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Apple's iOS, Google's Android grow to 96.4% of smartphone market as competitors shrink, IDC says

post #1 of 75
Thread Starter 
The two-horse race for smartphone operating system share continues to obliterate competitors, as Apple's iOS and Google's Android were the only two platforms to see growth in the second quarter of 2014, the latest data from IDC claims.




Apple's iPhone shipments grew 12.7 percent to 35.2 million total units in the June quarter. According to IDC, that growth was slower than the wide range of devices from various manufacturers running Android, which increased by 33.3 percent to an estimated 255.3 million units.

As a result, though Apple saw growth for the period, its overall market share slipped from 13 percent of shipments in the same period in 2013 to 11.7 percent in the June 2014 quarter. Android, meanwhile, represented 84.7 percent of devices shipped in the quarter, according to IDC, up from 79.6 percent a year ago.

IDC also broke down market share by price tier, where Apple unsurprisingly dominates in the high-end range of handsets over $400. Almost all of the iPhones Apple shipped were priced over $400, while nearly 60 percent of Android handsets shipped were priced under $200.

It should be noted that IDC's methodologies have been called into question in recent months, as the firm's predictions often differ significantly from reported numbers.




With iOS and Android growing their shipments, competitors took heavy losses. Microsoft's Windows Phone, which has been struggling to gain a foothold in the market, fell an estimated 9.4 percent to just 7.4 million total units shipped worldwide. Among phones shipped, an even greater percentage were priced under $200 than with Android.

Microsoft's estimated market share was pegged at 2.5 percent for the quarter, compared to 3.4 percent of shipments in the same period a year ago.

The losses were even worse for BlackBerry, where shipments are estimated to have dropped 78 percent year over year to 1.5 million units. IDC believes BlackBerry had a 0.5 percent share of shipments in the June quarter, off from 2.8 percent in the same period in 2013.

Other mobile operating systems also saw losses, down 32.2 percent to 1.9 million collective units shipped.

But the overall market was up, thanks to the growth seen by Apple's iOS and Google's Android. Total shipments increased by 25.3 percent year over year, reaching 301.3 million units in the June quarter. In comparison, 240.5 million smartphones were shipped in the same period of 2013.
post #2 of 75
Does anyone really believe IDC number at all?
post #3 of 75
IDC say it, so it must be true...
post #4 of 75
I honestly cant take ANYTHING IDC says seriously. This report means nothing.
post #5 of 75
It is far past time for analysts to differentiate the Google Play platform from the bastardized versions of Android AOSP running on most phones in Asia and even on Amazon's devices.
"Android" alone has zero relevance to understanding the market for apps, services and even hardware.

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post #6 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by JONOROM View Post

It is far past time for analysts to differentiate the Google Play platform from the bastardized versions of Android AOSP running on most phones in Asia and even on Amazon's devices.
"Android" alone has zero relevance to understanding the market for apps, services and even hardware.

 

Well in this context they're speaking of the operating system, not platform, so it is valid. However, I would never trust their statistics.

Disclaimer: The things I say are merely my own personal opinion and may or may not be based on facts. At certain points in any discussion, sarcasm may ensue.
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post #7 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by Interdyne View Post

Does anyone really believe IDC number at all?

 

Aren't they occasionally cited by Apple brass?

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post #8 of 75
My point is that the "Android operating system", undifferentiated by version, mods, ability to be updated etc. is a completely irrelevant number to anything in the known universe.

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post #9 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by JONOROM View Post

My point is that the "Android operating system", undifferentiated by version, mods, ability to be updated etc. is a completely irrelevant number to anything in the known universe.

A breakdown by Google Play Services version would probably be the most helpful. A version graph wouldn't show which ones have an update on the way, and it wouldn't do a good job of distinguishing Android-without-Google devices like Amazon's.

post #10 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by JONOROM View Post

My point is that the "Android operating system", undifferentiated by version, mods, ability to be updated etc. is a completely irrelevant number to anything in the known universe.

The point isn't what it is, but what it's not, and regardless of what flavor of Android it is, it is not Windows, BB, etc,.....
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post #11 of 75

I'm wondering what new iPhone model was priced ar $200 to $400 ?

Also those cheapie android less that $200  phones are certainly primitive.

 

What would be interesting would be a comparison of the iPhone iOS7 competitive  phones,

  which would improve the BB and Win figures significantly.

Lumping the bottom end old model android cheapie phones in with iOS7 level phones makes this survey useless !

post #12 of 75

A bit surprised that the Windows Mobile graph shows more of a tendency toward cheaper devices than Android.  I haven't seen many Windows Phone devices in the wild but they've all been high end Lumias.

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post #13 of 75
Who gives a rat's behind about this IDC report.
post #14 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by PScooter63 View Post

Aren't they occasionally cited by Apple brass?

Yes because there isn't any other data. No one but Apple reports numbers.

Still, I wouldn't trust IDC for anything.
post #15 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by Interdyne View Post

Does anyone really believe IDC number at all?

They aren't worth the paper they are printed on. Metaphorically speaking.

post #16 of 75

How would you feel if your product was number on the market place and you did not make any money, I am not say you profits were less than your costs, but you actually may no money, no income so it is a complete lost. Google gave away the product so they did not have any return on money invested.

 

They also fail to materialize any real mobile ad revenue, they still make the majority of their money on IOS. All Google did was to help other make money. It is just going to get worse for them.

 

The reason IDC now breaks down the phones into market segment is to show that Apple is failing to attract customer on the low end. I best they will say the largest share of customers in the world are on the low end and Apple is missing out. It design to tell the story they want which is Apple is failing.

post #17 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crowley View Post

A bit surprised that the Windows Mobile graph shows more of a tendency toward cheaper devices than Android.  I haven't seen many Windows Phone devices in the wild but they've all been high end Lumias.

I think the best-selling Windows Phone in the world is the Lumia 520.

It's about $100 unlocked.

And from what I hear.... it's a pretty nice phone for the price... MUCH better than the usual $100 Android phone.

There's a cheap Motorola Android phone that's pretty good... but it doesn't sell nearly the same volume as other Android phones.

The general consensus is... if you've only got $100 to spend... the Lumia 520 is the phone to get.
post #18 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crowley View Post
 

A bit surprised that the Windows Mobile graph shows more of a tendency toward cheaper devices than Android.  I haven't seen many Windows Phone devices in the wild but they've all been high end Lumias.

 

Two of my colleagues (both make well above 6 figure for the reference) bought  Lumia 520 for about $100 unlocked.

Maybe camera is shitty but UI is smooth as silk from what I've seen.

 

So I am with my $700 iPhone starting wondering how Apple can even compete with these phones...

post #19 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maestro64 View Post

The reason IDC now breaks down the phones into market segment is to show that Apple is failing to attract customer on the low end. I best they will say the largest share of customers in the world are on the low end and Apple is missing out. It design to tell the story they want which is Apple is failing.

Whatever the reason is... I'm glad they did.

The automobile market is broken down into different segments... why not smartphones?

It's silly to compare sales of luxury sedans to sales of sub-compact hatchbacks. And that's why they don't do it.
post #20 of 75
To take a quote from jobs biography, true smartphone manufacturers sell they don't just ship! What would be interesting would be to look at sales to consumers and the amount of phones stuck in the shipping chain. Maybe a ratio would be better I.e. Sales/shipped!
post #21 of 75
But Android and iOS will switch #1 and #2 positions with each other if we count units actually sold and shipped, not just stocked. (:-)
post #22 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post


IDC also broke down market share by price tier, where Apple unsurprisingly dominates in the high-end range of handsets over $400.

This is flat out wrong based on the numbers from this article itself. Even though only 20% of Android devices were high-end, that still is more than the entire number of iPhones Apple sold. Thus Android dominates the high-end market worldwide.
post #23 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crowley View Post
 

A bit surprised that the Windows Mobile graph shows more of a tendency toward cheaper devices than Android.  I haven't seen many Windows Phone devices in the wild but they've all been high end Lumias.

I'm not surprised at all. Microsoft switched strategy after they realize they couldn't compete in the high end. They removed the license fee so that manufacturers could target the low end. It's funny that their market share is falling despite the fire sales going on. http://www.neowin.net/news/lumia-520-drops-to-3999-off-contract-but-only-for-today

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post #24 of 75
The iphone 4 which is available in some countries is $299 USD.

Lumia/Nokia sells a $25 phone in India.

Plus it's time for IDC to recognize Google Android and Forked Android as it's a different OS.
post #25 of 75
An increasing number of analysts is saying that Microsoft should just give up, and cut their losses. (One analyst invented the term "Zuned out" to describe what happens when a company waits for major players to prove that a marketplace is lucrative before getting into it - too late.)

Makes me think back to Microsoft employees' 2010 funeral for the iPhone (http://www.businessinsider.com/microsoft-iphone-funeral-2010-9?op=1), as they wanted to believe that Windows Phone was going to overwhelm the competition. Oh, the irony, as mourners become the mourned.
post #26 of 75

Given IDC's track record, this probably means that Tizen has something like a 7% market share by now.

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post #27 of 75

Seems as share increases for Android, people get more and more defensive. If IDC is making up numbers or misreporting, or unfairly reporting, the same can be said for the comments in this thread that say, "well, but".

 

At the end of the day, Android, phones on par with the iPhone, are probably a good chunk of the percentages and are far above iOS.

 

Yes, I've used the crappy Samsung Android phones that are subpar, used one in Thailand, not on the same level in any way with iOS or Galaxy S3 phones.

 

The question is, how premium can Apple be? It's their choice. Maybe it will end up a lot like years ago, when Windows took over MacOS (We owned Macs in those days).

 

One day it could happen. Android is very much good enough for most people AND HTC or some other company come out with a cheaper AND super-fantastic (or good enough) phone that will beat the pants off Apple.

 

That is, people will say, why am I paying $800 for a phone (I know what I'm talking about, because I bought FOUR this year in cash.)

 

Android may almost be there where I'd switch.

 

We at the point that we don't want to upgrade and pay the Apple premium.

 

The Apple will be caught with its pants down. Or seem with its pants down and lose market share even more and panic a bit, maybe even lower prices.

 

I pray for the day that Android gets a lot better and on par (to me) with iOS. I bought three Android tablets that crapped out and won't go that road again (all refurbished - 2 Nexus and one Amazon tablet).

 

When Android is closely on par with Apple, and Apple really gets some serious competiton, either Apple will continue to keep coming out with snazzy new phones, or budge a little and decide that the best device is not always the winnner (Sony Beta, everyone likes to quote/reference).

 

Sure, my MacSE was superior to Windows 3.1 back in the day, but that didn't prevent Apple from losing because they gouged their customers because of a superior device at a superior price.

 

We were recently at a laser light show put on at a dam near us. Everyone but us had Android phones.

 

Be an Apple fan all you want, but denial and red herrings are just denial and red herrings.

post #28 of 75
The Korean chappies who pay for the info just love this stuff I wonder how they keep their jobs.

I guess MS and BB did not pay the money this month or they could have had a respectable 20% each
post #29 of 75

so if only 20% of Android phones are over 400+ and the total number of headset are 255.3.... Android is still moving more phones over 400+ compared to iOS

 

20% of 255 = 50.1 (in millions) handset over 400+ - seeing how Apple total is 35.2 (all tiers included)

post #30 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crowley View Post

A bit surprised that the Windows Mobile graph shows more of a tendency toward cheaper devices than Android.  I haven't seen many Windows Phone devices in the wild but they've all been high end Lumias.

Windows Phones are defiantly more popular in Europe. There isn't an single mobile provider here in Switzerland who doesnt't carry them, even the Nokia Lumia 2520 tablet is highly popular. Orange for instance has a Nokia 930 and 2520 combo deal that is constantly sold out. I had to wait almost a month for mine, the reason why I didn't simply buy one from a local dealer was the keyboard, Orange bundled it with the package at no additional cost, a 180CHF savings. I gave the phone to my son because I am very happy with my 1020, the 930 though is a really nice phone, very attractive and probably the fastest phone I have every used next to the iPhone.
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post #31 of 75

I agree, I like the high end Windows Phones a lot, and even the mid-range ones seem pretty good.  Defiance!

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post #32 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by PScooter63 View Post
 

 

Aren't they occasionally cited by Apple brass?

 

Yes, Apple PR will use their numbers when they are good for Apple PR. But their numbers are so clearly made up or based on things so vague that their "information" is really just wild guesses.  So my question is: does anyone really believe their numbers?

post #33 of 75

It's hard to imagine how Microsoft spent all that money acquiring Nokia and the Windows Phone platform remains on a decline.  I'm not saying it's written in stone to remain this way but Microsoft has a long uphill battle to even slightly turn things around.  It seems the most likely way would be for Microsoft to incur more financial losses to gain market share by trying to undercut whole bunches of smaller companies.  I'm sure Microsoft has the funds to do it but unless they can come out with some pretty special smartphones, the future of Windows Phone OS honestly doesn't look all that promising for the next few years.

post #34 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleSince86 View Post

An increasing number of analysts is saying that Microsoft should just give up, and cut their losses. (One analyst invented the term "Zuned out" to describe what happens when a company waits for major players to prove that a marketplace is lucrative before getting into it - too late.)

Makes me think back to Microsoft employees' 2010 funeral for the iPhone (http://www.businessinsider.com/microsoft-iphone-funeral-2010-9?op=1), as they wanted to believe that Windows Phone was going to overwhelm the competition. Oh, the irony, as mourners become the mourned.

I hope not as I really like the platform. It's a real phone OS, so many platforms try to be both a phone and a tablet that you get kind of overwhelmed. I'm just so much faster with my Nokia 1020 then with say my Nexus 5 and now that the new 8.1 has finally added those missing features that made the platform kind of week like; notifications, quick setting tongles and even Cortana (Siri Clone) it's even better. Even the apps have caught up somewhat, there is no longer any apps that iOS or Android have that I want, their all available for WM8.1. It's just a good, fast, stable, handsome looking system, so I would be crushed if Microsoft took it away from me now that I am finally enjoying it, it's just something different then simply having a grid of apps on a screen. Even the hardware that runs the OS is top notch, I have never experienced any lag with my Nokia 1020, the new 930 is just blazing fast and that screen is beautiful, not to mention the cameras in both models are the best you can get in a mobile phone today.
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post #35 of 75
hahahahahaha! Wait, Apple holds 3.6% of the market but sucks 80% of all money in the market. Apple must be a genius! Android tactics is simple:

1. install android in all crappy devices you find and call that device a smartphone.
2. count the number of sales to retailers as real sales
3. BOOM, now you are the "leader" of the market.

But wait, people who buy your "smartphones" don't give a shit to app stores, buying music, buying videos and apps, browsing the web, sending emails, etc., they just make phone calls.

Now you are the king of beggars. While you brag about your leadership, Apple is on the other side of the market with their vacuum cleaners on full steam, sucking all the money on the market and you are fighting with other beggars to get some crumbles.

Android leadership is so crappy that the iPhone appears in all charts as the most used device, most used camera on flickr and instagram, most web traffic, etc. Where are all those trillions of android devices? being used as paper weight?
post #36 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by Relic View Post

So many platforms try to be both a phone and a tablet that you get kind of overwhelmed.

 

Because learning a separate OS for each device is so much easier and intuitive... wait, what?

 

(And what about that Windows Everywhere marketing push?)

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post #37 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by jason98 View Post

So I am with my $700 iPhone starting wondering how Apple can even compete with these phones...

That's the same line they've been using since 2007.
Quote:
Originally Posted by agramonte View Post

so if only 20% of Android phones are over 400+ and the total number of headset are 255.3.... Android is still moving more phones over 400+ compared to iOS

20% of 255 = 50.1 (in millions) handset over 400+ - seeing how Apple total is 35.2 (all tiers included)

These are IDC numbers. Take them with a grain of salt.
post #38 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by jason98 View Post
 

 

Two of my colleagues (both make well above 6 figure for the reference) bought  Lumia 520 for about $100 unlocked.

Maybe camera is shitty but UI is smooth as silk from what I've seen.

 

So I am with my $700 iPhone starting wondering how Apple can even compete with these phones...

 

I don't think Apple will be able to continue with profit margins of 30% and 40+% on the iPhone forever, but you have to remember that Apple uses the money they make here to reinvest in their ecosystem.

 

None of the Android OEMs make enough money solely on hardware to support a modern mobile ecosystem (Samsung tries, but the result isn't pretty); they rely almost completely on Google for that. And Google itself couldn't maintain its Android ecosystem if it relied solely on Android profits....its all heavily subsidize by its ad and non-Android revenue. The same goes with Microsoft and their OEMs.

 

The money for Apple's greater ecosystem has to come from somewhere and right now they are milking the iPhone for that.

 

The question is, which model (Apple's or Google's) can be sustained long term? If Google's model is good long term, Apple might have a problem keeping their high profit margins. If Google's Android OEMs continue loosing money and more go out of business, those great cheap high-end Android phones may start disappearing and the pressure on Apple will completely disappear with them.

post #39 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by agramonte View Post
 

so if only 20% of Android phones are over 400+ and the total number of headset are 255.3.... Android is still moving more phones over 400+ compared to iOS

 

20% of 255 = 50.1 (in millions) handset over 400+ - seeing how Apple total is 35.2 (all tiers included)

This is the reason why Apple took most of the profits. Because their phones are in high end segment which gave bigger profit margin. 60% android phones are junks and 20% android mid range are semi-junks...seriously.

post #40 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by JamesTheLesser View Post
 

 

I don't think Apple will be able to continue with profit margins of 30% and 40+% on the iPhone forever, but you have to remember that Apple uses the money they make here to reinvest in their ecosystem.

 

Before you say that, look at BMW, their margin never changed for decades. It's about brand image that Apple build into loyal customers and new comers too. Ask a BMW owner what car would they want to get next time: a honda, toyota, ford or GM? Don't think so.

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