or Connect
AppleInsider › Forums › Mobile › iPhone › 1Password for iOS/Mac gets temporary price cut, upcoming iOS 8 version to be free update [u]
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

1Password for iOS/Mac gets temporary price cut, upcoming iOS 8 version to be free update [u]

post #1 of 97
Thread Starter 
It was announced on Thursday that popular iOS and Mac password management app 1Password is on sale for a limited time, and that a future built-for-iOS 8 version with Touch ID support will be available as a free update for existing users.



In a post to its official blog on Thursday, 1Password developer AgileBits said the price cut to $9.99 comes as the result of a New York Times report on Wednesday that claimed Russian hackers have amassed over one billion Internet passwords.

While the origin and extent of the breached password data is unclear, AgileBits notes users should still have strong protections in place in case their information is one day stolen.

When Apple's next-generation iOS 8 launches this fall, 1Password will be ready with Touch ID support, meaning users will no longer have to remember long pass phrases to open the app. In addition, with iOS 8's app extensions, 1Password can finally see integration with other apps, bringing comprehensive protection to titles like mobile Safari.

The last major 1Password updated came in June, when AgileBits overhauled the app with AirDrop compatibility, better integration with 1Password for Mac and a clean iOS 7-inspired redesign.

1Password weighs in at 14.9MB and is available now for $9.99 from the iOS App Store. The accompanying Mac version is also on sale for for $34.99 on the Mac App Store.

Update: AgileBits has also cut $15 off the price of 1Password for Mac. The article has been updated to reflect this change.
post #2 of 97

I don’t remember why I’d need this over what OS X/iOS does natively. Anyone?

post #3 of 97

I'll be getting my hands on it tomorrow. One for the wife and one for me. Tough remembering passwords these days.

post #4 of 97
This makes me wish Apple offer Mac and iOS app bundles when iOS 8 and Yosemite is released. There will be iOS app bundles though, which is good.

On 1Password.. I love this app!!
post #5 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post
 

I don’t remember why I’d need this over what OS X/iOS does natively. Anyone?

 

1Password (and the Password Manager app I use/love on all my iOS/OSX/Win7 devices - DataVault) is more than a password manager. It is a means of providing secure encrypted storage of information.

It is useless for sheep to pass laws outlawing carnivorism when the wolf is of a different mind.
Reply
It is useless for sheep to pass laws outlawing carnivorism when the wolf is of a different mind.
Reply
post #6 of 97

I have 1Password for my iMac, iPhone and iPad. I just read in the paper today, that a password such as "Ihatepasswords" is  better than "#wsyfgr59sgoa."

 

Oh well.

post #7 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post
 

I don’t remember why I’d need this over what OS X/iOS does natively. Anyone?


Because of the solid integration with all browsers, not just Safari, plus the convenience of telling it a site you want to go to and having it launch your browser, navigate to that site, and log you in with a single click. Also secure storage of credit card info (again, this can be used in browsers other than Safari), software licenses, notes, bank account info (I use it to store my account and routing numbers), membership (gym, auto club, etc), as well as multiple identities (as in, you can populate your address info into an order form with a single click whether it's the address of your home, office, girlfriend, parents, or nemesis).

 

Also, unlike iCloud Keychain, 1Password works. iCloud Keychain is very handy when it does work, but I have found its syncing to be unreliable. 1Password syncs via Dropbox or a number of other methods (including peer-to-peer if you don't want your information, encrypted as it is, routed through a third party).

 

I too was wondering if I would continue to rely on 1Password after Mavericks and I have to say definitively, yes I do.

post #8 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by christopher126 View Post
 

I have 1Password for my iMac, iPhone and iPad. I just read in the paper today, that a password such as "Ihatepasswords" is  better than "#wsyfgr59sgoa."

 

Oh well.


I tend to doubt that the example you give is better -- assuming your definition of better is 'more secure'. The first can be hacked with a dictionary attack whereas the second is totally random an uses a mix of lowercase alpha, numbers and punctuation. By simple reasoning alone your 14 char passwords are made up of a common simple phrase consisting of 3 words (one being the most common password used) whereas the other could be stronger and contain as many english language pairs I would consider it stronger. Care to share your source?

post #9 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by Damn_Its_Hot View Post
 


I tend to doubt that the example you give is better -- assuming your definition of better is 'more secure'. The first can be hacked with a dictionary attack whereas the second is totally random an uses a mix of lowercase alpha, numbers and punctuation. By simple reasoning alone your 14 char passwords are made up of a common simple phrase consisting of 3 words (one being the most common password used) whereas the other could be stronger and contain as many english language pairs I would consider it stronger. Care to share your source?

I thought it odd, too, DIH....

 

Source: Arizona Republic

 

Ken Colburn Founder and CEO of DataDoctors:

 

http://www.azcentral.com/story/money/business/2014/08/06/steps-protect-russian-hackers-breach/13690497/

 

Best,

post #10 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post
 

I don’t remember why I’d need this over what OS X/iOS does natively. Anyone?


Apple's keychain offers only a subset of the functionality you get in 1Password.

 

For starters, Keychain is less secure in that anyone who gets access to your computer can access your passwords. 1Password can lock itself after a predetermined time, and require re-entry of the master password, which can be separate from your Mac or iOS login/passcode. 1Password is  both a standalone app and a web plug-in (and not limited to just Safari), and it has a much richer interface for managing your passwords and personal info.

 

It also has advanced security features, such as highlighting websites that have been recently compromised by security exploits so you can change your password. It gives you many configuration options when suggesting passwords, and can show you existing weak or duplicate passwords.

 

In web browsers, 1Password can log you into websites even when the websites are set to disallow saving of passwords, which is a common annoyance with banks, for example. For credit cards it can not only remember your account number but also your expiration date and CVV code, as well as additional customizable fields.

 

With Yosemite and iOS 8, 1Password will take advantage of Extensions so that it can even enter passwords in apps, instead of just on web pages, and prompt you for a fingerprint scan instead of requiring the master password.


Edited by freediverx - 8/7/14 at 5:10pm
post #11 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by Damn_Its_Hot View Post
 

I tend to doubt that the example you give is better -- assuming your definition of better is 'more secure'. The first can be hacked with a dictionary attack whereas the second is totally random an uses a mix of lowercase alpha, numbers and punctuation. By simple reasoning alone your 14 char passwords are made up of a common simple phrase consisting of 3 words (one being the most common password used) whereas the other could be stronger and contain as many english language pairs I would consider it stronger. Care to share your source?

 

 

 

http://www.explainxkcd.com/wiki/index.php/936:_Password_Strength

 

 

Tl/DR: A long password comprised of simple words is more secure and easier to remember than a shorter alphanumeric password with symbols and punctuation.


Edited by freediverx - 8/7/14 at 5:15pm
post #12 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by christopher126 View Post
 

I have 1Password for my iMac, iPhone and iPad. I just read in the paper today, that a password such as "Ihatepasswords" is  better than "#wsyfgr59sgoa."

 

Oh well.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Damn_Its_Hot View Post
 


I tend to doubt that the example you give is better -- assuming your definition of better is 'more secure'. The first can be hacked with a dictionary attack whereas the second is totally random an uses a mix of lowercase alpha, numbers and punctuation. By simple reasoning alone your 14 char passwords are made up of a common simple phrase consisting of 3 words (one being the most common password used) whereas the other could be stronger and contain as many english language pairs I would consider it stronger. Care to share your source?

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by christopher126 View Post
 

I thought it odd, too, DIH....

 

Source: Arizona Republic

 

Ken Colburn Founder and CEO of DataDoctors:

 

http://www.azcentral.com/story/money/business/2014/08/06/steps-protect-russian-hackers-breach/13690497/

 

Best,

 

I just read what he said and although the concept is correct, the way he said it is wrong.  A passphrase with at least 8 parts is more secure than a totally random password that you have to write down to remember (It is the writing down part that makes it insecure).   Just like P@ssw0rd is a bad choice because it is so common, IHatePasswords! is also bad for being so common (Not to mention short).  Having said that however, using a password vault like 1Password and a fully randomized password is the most secure, as your password is not available in "plain text" but you have the full randomness of a crazy password like #wsyfgr59sgoa.  Also you have the added benefit of a different password for each site, so if one password is compromised, not all of your passwords are compromised.  Just make sure that your Master password is a high security but easy for you to remember password/passphrase.

 

Edit: I just saw FreeDiverX's post and his cartoon demonstrates the concept of passphrases perfectly.    I still like the longer 8 part passphrases, but if the words are random, he is correct that 4 should be enough.

post #13 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post
 

I don’t remember why I’d need this over what OS X/iOS does natively. Anyone?

 

I don't see the point either. Maybe people are unaware of the iCloud keychain? 

Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

Reply

Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

Reply
post #14 of 97
1Password is amazing. iCloud Keychain is alright but as others have said its a subset of 1Password. I work with it everyday. It is indispensable to me.
post #15 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post
 

I don’t remember why I’d need this over what OS X/iOS does natively. Anyone?

 

This.  Why use this over Keychain?  I'm curious if anybody has user feedback.

post #16 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jetz View Post
 

 

This.  Why use this over Keychain?  I'm curious if anybody has user feedback.


Perhaps you should read some of the comments...

post #17 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by christopher126 View Post
 

 I just read in the paper today...

 

 

Well it must be true then.

post #18 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jetz View Post
 

 

This.  Why use this over Keychain?  I'm curious if anybody has user feedback.

 

1. You're not always on a Mac or iOS device

2. You're not stuck to using Safari

3. Not all websites support iCloud Keychain in fact when I tried it, barely any did. 

4. iCloud keychain doesn't seem to support complex forms such as banking login's while 1Password does

5. There are better complexity choices for 1Password

6. Passwords for 1Password are not stored in the cloud so if iCloud goes down, so does your ability to login. I tend to believe its more secure to not have your passwords stored elsewhere. Yes, my 1Password database is stored in iCloud, but only for syncing purposes and its an encrypted proprietary file. 

 

Simply put, iCloud Keychain isn't really that great vs using something like 1Password. Its much more versatile. 


Edited by macxpress - 8/7/14 at 6:21pm

Mac Mini (Mid 2011) 2.5 GHz Core i5

120 GB SSD/500 GB HD/8 GB RAM

AMD Radeon HD 6630M 256 MB

Reply

Mac Mini (Mid 2011) 2.5 GHz Core i5

120 GB SSD/500 GB HD/8 GB RAM

AMD Radeon HD 6630M 256 MB

Reply
post #19 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post
 

I don't see the point either. Maybe people are unaware of the iCloud keychain? 

See freediverx's first reply (post #10).

 

He touches on all the major valid points and correctly identifies the numerous instances where iCloud keychain comes up short.

 

Moreover, 1Password has built-in templates for a wider variety of data types, like driver licenses, reward programs, memberships, social security numbers, passports, software licenses, wifi routers, bank accounts (including routing number, Swift, IBAN, etc.) and allows for customizable fields as well (e.g., multiple security questions/answers for banks).

 

I occasionally book travel for family members, so having their details (passport, drivers license, frequent flyer memberships, etc.) is useful, as are social security numbers for designating beneficiaries.

 

The app's default security is tighter than iCloud keychain by default. If someone busts into your iDevice (or if you loan it to someone), they still need to enter a password to access 1Password, by default a longer alphanumeric password (not a 4-digit PIN).

 

Most of these shortcomings were pointed out when iCloud keychain debuted (iOS 7.0.3 on October 22, 2013) which is why 1Password has been a very successful app, even after iCloud keychain became available to the general public. iCloud keychain itself was discussed at the WWDC 2013, so it has been well over a year when its limitations were revealed.

 

Personally, I would be happy to ditch the spendy 1Password app for something native to the iOS operating system, but it needs to have a reasonably similar level of usefulness, flexibility, and security, none of which are present in the current version of iCloud keychain.

 

And hey, I haven't given up my Yahoo Mail IMAP account, Flickr account or Dropbox account either!

 

:D 


Edited by mpantone - 8/7/14 at 7:57pm
post #20 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by macxpress View Post
 

 

1. You're not always on a Mac or iOS device

2. You're not stuck to using Safari

3. Not all websites support iCloud Keychain in fact when I tried it, barely any did. 

4. iCloud keychain doesn't seem to support complex forms such as banking login's while 1Password does

5. There are better complexity choices for 1Password

6. Passwords for 1Password are not stored in the cloud so if iCloud goes down, so does your ability to login. I tend to believe its more secure to not have your passwords stored elsewhere. Yes, my 1Password database is stored in iCloud, but only for syncing purposes and its an encrypted proprietary file. 

 

Simply put, iCloud Keychain isn't really that great vs using something like 1Password. Its much more versatile. 

 

It sounds like a lot of dubiously useful fluff to store a list of passwords.  I'm guessing more and more are using iCloud keychain: hence the sale.

 

I only use iCloud keychain for a few less critical entities. For the important stuff, a password protected Numbers document on iCloud containing a list of needed log/passes is a lot more desirable than introducing another third party, 1Password, into the mix.  I have no reason to suspect they aren't secure, but its just one more point of failure.

 

Then again, I'm the kinda guy who uses the built-in tools on max, and only go 3rd party for extras when absolutely needed.  This leaves a lot of third party stuff at the door, including everything Google makes (which includes the bloatware Chrome).  All this gives me a total +5 security power advantage over other nerds in this specific dork quest. :smokey: 

post #21 of 97

Sounds like a paid endorsement/ad. Not news or rumor. Apps are updated all the time. Big whoop-dee-doo.

post #22 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by redefiler View Post
 

 

It sounds like a lot of dubiously useful fluff to store a list of passwords.  I'm guessing more and more are using iCloud keychain: hence the sale.

 

I only use iCloud keychain for a few less critical entities. For the important stuff, a password protected Numbers document on iCloud containing a list of needed log/passes is a lot more desirable than introducing another third party, 1Password, into the mix.  I have no reason to suspect they aren't secure, but its just one more point of failure.

 

Then again, I'm the kinda guy who uses the built-in tools on max, and only go 3rd party for extras when absolutely needed.  This leaves a lot of third party stuff at the door, including everything Google makes (which includes the bloatware Chrome).  All this gives me a total +5 security power advantage over other nerds in this specific dork quest. :smokey: 

 

This has got to be the most unintuitive and asinine way to store and retrieve passwords I've ever heard of. Not only is it more of a pain in the ass to store and retrieve a password, it doesn't autofill it, it doesn't create complex passwords, and also requires Numbers be installed on whatever you're using. 

 

But if it works for you I guess that all that matters. 

 

Its an extremely popular app and is only on-sale because of the recent release of the amount of passwords stolen over the year to get people to use a real password manager that can create real passwords and if it is stolen from a site, its not a password you use everywhere else (a very common mistake by TONS of users around the world) and its very easily changed by just making 1Password recreates a complex password. 

 

I honestly don't know of a single person that uses iCloud Keychain because of lack of actual usefulness for the reasons I've explained in the original post. 

Mac Mini (Mid 2011) 2.5 GHz Core i5

120 GB SSD/500 GB HD/8 GB RAM

AMD Radeon HD 6630M 256 MB

Reply

Mac Mini (Mid 2011) 2.5 GHz Core i5

120 GB SSD/500 GB HD/8 GB RAM

AMD Radeon HD 6630M 256 MB

Reply
post #23 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jetz View Post

This.  Why use this over Keychain?  I'm curious if anybody has user feedback.
It can hold credit card details, driver licence details (with image), kids Medicare cards, software licences etc. Touch ID will make this awesome app even more awesome.
post #24 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by macxpress View Post
 

 

This has got to be the most unintuitive and asinine way to retrieve passwords I've ever heard of. Not only is it more of a pain in the ass to retrieve a password, it doesn't autofill it, it also requires Numbers be installed on whatever you're using. 

 

But if it works for you I guess that all that matters. 

 

Its an extremely popular app and is only on-sale because of the recent release of the amount of passwords stolen over the year to get people to use a real password manager that can create real passwords and if it is stolen from a site, its not a password you use everywhere else (a very common mistake by TONS of users around the world) and its very easily changed by just making 1Password recreates a complex password. 

 

It requires Numbers to be installed?

iCloud.com - learn it, love it.

 

Auto-fill is insecure, I only use for trivial stuff like Appleinsider.com.  I don't use it for banking, any financial transactions, communication accounts, etc.  A little more hassle, yes.  But so is engaging the second dead-bolt lock on my front door.

 

Popular is iCloud Keychain.  1Password is having a sale before the iOS8 launch.  If the recent stolen password thing is anything other than hype, it's yet another fine reason not to add another entity like 1Password, and point of failure into the ways your junk can get jacked.

post #25 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by redefiler View Post
 

But so is engaging the second dead-bolt lock on my front door.

Wow, you must live in a really shitty neighborhood.

post #26 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by redefiler View Post
 

I only use iCloud keychain for a few less critical entities. For the important stuff, a password protected Numbers document on iCloud containing a list of needed log/passes is a lot more desirable than introducing another third party, 1Password, into the mix.  I have no reason to suspect they aren't secure, but its just one more point of failure.

 

Then again, I'm the kinda guy who uses the built-in tools on max, and only go 3rd party for extras when absolutely needed.  This leaves a lot of third party stuff at the door, including everything Google makes (which includes the bloatware Chrome).  All this gives me a total +5 security power advantage over other nerds in this specific dork quest. :smokey: 

 

 

1Password and The Crypto Wars

 

http://blog.agilebits.com/2013/09/06/1password-and-the-crypto-wars/

 

https://discussions.agilebits.com/discussion/comment/82109

post #27 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by paxman View Post


It can hold credit card details, driver licence details (with image), kids Medicare cards, software licences etc. Touch ID will make this awesome app even more awesome.

 

Pages and Numbers with iCloud does all of this too.

post #28 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by redefiler View Post
 

 

Pages and Numbers with iCloud does all of this too.


Not even remotely at the same level.

post #29 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by redefiler View Post
 

 

Pages and Numbers with iCloud does all of this too.

 

Its also insecure and as soon as iCloud goes down so does the ability to access all of your data. Which is why your solution isn't as great as it sounds. 

 

Quote:
 Auto-fill is insecure

 

Not if you're the one prompting the autofill. It doesn't just do it automatically.  I think you need to learn and understand how to use the program itself before knocking its features and capabilities. 

 

Storing your passwords in an unencrypted file in the cloud is extremely insecure. Password or not, its not secure as you think it is. 

Mac Mini (Mid 2011) 2.5 GHz Core i5

120 GB SSD/500 GB HD/8 GB RAM

AMD Radeon HD 6630M 256 MB

Reply

Mac Mini (Mid 2011) 2.5 GHz Core i5

120 GB SSD/500 GB HD/8 GB RAM

AMD Radeon HD 6630M 256 MB

Reply
post #30 of 97
Quote:

 

Yes, they are eager to point out that according to their press materials, their 3rd party password app is totally secure-a-riffic.  Thanks for the ad. :smokey:

post #31 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by macxpress View Post
 

 

Its also insecure and as soon as iCloud goes down so does the ability to access all of your data. Which is why your solution isn't as great as it sounds. 

 

 

Not if you're the one prompting the autofill. It doesn't just do it automatically.  I think you need to learn and understand how to use the program itself before knocking its features and capabilities. 

 

Storing your passwords in an unencrypted file in the cloud is extremely insecure. Password or not, its not secure as you think it is. 

 

iCloud is encrypted. http://support.apple.com/kb/HT4865

 

We get it.  You prefer to use third party tools plus a few non-essential features, instead of utilizing the built-in tools to do practically the same thing.  That's fantastic. :rolleyes:

post #32 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by macxpress View Post
 

 

Its also insecure and as soon as iCloud goes down so does the ability to access all of your data. Which is why your solution isn't as great as it sounds. 

Forgot to address this, but here you go:

 

Yes, the time when iCloud is most likely to 'go down' for me, is when I don't have an internet connection.  At that very instant you will be 100% correct and I will be completely, permanently heartbroken when I'm not able to login onto internet things.  Genius.

post #33 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by redefiler View Post
 

 

iCloud is encrypted. http://support.apple.com/kb/HT4865

 

We get it.  You prefer to use third party tools plus a few non-essential features, instead of utilizing the built-in tools to do practically the same thing.  That's fantastic. :rolleyes:

 

No it doesn't.

post #34 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by NasserAE View Post
 

 

No it doesn't.

 

Oh really I didn't realize, so obvious now.

post #35 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by redefiler View Post
 

 

Oh really I didn't realize, so obvious now.

 

Would you like to buy my 1PDF reader, 1Email Reader, 1Picture File Transfer and 1Text Editor apps too?

http://bit.ly/1spsrUD

 

To say that these two (screenshots below) do the same is ridiculous. Many tried to explain to you that 1Password is not only password keeping utility. You can download the 30 days fully functional trial from their website and see for yourself. They are not trying to trick people into buying it.

 

    

post #36 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by NasserAE View Post
 

 

To say that these two (screenshots below) do the same is ridiculous. Many tried to explain to you that 1Password is not only password keeping utility. You can download the 30 days fully functional trial from their website and see for yourself. They are not trying to trick people into buying it.

 

I never said they were trying to trick people, that's your imagination playing tricks on you.

I said it was redundant and needless (I even specified for my particular needs).

 

You realize passwords are just text right?  You don't need a special cutesy password app to store/sort text.

With a Numbers spreadsheet you can even type whatever you want into the left hand column. :smokey:

post #37 of 97

Can anyone here help me compare 1Password to Dashlane which charges $30 for a year of similar functionality. Not sure which one is actually better. 

 

Anyone..? 

 

THX

 

Phil

post #38 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by redefiler View Post

I never said they were trying to trick people, that's your imagination playing tricks on you.
I said it was redundant and needless (I even specified for my particular needs).

You realize passwords are just text right?  You don't need a special cutesy password app to store/sort text.

With a Numbers spreadsheet you can even type whatever you want into the left hand column. 1smoking.gif

Why bother with Numbers?! Go to a stationary store and buy one of these notebooks with small lock and key and built in pencil. It will do exactly the same thing and you don't have to worry about syncing and internet!
post #39 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by redefiler View Post
 

I only use iCloud keychain for a few less critical entities. For the important stuff, a password protected Numbers document on iCloud containing a list of needed log/passes is a lot more desirable than introducing another third party, 1Password, into the mix.  I have no reason to suspect they aren't secure, but its just one more point of failure.

 

Then again, I'm the kinda guy who uses the built-in tools on max, and only go 3rd party for extras when absolutely needed.  This leaves a lot of third party stuff at the door, including everything Google makes (which includes the bloatware Chrome).  All this gives me a total +5 security power advantage over other nerds in this specific dork quest. :smokey: 

 

You're right - you don't need to pay for a password tool. You can store your passwords in a spreadsheet. You know what else? You don't need to use a car to get to work - that costs money and is, in a sense, a third-party tool when compared to your feet which you could use to walk to work. I bought a car because I wanted the convenience and the speed of getting where I want to go.

 

I'm afraid I have to completely agree with macxpress - this sounds like the most cumbersome, inconvenient method of password management I can imagine. If you only log in to a couple of sites, and if you're the kind of person who isn't willing to pay a little money for convenience, then more power to you for using what works.

 

On the other hand, I currently have 317 distinct website passwords stored in 1Password and I can't even begin to fathom the hassle of wanting to log in to a site, switching to Numbers and opening a document, searching for the site, copying the login name, switching back to Safari, pasting the login name, switching back to Numbers, copying the password, switching back to Safari, and pasting the password. And if there's a secondary or tertiary authentication method (as is often the case with banks), repeating the process a third, and possibly a fourth time.

 

And then if I want to purchase something on a site, opening another Numbers spreadsheet or tab and repeating the process for my credit card number, my expiration date, and my verification code. No. Just. No.

 

Instead of all this, I open 1Password on my Mac or iOS device, type in the name of the site I want to hit, select it, click the link, and within seconds I'm logged in and doing whatever it is I needed to do. If I want to buy something, from within 1Password I hit the lock icon and navigate to my desired method of payment and select it and all of the information is entered and I'm done. Ditto for my shipping and billing address information.

 

Seriously, whatever works for you - but before I'd resort to storing my passwords in a spreadsheet and dealing with lots of app switching and copying and pasting, I'd bang my head against a wall. Of nails. With the pointy-sides out. After they've been left to rust. That sounds far more pleasant.

post #40 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by NasserAE View Post

No it doesn't.

I'm amazed at hoe many people forego the simplest tasks because they never thought it would happen to them. Fortune favours the prepared.

This bot has been removed from circulation due to a malfunctioning morality chip.

Reply

This bot has been removed from circulation due to a malfunctioning morality chip.

Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: iPhone
  • 1Password for iOS/Mac gets temporary price cut, upcoming iOS 8 version to be free update [u]
AppleInsider › Forums › Mobile › iPhone › 1Password for iOS/Mac gets temporary price cut, upcoming iOS 8 version to be free update [u]