or Connect
AppleInsider › Forums › Mobile › iPhone › HP courted Apple, now in talks with Google for 'Enterprise Siri' to boost corporate sales
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

HP courted Apple, now in talks with Google for 'Enterprise Siri' to boost corporate sales

post #1 of 22
Thread Starter 
As it looks to rebound after years of slumping performance, old-guard Silicon Valley firm Hewlett-Packard reportedly held talks with relative newcomers Apple and Google in recent months to create a new type of "Enterprise Siri" system that would allow its corporate customers to search their document and data troves using their voice.




While talks with Google continue to plod along, Apple is said to have broken off discussions --?which were to include a "broader partnership" -- following the consummation of its landmark enterprise agreement with HP archrival IBM. Word of the negotiations was reported by Amir Efrati and Jessica Lessin of The Information.

Google is looking to expand the reach of Google Now, its own voice-activated search system. The company has faced unsure footing as it pitches enterprise clients thanks to Google Now's lack of integration with third-party systems, something HP might be able to help with.

HP, meanwhile, has also sought Google's help in building enterprise-friendly mobile phones based on Android. The Palo Alto, Calif.-based company is said to have pitched an enterprise-focused "Nexus" handset and new, military-specification encryption hardware but was rebuffed by former Android boss Andy Rubin.

With no agreement in place with either Apple or Google, HP is believed to have turned to longtime partner Microsoft for help in building its new voice search product. The companies will likely look to integrate voice recognition technology from Nuance, which also powers Siri, and data warehousing and management solutions from HP units Vertica and Autonomy.

HP and Apple share a long history together. Late Apple CEO Steve Jobs was given a summer internship as a teenager by legendary HP cofounder Bill Hewlett, and Apple's new "spaceship" headquarters will sit on land that previously served as HP's corporate campus.
post #2 of 22

I remember when HP was considered one of the very best places to work in Silicon Valley.  Their managers practiced "management by walking around," they had great benefits, they had one of the first campus-like headquarters, and all that.

 

But no, I never heard of any super-good HP products.  Aside from their RPN calculators and scientific / medical equipment.  Their software just never made much of an impression, and apparently that's still true.

Sent from my iPhone Simulator

Reply

Sent from my iPhone Simulator

Reply
post #3 of 22
From last month, an article on HP and MS expanding their working partnership to business mobility solutions.
http://www.crn.com/news/mobility/300073401/hp-launches-new-unit-teams-with-microsoft-intel-on-business-mobility.htm
melior diabolus quem scies
Reply
melior diabolus quem scies
Reply
post #4 of 22

Someone at HP wants to give the search giant, Google, access to all HP enterprise level documents? What well thought out plan!

"Building for the future?! They should be running around reacting to the present!" -John Moltz
Reply
"Building for the future?! They should be running around reacting to the present!" -John Moltz
Reply
post #5 of 22
HP had first rights to sell the Apple I because Woz was a HP employee at the time he made it. They passed on it. The rest is history.

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
Reply

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
Reply
post #6 of 22

Have any here actually tried to solve a problem using their web site? It's a real shame.

Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

Reply

Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

Reply
post #7 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post
 

Have any here actually tried to solve a problem using their web site? It's a real shame.

Not even trying to solve a problem, but just find information. It's horrid.

post #8 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by SockRolid View Post
 

I remember when HP was considered one of the very best places to work in Silicon Valley.  Their managers practiced "management by walking around," they had great benefits, they had one of the first campus-like headquarters, and all that.

 

But no, I never heard of any super-good HP products.  Aside from their RPN calculators and scientific / medical equipment.  Their software just never made much of an impression, and apparently that's still true.

 

I think there is something that happens to a company when it decides to court enterprises. They get very entrenched making these monolithic, convoluted solutions to what are essentially very boring, though necessary, problems. You have to maintain insane levels of backwards compatibility to what may have been bad ideas at the time (or at least proven to be later) and any drastic changes to architecture, support or even simple features risk alienating you customers and losing revenue. So basically you stick with what works and don't venture too far from that formula. 

 

When you are a company like HP it's very hard to set aside the R&D to do something different because you don't have anyone that thinks like that in the company, your current customers aren't asking for it and breaking into new markets is a moonshot that nobody on the board wants to risk. HP had an great opportunity with Palm, but got motion sickness on the first go-round and couldn't stomach the risk so they bailed.

 

When a company does that over and over again they have a hard time attracting talent, customers become weary of adopting first versions of new tech and the cycle repeats. If a guy has a choice between making 120K a year fidgeting with enterprise databases or 120K a year doing something cool and innovative, he's going to go where he's comfortable and until HP (and others like them) change their image they will just be nuts and bots, interchangeable, enterprise hardware and software guys.

post #9 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by SockRolid View Post

I remember when HP was considered one of the very best places to work in Silicon Valley.  Their managers practiced "management by walking around," they had great benefits, they had one of the first campus-like headquarters, and all that.

But no, I never heard of any super-good HP products.  Aside from their RPN calculators and scientific / medical equipment.  Their software just never made much of an impression, and apparently that's still true.

I have a HP copy/fax/printer/scanner which is surprisingly remarkable.

For purely sentimental reasons I miss The Shark Tank (aka "San Jose Arena") being known as HP Pavilion (the name for which San Jose Arena was known for nearly a decade).


Quote:
Originally Posted by Eric Swinson View Post

I think there is something that happens to a company when it decides to court enterprises. They get very entrenched making these monolithic, convoluted solutions to what are essentially very boring, though necessary, problems. You have to maintain insane levels of backwards compatibility to what may have been bad ideas at the time (or at least proven to be later) and any drastic changes to architecture, support or even simple features risk alienating you customers and losing revenue. So basically you stick with what works and don't venture too far from that formula. 

When you are a company like HP it's very hard to set aside the R&D to do something different because you don't have anyone that thinks like that in the company, your current customers aren't asking for it and breaking into new markets is a moonshot that nobody on the board wants to risk. HP had an great opportunity with Palm, but got motion sickness on the first go-round and couldn't stomach the risk so they bailed.

When a company does that over and over again they have a hard time attracting talent, customers become weary of adopting first versions of new tech and the cycle repeats. If a guy has a choice between making 120K a year fidgeting with enterprise databases or 120K a year doing something cool and innovative, he's going to go where he's comfortable and until HP (and others like them) change their image they will just be nuts and bots, interchangeable, enterprise hardware and software guys.


HP had some exciting spinoffs in the medical field but those products have since (apparently) been ruined by the new owners.


Few people were as excited as I when HP had the vision to purchase Palm and began to tout WebOS as a distinct advantage they would leverage. Alas ...
post #10 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

From last month, an article on HP and MS expanding their working partnership to business mobility solutions.
http://www.crn.com/news/mobility/300073401/hp-launches-new-unit-teams-with-microsoft-intel-on-business-mobility.htm

It's a lot easier to "talk a good story," i.e., "consulting," than it is to design and build great category leading products. That's what IBM and now HP are doing. Consultants are brought in when executive management can't cut it... IMHO

post #11 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Eric Swinson View Post
 

 

I think there is something that happens to a company when it decides to court enterprises. They get very entrenched making these monolithic, convoluted solutions to what are essentially very boring, though necessary, problems. You have to maintain insane levels of backwards compatibility to what may have been bad ideas at the time (or at least proven to be later) and any drastic changes to architecture, support or even simple features risk alienating you customers and losing revenue. So basically you stick with what works and don't venture too far from that formula. 

 

When you are a company like HP it's very hard to set aside the R&D to do something different because you don't have anyone that thinks like that in the company, your current customers aren't asking for it and breaking into new markets is a moonshot that nobody on the board wants to risk. HP had an great opportunity with Palm, but got motion sickness on the first go-round and couldn't stomach the risk so they bailed.

 

When a company does that over and over again they have a hard time attracting talent, customers become weary of adopting first versions of new tech and the cycle repeats. If a guy has a choice between making 120K a year fidgeting with enterprise databases or 120K a year doing something cool and innovative, he's going to go where he's comfortable and until HP (and others like them) change their image they will just be nuts and bots, interchangeable, enterprise hardware and software guys.

Seems to me like you just listed both ends of the extremes:  Companies that "maintain insane levels of backwards compatibility" and companies that end support for things at the drop of a hat.

post #12 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacBook Pro View Post

For purely sentimental reasons I miss The Shark Tank (aka "San Jose Arena") being known as HP Pavilion

 

The most clever name for an arena EVER.

 

Okay, the ONLY clever name for an arena, ever.

Lorin Schultz (formerly V5V)

Audio Engineer

V5V Digital Media, Vancouver, BC Canada

Reply

Lorin Schultz (formerly V5V)

Audio Engineer

V5V Digital Media, Vancouver, BC Canada

Reply
post #13 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

With no agreement in place with either Apple or Google, HP is believed to have turned to longtime partner Microsoft for help in building its new voice search product. The companies will likely look to integrate voice recognition technology from Nuance, which also powers Siri, and data warehousing and management solutions from HP units Vertica and Autonomy.

 

I find it highly unlikely that MS would look to Nuance for voice recognition - since they have their own solution.

post #14 of 22
Sorry HP, IBM is a better fit. They have Watson and no Windows PCs.
post #15 of 22
Their Scientific Spin-Off, Agilent Technologies is still top dog.

http://www.agilent.com/cs/ContentServer?c=Page&pagename=Sapphire/Page/HomePage
post #16 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleSauce007 View Post

Sorry HP, IBM is a better fit. They have Watson and no Windows PCs.

IBM is the better coupling in this partnership, hands down.
post #17 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post

Have any here actually tried to solve a problem using their web site? It's a real shame.

The whole site needs an overhaul, doesn't it? Maybe they should say goodbye to Huddler.
"If the young are not initiated into the village, they will burn it down just to feel its warmth."
- African proverb
Reply
"If the young are not initiated into the village, they will burn it down just to feel its warmth."
- African proverb
Reply
post #18 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

While talks with Google continue to plod along, Apple is said to have broken off discussions -- which were to include a "broader partnership" -- following the consummation of its landmark enterprise agreement with HP archrival IBM.

 

Apple + IBM to HP: "Cool idea! We'll include it as one of the many useful features in our pending joint venture.  Now scoot along!"

You did not come into the world to fail. You came into the world to succeed.

- Gordon Hinckley

Reply

You did not come into the world to fail. You came into the world to succeed.

- Gordon Hinckley

Reply
post #19 of 22
Samsung products are junk, especially the power supplies. Apple has shown some wisdom not to have anything to do with a company that sells junk.
post #20 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by aussiepaul View Post

Samsung products are junk, especially the power supplies. Apple has shown some wisdom not to have anything to do with a company that sells junk.
You need to see how much Apple sources from Samsung. that's a lot of junk they seem to putting into their products then
post #21 of 22
Originally Posted by singularity View Post
You need to see how much Apple sources from Samsung. that's a lot of junk they seem to putting into their products then

 

So are you really confused about this or are you purposely being obtuse?

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already f*ed.

 

Reply

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already f*ed.

 

Reply
post #22 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post
 
Originally Posted by singularity View Post
You need to see how much Apple sources from Samsung. that's a lot of junk they seem to putting into their products then

 

So are you really confused about this or are you purposely being obtuse?

 

The latter, of course. I can answer on his behalf.

"If the young are not initiated into the village, they will burn it down just to feel its warmth."
- African proverb
Reply
"If the young are not initiated into the village, they will burn it down just to feel its warmth."
- African proverb
Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: iPhone
  • HP courted Apple, now in talks with Google for 'Enterprise Siri' to boost corporate sales
AppleInsider › Forums › Mobile › iPhone › HP courted Apple, now in talks with Google for 'Enterprise Siri' to boost corporate sales