer or cooler than the baby's ideal temperature.

You should be able to tell easily, but I guess it's a good safeguard.  Particularly during teething on why they might be fussy.

 

 

 

All in all- I like it.  Helicopter moms will faun.  First time parents will swoon.  2nd time parents won't care.

 

 

 

Side note: That commercial is great.  1:13 is hilarious.


Edited by Andysol - 8/7/14 at 8:41am

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post #4 of 68

It looks too much like a criminal's ankle monitor. I'm also not sure how useful this information will all be, or if it will just give paranoid parents a new way to constantly monitor and be overly paranoid. Like Andysol said, you'd expect parents to be able to figure out most of this on their own anyway. As for congenital heart disease, how much of it can be found based on heart rate? I doubt this monitor can track heart sounds.

post #5 of 68

I will be a first time parent in about 6 weeks and I have no interest in this product. There are some good things, but it's too much.

post #6 of 68

I say we just surgically insert trackers, monitors and tattoo bar scans on the back of the heads of every new born. Bring on the whole Apocalypse now instead of beating around the bush with slowly getting society used to this kind of technology. Did I just say that aloud.

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post #7 of 68

I'd be interested in how it actually works. You know, connects to a server on the Internet or direct, or when the baby is at the grandparents' or baby-sitter's house and you are on date night, how do you log in? How does it get through the firewall, privacy, etc. Everyone always wants it to just work. I just want to know how.

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post #8 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by j1h15233 View Post

I will be a first time parent in about 6 weeks and I have no interest in this product. There are some good things, but it's too much.

Congratulations! Get your sleep now- when that kid hits 2-3 weeks- that's when the "fun" starts. 1smile.gif

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post #9 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andysol View Post


Congratulations! Get your sleep now- when that kid hits 2-3 weeks- that's when the "fun" starts. 1smile.gif


Yeah, from what I hear, if you're really lucky, you won't get sleep for another 18 months. If you're not so lucky, you won't get sleep for another 18 years.

post #10 of 68

I've got a 3 year old and I can honestly say that I don't wish I had this and if I have another one, I would not want this.  

post #11 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by LighteningKid View Post
 


Yeah, from what I hear, if you're really lucky, you won't get sleep for another 18 months. If you're not so lucky, you won't get sleep for another 18 years.

 

I like that, well said.  I'll add this - if you get lucky on the first kid and he/she sleeps through the night right away - just know that the 2nd kid won't be as easy.  I speak from personal experience :-)

 

Congrats, btw.

post #12 of 68

I've totally done babies and will never go back but had this been around some 14 years ago I would have bought one, no question. 

post #13 of 68

I am sorry another device which added to the stupification of America. Really you need something to tell you what your baby is doing or about to do. They only do few things, They are usually a wake, eating, sleeping or go to the bathroom and it not this then they are sick and you need to deal with that immediately.

 

You know humans have been having kids for 1000's of years and they have done fine without things like this. You know if you just pay attention to your kids you know what they are up to.

 

You know how this going to work, when they are hungry, a google ads will show up promoting some new baby food, when they crap they will send ads to you which diapers you should buy.

 

I love this feature

 

  • If it's too bright or loud in the room for the baby to sleep comfortably.

 

Really why is this an issue, I grew up living next to two Steel Mills and railroad yard that ran 24/7. I learn to sleep through anything. It is blessing to be able to sleep when it is light or dark or when it is loud.

 

This Feature will drive parents nuts

 

  • Whether the baby is sleeping on back or chest.

 

There are all these opinion on which is best for your kids, and they say on the chest causing things like SIDs, there is not proof that this happens, Can not provide it one way or the other. My son sleep on his chest and my daughter on her back and they both sleep this way from day one. The wife use to worry about my son and flipped him over which only pissed him off and made him a fussy baby until she stop doing it.


Edited by Maestro64 - 8/7/14 at 9:38am
post #14 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by allenbf View Post
 

 

I like that, well said.  I'll add this - if you get lucky on the first kid and he/she sleeps through the night right away - just know that the 2nd kid won't be as easy.  I speak from personal experience :-)

 

Congrats, btw.

I second that. Also from personal experience. 

post #15 of 68

This product is going to do really well, not because it's needed but because new parents are nuts. I have twins and was super-involved from birth on... so so don't write me off as the do-nothing Dad. My girls established a pattern quickly and have *never* had sleeping issues because we researched extensively and were on this from the day they came home.

 

  • Is baby's heart rate higher or lower than usual?

 

- So... what will you do with this data? A Dr's nightmare as they get calls 10 times a day.

 

  • When is the baby most likely to wake?

 

- When you wake them. Start a proper sleeping pattern by being the boss and not allowing "free sleeping". Essential for twins.

 

  • Whether the baby is sleeping on back or chest.

 

- Perhaps the only one with any merit due to the suspected correlation of tummy sleeping with SIDS. Notwithstanding, most Dr.'s still say not to sweat it and let the child sleep. 

 

  • If the baby is calm or fussy/angry when she wakes.

 

- ... so you can arrange your life around the baby, the article suggests. Babies are portable and will do what you want. We never rearranged anything for the girls. Not to mention, the odds of it being right are pretty low.

 

  • If it's too bright or loud in the room for the baby to sleep comfortably.

 

- If the shades are closed (you installed shades, right?) and the light is down (switch? Dimmer?) how can this need adjustment? Let them learn to sleep in loud places.

 

  • If it's warmer or cooler than the baby's ideal temperature.

 

- Really? Paranoid parent. Let them learn to sleep in a variety of conditions and they'll sleep better.

post #16 of 68
I've got mixed feeling about whether a hospital version of this would make sense or not.

* On one hand, having a baby's movement, heart rate and temperature continuously monitored would be great. Those are the things I checked on every four hours. Watching them more closely, especially temperature spikes in immuno-compromised children, would be quite helpful. This'd also be much cheaper than the standard heart and respiration monitors that hospitals use.

* On the other hand, this isn't a situation where parents of healthy kids simply need rest and sleep. These are very sick kids who need someone coming into their room often, looking for something that isn't right. A monitor like this means some nursing staff might sit around when they should be moving around. Not good.

My opinion on a model for hospitals? Have it, but use it selectively and with care. I know when I worked with children who had leukemia, I'd have been happy to get alerts for:

1. Kids who'd kicked off their blankets and were too cold.

2. Kids spiking temperatures. That Q4 check wasn't often enough. Sometimes I could spot a fever by behavior. Sometimes not.

3. A baby or small child without parents waking up and needing attention. Not need for them to cry.

It's also a great idea for parents with older kids who have major medical issues or disabilities. For those, there needs to be a model with a larger band that can't be pulled off.

--Michael W. Perry, My Nights with Leukemia: Caring for Children with Cancer
post #17 of 68
I love seeing new product ideas that are well thought out. I hope and expect this to succeed.

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post #18 of 68

Badass? Feck off.

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post #19 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by barthrh View Post
 

This product is going to do really well, not because it's needed but because new parents are nuts. I have twins and was super-involved from birth on... so so don't write me off as the do-nothing Dad. My girls established a pattern quickly and have *never* had sleeping issues because we researched extensively and were on this from the day they came home.

 

  • Is baby's heart rate higher or lower than usual?

 

- So... what will you do with this data? A Dr's nightmare as they get calls 10 times a day.

 

  • When is the baby most likely to wake?

 

- When you wake them. Start a proper sleeping pattern by being the boss and not allowing "free sleeping". Essential for twins.

 

  • Whether the baby is sleeping on back or chest.

 

- Perhaps the only one with any merit due to the suspected correlation of tummy sleeping with SIDS. Notwithstanding, most Dr.'s still say not to sweat it and let the child sleep. 

 

  • If the baby is calm or fussy/angry when she wakes.

 

- ... so you can arrange your life around the baby, the article suggests. Babies are portable and will do what you want. We never rearranged anything for the girls. Not to mention, the odds of it being right are pretty low.

 

  • If it's too bright or loud in the room for the baby to sleep comfortably.

 

- If the shades are closed (you installed shades, right?) and the light is down (switch? Dimmer?) how can this need adjustment? Let them learn to sleep in loud places.

 

  • If it's warmer or cooler than the baby's ideal temperature.

 

- Really? Paranoid parent. Let them learn to sleep in a variety of conditions and they'll sleep better.

 

The key here is kids will do what you want unless let them do what they want. We took our kids ever where and never had an issue, the learn to adapted and are well balance and easy going today.

 

As some one said parents are nuts, and they read too much. We raised our kids without our parent close by, however, we were lucky to have friend who was older and have a number of her own kids as well as grand kids and she use to yell at us for being nuts and straighten us out quickly.

 

All this device will do is give parents too much information which they do not know what to do with and know if it is important or not.

post #20 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maestro64 View Post
 

 

You know humans have been having kids for 1000's of years and they have done fine without things like this.

 

 

It may be a stupid product (or not - I'm not sure) but this is without a doubt the stupidest argument.  Infant mortality rates before the last century were astronomical - in many places even in North America they were still very high before World War II.  Innovation is the ONLY reason things are "fine" now.

post #21 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by barthrh View Post
 

This product is going to do really well, not because it's needed but because new parents are nuts. I have twins and was super-involved from birth on... so so don't write me off as the do-nothing Dad. My girls established a pattern quickly and have *never* had sleeping issues because we researched extensively and were on this from the day they came home.

 

  • Is baby's heart rate higher or lower than usual?

 

- So... what will you do with this data? A Dr's nightmare as they get calls 10 times a day.

 

  • When is the baby most likely to wake?

 

- When you wake them. Start a proper sleeping pattern by being the boss and not allowing "free sleeping". Essential for twins.

 

  • Whether the baby is sleeping on back or chest.

 

- Perhaps the only one with any merit due to the suspected correlation of tummy sleeping with SIDS. Notwithstanding, most Dr.'s still say not to sweat it and let the child sleep. 

 

  • If the baby is calm or fussy/angry when she wakes.

 

- ... so you can arrange your life around the baby, the article suggests. Babies are portable and will do what you want. We never rearranged anything for the girls. Not to mention, the odds of it being right are pretty low.

 

  • If it's too bright or loud in the room for the baby to sleep comfortably.

 

- If the shades are closed (you installed shades, right?) and the light is down (switch? Dimmer?) how can this need adjustment? Let them learn to sleep in loud places.

 

  • If it's warmer or cooler than the baby's ideal temperature.

 

- Really? Paranoid parent. Let them learn to sleep in a variety of conditions and they'll sleep better.

[citations needed]

post #22 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by joelsalt View Post
 

 

It may be a stupid product (or not - I'm not sure) but this is without a doubt the stupidest argument.  Infant mortality rates before the last century were astronomical - in many places even in North America they were still very high before World War II.  Innovation is the ONLY reason things are "fine" now.

You can look at this way, those kids are only alive today because of medical science, which is also the reason we now have higher rates of older people with medical issues which again medical science is keeping them alive. We are seeing more people today with various medical issue then we ever had in the past. Nature has it ways of keeping species gene pool healthy and humans have been messing with it. Fixing one problem creates another problem, however, if you in the medical field you make money both ways, save a baby which would have died only to live and have future problems. I know it sounds heartless, but you can not argue that humans have altered what nature would have done.

 

Also, babies died for lots of various reason through out history, mostly due to unhealthy living conditions which for the most part is not an issue in the First World country, it still an issue everywhere else and a monitor is not going to solve that problem.

 

This devices plays on new parent fears. It is call FUD marketing, (Fear, Uncertainty and Death or Doubt) and you should always be skeptical of any product which using this marketing technique to sell their product.

post #23 of 68

You're right about most of what you said Maestro, but a couple things:

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by Maestro64 View Post

 

You know humans have been having kids for 1000's of years and they have done fine without things like this.

Always the worst comment regarding anything.  Kids were around for 1000s of years without antibiotics or vaccinations.  Does that make those pointless?  It's the equivalent of "My grandpa smoked every day and lived till 90".  Oh- so that means smoking is fine.

 

To give a better example- kids did fine before baby monitors, but one of those absolutely eased my wife's fears on our 2nd daughter after our first daughter was stillborn.

 

Quote:
 
  • If it's too bright or loud in the room for the baby to sleep comfortably.

 

Really why is this an issue, I grew up living next to two Steel Mills and railroad yard that ran 24/7. I learn to sleep through anything. It is blessing to be able to sleep when it is light or dark or when it is loud.

While I agree completely- what if it learns behaviors?  Example- it gets to x decibel, and that particular child wakes up.  Some are light sleepers some aren't.  I have a media room that is next to a bedroom- itd be nice to know if I go to volume 50, it wakes the kid up, but at volume 40- historically, I'm fine.  It's not completely useless.

 

 

This product isn't for me- but if it makes someone feel "safer"- and they are happy with the purchase- why knock it?

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post #24 of 68

This device is redundant. Babies cry when they need attention. 

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post #25 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by joelsalt View Post
 

[citations needed]

 

I know this wasn't directed at me, but he's pretty spot on.  Citations shouldn't be needed for personal experience.  I have never "tiptoed" around my kids and as a result, they're pretty well rounded and easy going.  On the other hand, I've seen how my sister is raising her kid, catering to her every whim and the kid is a brat.  And then my sister wonders why?

 

In other words, don't let your kids run the house, they're kids.  Treat them with love and respect but be the parent.  And it'll all work out.

post #26 of 68

Kids are pretty annoying, but I recognize that this is a cool product for those that have successfully bred and produced little monsters.

post #27 of 68

None

Quote:
Originally Posted by joelsalt View Post
 

[citations needed]

None needed, since all but one are my own opinion. Feel free to read books by Ferber, Weissbluth, Ford, or others to formulate your own.

 

For the remaining one, I strongly recommend Google.

post #28 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maestro64 View Post
 

You can look at this way, those kids are only alive today because of medical science, which is also the reason we now have higher rates of older people with medical issues which again medical science is keeping them alive. We are seeing more people today with various medical issue then we ever had in the past. Nature has it ways of keeping species gene pool healthy and humans have been messing with it. Fixing one problem creates another problem, however, if you in the medical field you make money both ways, save a baby which would have died only to live and have future problems. I know it sounds heartless, but you can not argue that humans have altered what nature would have done.

I actually have first-hand experience of this.  My 3rd daughter had a chromosome abnormality and a Cong. heart defect.  Open heart surgery at 9 days old, and we spent more time in the hospital than at home during her life.  And when we were at home- we couldn't go anywhere due to her immune system.  A cold would send us back to the hospital.  She passed away at 14 months old Christmas Day 2012.  She's so much better for it.  Ya- it sounds heartless Maestro- and it was the hardest thing we ever did- allowing her to pass away instead of electing for another 4+ surgeries that she likely wouldn't have survived- but her quality of life was terrible.  Constant pain and she had way more fear/sadness than happiness.  We would have been prolonging the inevitable.  Just because we can do something, doesn't mean we should.

 

Now, of course, to be a parent- and to allow your child to die... well, that's easier said than done my friend- and I support those regardless of which way they choose when given the option.  Its an impossible scenario.

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post #29 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andysol View Post
 

Always the worst comment regarding anything.  Kids were around for 1000s of years without antibiotics or vaccinations.  Does that make those pointless?  It's the equivalent of "My grandpa smoked every day and lived till 90".  Oh- so that means smoking is fine.

 

To give a better example- kids did fine before baby monitors, but one of those absolutely eased my wife's fears on our 2nd daughter after our first daughter was stillborn.

 

While I agree completely- what if it learns behaviors?  Example- it gets to x decibel, and that particular child wakes up.  Some are light sleepers some aren't.  I have a media room that is next to a bedroom- itd be nice to know if I go to volume 50, it wakes the kid up, but at volume 40- historically, I'm fine.  It's not completely useless.

 

 

This product isn't for me- but if it makes someone feel "safer"- and they are happy with the purchase- why knock it?

Yeah my dad used 2 pack of smokes a day from 16 to 55 and quit and 5 yrs later the doctor gave him a clean bill of health and he is 85 today. There is a theory out there which say if your genetics where such you were predestine to have a disease then things like smoking and other bad things will only accelerate what was going to happen anyway. There is really no way to provide this since you can not test people and make them smoke and see what happens.

 

On the noise thing,  I've always said I can sleep through WWIII especially if it was going on when I am about to go to sleep, but I am a very light sleeper, I was the first to be up when our kids would begin to wake in the middle of the night. I would be in their rooms before they would be into a full out screaming fit. This is has been proven that parent are very well tuned into their child's cries if they just learn to trust their instincts.

 

I tell people this all the time, shut off everything and pay attention to your kids be a parent first and things will be fine. Like I said in a previous post, we were lucky to have a grandparent type friend to kicks us in the butts and make us realize what is important.


Edited by Maestro64 - 8/7/14 at 10:33am
post #30 of 68

Wife and I just had a baby two months ago. We did a fair amount of ready in preparation (more her than me) and we've been learning as we go (mostly learning to read the baby's signs). We have an Angelcare motion and sound monitor (pad that goes under a board in his crib) that will alert us (and the baby) if he should stop moving while sleeping. As others have said, I think the most important is observing and learning your child's behavior. They will certainly give you clues when they're unhappy about something. Perhaps technology such as this could help us to learn his/her patterns, but I don't believe it should replace observation. It might be good to put new parents more at ease, but I don't think it will help a whole lot with getting more sleep with a newborn (feedings every 2-3 hours).

post #31 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andysol View Post
 

I actually have first-hand experience of this.  My 3rd daughter had a chromosome abnormality and a Cong. heart defect.  Open heart surgery at 9 days old, and we spent more time in the hospital than at home during her life.  And when we were at home- we couldn't go anywhere due to her immune system.  A cold would send us back to the hospital.  She passed away at 14 months old Christmas Day 2012.  She's so much better for it.  Ya- it sounds heartless Maestro- and it was the hardest thing we ever did- allowing her to pass away instead of electing for another 4+ surgeries that she likely wouldn't have survived- but her quality of life was terrible.  Constant pain and she had way more fear/sadness than happiness.  We would have been prolonging the inevitable.  Just because we can do something, doesn't mean we should.

 

Now, of course, to be a parent- and to allow your child to die... well, that's easier said than done my friend- and I support those regardless of which way they choose when given the option.  Its an impossible scenario.

 

I know others who have gone through the same thing or are still dealing with the kids today. My in laws have a 57 yr old Daughter still living with them today because of doctors where able to save her. You spend you entire time saying what if and it very hard and it hard to watch her get worse and worse yr after year.

 

I really issue is the fact too may people place too much importance on things like this and think it will solve some problem and when it fails to do that they want to blame something other than realize it was just going to happen that way.

 

I just think a device like this will provide parent with information overload, especially when the are new parent and should be focusing on the what is important and you child will tell you that in real time. I always said the hardest part about raising kids in realize they changed and we did not, when they babies those changes happen fairly regularly, and they get older the changes happen more slowly so they usually catch you off guard. If you watch for the changes you will be a successful parent.

post #32 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by barthrh View Post
 

None

None needed, since all but one are my own opinion. Feel free to read books by Ferber, Weissbluth, Ford, or others to formulate your own.

 

For the remaining one, I strongly recommend Google.

Isn't it pretty disingenuous to make declarative generalized statements then simply say after the fact its your opinion?  Also, isn't it disingenuous to ad hoc post a few citations and tell someone to formulate an opinion based on information gathered from works, which, say, one might list as a citation, which is simply what I asked for in the first place?

 

And isn't it disingenuous to discredit a device based on an opinion draped in declarative rhetoric when its clear [the company producing the product's] opinion differs and without any evidence on either side its just a pointless he-said-she-said?  What does this add to an informed discussion?

 

Also, does raising 1 child (or 2 or 3) and giving an opinion based on a very small amount of anecdotal evidence seem wise?  The anecdotal evidence I've collected runs very contrary to yours, which is why i'd want citations/evidence to back up these opinions (which I don't have, but I've not made sweeping generalizations about this product in the positive or negative either)

post #33 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by LighteningKid View Post
 

It looks too much like a criminal's ankle monitor. I'm also not sure how useful this information will all be, or if it will just give paranoid parents a new way to constantly monitor and be overly paranoid. Like Andysol said, you'd expect parents to be able to figure out most of this on their own anyway. As for congenital heart disease, how much of it can be found based on heart rate? I doubt this monitor can track heart sounds.

 

Not sure how useful this information will be?!?!?  Come on!!  This is google!!  Very useful information for them.

 

  • Is baby's heart rate higher or lower than usual?  google can sell this information to pediatrician offices to target parents of babies who have irregular heartbeats.
  •  
  • When is the baby most likely to wake?  google can sell this information to coffee companies to allow them to target early-waking baby's parents for that extra cup of joe.
  •  
  • Whether the baby is sleeping on back or chest.  google can sell this information to baby hat manufacturers to target parents of kids with flat heads due to sleeping on their backs.
  •  
  • If the baby is calm or fussy/angry when she wakes.  google can sell this information to anger management class providers or massage therapists for stressed and exhausted parents of fussy/angry babies.
  •  
  • If it's too bright or loud in the room for the baby to sleep comfortably.  google can sell this information to mini-blind or insulation installation companies.
  •  
  • If it's warmer or cooler than the baby's ideal temperature.  google can sell this information to HVAC contractors.

 

See?  Plenty of use for this information!!

post #34 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by joelsalt View Post
 

Isn't it pretty disingenuous to make declarative generalized statements then simply say after the fact its your opinion?  Also, isn't it disingenuous to ad hoc post a few citations and tell someone to formulate an opinion based on information gathered from works, which, say, one might list as a citation, which is simply what I asked for in the first place?

 

And isn't it disingenuous to discredit a device based on an opinion draped in declarative rhetoric when its clear [the company producing the product's] opinion differs and without any evidence on either side its just a pointless he-said-she-said?  What does this add to an informed discussion?

 

Also, does raising 1 child (or 2 or 3) and giving an opinion based on a very small amount of anecdotal evidence seem wise?  The anecdotal evidence I've collected runs very contrary to yours, which is why i'd want citations/evidence to back up these opinions (which I don't have, but I've not made sweeping generalizations about this product in the positive or negative either)

 

Parenting is, even among health professionals, driven very much by opinion. You'll find just as many people who think Ferber is the devil as you'll find who think his books and advice are the best available. I did not declare these points as opinion "after the fact". My post started with a clear disclosure of my experience: two kids. If someone wants to take my advice without evaluating it critically first, then that's their decision (albeit a bad one). My sample size is larger based on my experiences with family, friends and colleagues, but I didn't say that.

 

Importantly, I did not post any "ad hoc citations", with the possible exception of the statement that tummy sleeping correlates with the incidence of SIDS. With thousands of articles supporting that statement, I don't find the need to cite a source in a age where answers are seconds away. Everything else was clearly an opinion that people can read, think about, agree with, disagree with, laud or criticize.

 

Finally, I didn't "discredit" the device. I did not harm it's reputation or imply that it did not work (though I did express suspicion of its ability to forecast moods). I dismissed it based on my opinion and personal experience.

 

In any case, my post has resulting in some interesting discussion. Many people added their own opinions supporting the device or dismissing it as unnecessary; this was the intent, so mission accomplished.

post #35 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by RonMG View Post
 

Not sure how useful this information will be?!?!?  Come on!!  This is google!!  Very useful information for them.

 

  • Is baby's heart rate higher or lower than usual?  google can sell this information to pediatrician offices to target parents of babies who have irregular heartbeats.
  •  
  • When is the baby most likely to wake?  google can sell this information to coffee companies to allow them to target early-waking baby's parents for that extra cup of joe.
  •  
  • Whether the baby is sleeping on back or chest.  google can sell this information to baby hat manufacturers to target parents of kids with flat heads due to sleeping on their backs.
  •  
  • If the baby is calm or fussy/angry when she wakes.  google can sell this information to anger management class providers or massage therapists for stressed and exhausted parents of fussy/angry babies.
  •  
  • If it's too bright or loud in the room for the baby to sleep comfortably.  google can sell this information to mini-blind or insulation installation companies.
  •  
  • If it's warmer or cooler than the baby's ideal temperature.  google can sell this information to HVAC contractors.

 

See?  Plenty of use for this information!!

Perhaps you should try rereading the article. Sprouting is a new company, not part of Google…for now, that is.

Life is too short to drink bad coffee.

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Life is too short to drink bad coffee.

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post #36 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post
 

Perhaps you should try rereading the article. Sprouting is a new company, not part of Google…for now, that is.

 

Ha, sure it is.  With wording like "former Apple and google employees" and a reference to Nest, excuse me for being a bit skeptical of a full disconnect from google.  Apple would never buy into something as small potatoes as this, but google sure will.  It is inevitable, along with the eventual sale of collected information.  Just ask Nest...

post #37 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by RonMG View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post
 

Perhaps you should try rereading the article. Sprouting is a new company, not part of Google…for now, that is.

 

Ha, sure it is.  With wording like "former Apple and google employees" and a reference to Nest, excuse me for being a bit skeptical of a full disconnect from google.  Apple would never buy into something as small potatoes as this, but google sure will.  It is inevitable, along with the eventual sale of collected information.  Just ask Nest...

That wording is just AI click bait which you swallowed hook, line and sinker.

 

Visit their website.

 

There is only one former Google employee on the management team. Most of the others are from Apple, Cisco and One Medical Group.

Life is too short to drink bad coffee.

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Life is too short to drink bad coffee.

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post #38 of 68
I can see Giggle buying this for 3Bn even just for the ex Apple employees.

I might get one cause hey, this is the Facebook age!! I hope version 2 changes diapers. I like how it monitors my baby for me so I could do more important things like post a status("just had my baby boy!!") and get to level 438 on Candy Crush.
post #39 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post
 

That wording is just AI click bait which you swallowed hook, line and sinker.

 

Visit their website.

 

There is only one former Google employee on the management team. Most of the others are from Apple, Cisco and One Medical Group.

 

Mark my words.  They will be google-owned by Dec 2015.  Mark my words.  And that's when the sale of personal information will begin!!

post #40 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by RonMG View Post
 
They will be google-owned by Dec 2015.

Perhaps, but I still think your delusional conspiracy theory is ridiculous. I'm pretty sure that is not how Google works.

 

I seriously doubt Google ever sells your personal information. It is much more useful for them to keep it private. What Google sells is targeted advertising. Without a doubt they develop personal profiles when possible, but it does them no good to sell it to an advertiser who has no way to deliver ads on their own. The advertiser needs Google to deliver the ads based on their custom profile.

 

Google is not going to bother sending you a random ad when they can send you a targeted ad. If Google knows you are interested in a specific topic, they have a better chance of getting a click from you than if they sent you an ad that was completely irrelevant. In a way, you can think of targeted ads as a service. Ads are everywhere. Wouldn't you rather see ads about something you were interested in if you have to see ads anyway?

Life is too short to drink bad coffee.

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