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While 91% of Apple users run iOS 7, five different versions of Android hold 10%+ share - Page 4

post #121 of 183
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post
But it does mean it's way more adaptable than other mobile OS'es. Setting aside the flame wars for a moment I think it's incredible how useful and widespread Android has become, and all in less than 6 years! Medical systems, sound and media devices, tablets and smartphones, security systems, robotics, defense. . .

I doubt Google, much less anyone else, could have anticipated how successful the OS would be. That there's 1000's of devices depending on it today is a testament to its vibrancy.

 

Defense and Medical Systems running on Android???!!!

I'd be weary to the extreme of such systems, is there even a version of Android certified and indemnified for safety-critical use?

 

I fail to comprehend what advantage Android brings to such systems over the already established OSes with a proven record such as the various Linux and Unix systems, QNX or even Windows Server.

post #122 of 183
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChiA View Post

This is very bad news for Google in the long run, the high-end Android makers are likely to jump ship into Windows mobile or Tizen, leaving Android on the cheap Chinese handsets and the many Android forks, most of which won't generate revenue for Google.
I realize you and others are rooting for Tizen to destroy Android but IMHO it's a dead end wish. Even Sammy can't make Tizen a success.
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post #123 of 183
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post #124 of 183
Originally Posted by archurban View Post
well, it doesn't matter how many people use the most recent version of mobile OS. android is still used by majority of people. it says 90% in the world. iOS is barely catching 10%.

 

Well, no. Keep thinking that “sales” are indicative of use and you’ll start getting offers for suspension bridges.

 

Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post
But it does mean it's way more adaptable than other mobile OS'es.

 

No, it means it’s cheaper. Period.

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already fucked.

 

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Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already fucked.

 

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post #125 of 183
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

No, it means it’s cheaper. Period.

Nope. Apple wouldn't let iOS be modified for 3rd party uses at any price. Nor will Microsoft allow their their mobile OS to be "forked" for specialty needs Android is absolutely more adaptable...
Period. (smiling)
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post #126 of 183
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post
Nope.


Except no, we don’t have any indication whatsoever that the inherent hackability of Android lends itself better to any field. There’s a reason businesses of all sorts forgo it for a real platform. Android “sells” because it’s cheaper in third world countries.

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already fucked.

 

Reply

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already fucked.

 

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post #127 of 183
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

No, it means it’s cheaper. Period.

Nope. Apple wouldn't let iOS be modified for 3rd party uses at any price. Nor will Microsoft allow their their mobile OS to be "forked" for specialty needs Android is absolutely more adaptable...
Period. (smiling)

 

There are over 1 million third party apps for iOS. What are you smoking?

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post #128 of 183
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Originally Posted by Benjamin Frost View Post

There are over 1 million third party apps for iOS. What are you smoking?

You can sometimes say really strange things. How are those 3rd parties changing Apple's iOS code for their own uses? Hint: They aren't. Try again.
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post #129 of 183
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post
I realize you and others are rooting for Tizen to destroy Android but IMHO it's a dead end wish. Even Sammy can't make Tizen a success.

 

Now you're putting words into my mouth, I'm not rooting for Tizen or even iOS.

Even if I were rooting for a particular OS it's out of my hands as I'm not involved in OS design, promotion or marketing.

 

Google is not a charity, it's in the business of making money and it created Android with a view to creating money.

The question is how efficient and intelligent it is in this pursuit.

 

It's all very well that Android is hackable and widely used in various devices including medical systems, but with Android being given freely away, very few of these things actually generate income for Google.

One key difference between the Windows versus Mac OS and Android versus iOS battle: Microsoft made money from its Windows licensing fee.

 

In the long run, for the reasons given in my earlier post, fragmentation and the inability to make official updates dooms Android to being used for embedded systems or low-end near disposable handsets, the race to bottom.

post #130 of 183
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChiA View Post

Now you're putting words into my mouth, I'm not rooting for Tizen or even iOS.
Even if I were rooting for a particular OS it's out of my hands as I'm not involved in OS design, promotion or marketing.

Google is not a charity, it's in the business of making money and it created Android with a view to creating money.
The question is how efficient and intelligent it is in this pursuit.

It's all very well that Android is hackable and widely used in various devices including medical systems, but with Android being given freely away, very few of these things actually generate income for Google.
One key difference between the Windows versus Mac OS and Android versus iOS battle: Microsoft made money from its Windows licensing fee.

Have you ever read the history of Android, and why Google bought and developed it into a full-fledged mobile OS (Rubin once thought cameras were the best use)? It was not about Apple or iPhones. Heck, the iPhone wasn't even a glimmer in Steve Jobs eye when Google started working on the Android Project. The danger to Google came from Microsoft and their vision of mobile, which did not include a promotion of Google services. The idea was to develop a Microsoft-competing mobile OS to give manufacturers a viable option to WinMo, thus keeping Google in the mobile revenue picture. If MS had their way Google would be sweeping up the leftovers from Microsoft's lunch.

So were they successful? Overwhelmingly so I'd say.
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChiA View Post

In the long run, for the reasons given in my earlier post, fragmentation and the inability to make official updates dooms Android to being used for embedded systems...

AOSP gets updates. Visit their page to have a look for yourself. If manufacturers want to create a custom piece of machinery with an embedded OS based on Android then it would obviously be that manufacturer taking care of maintenance. Google wouldn't have created it. The end-user may not even be aware their new toy is based on Android code. Fragmentation? Most embedded systems would not be using Google services and so waiting on a Google Android update to pass carrier review. Google along with other individuals and organizations will contribute updates and new functions to the open-source project the manufacturer can use to update/modify their own product if they wish. Pretty straightforward.
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post #131 of 183
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post
Heck, the iPhone wasn't even a glimmer in Steve Jobs eye when Google started working on the Android Project.


Not only does the timeline refute that, Google’s CEO openly admits to throwing out what they were working on once he saw the iPhone.

 

Try harder.

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already fucked.

 

Reply

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already fucked.

 

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post #132 of 183
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post


Not only does the timeline refute that, Google’s CEO openly admits to throwing out what they were working on once he saw the iPhone.

Try harder.

Feel free to post the iPhone timeline TS. Hint: Look around mid to late 2005 for the start. Several sources point to September as the month Jobs gave the iPhone the green-light, with a company wide commitment by November or so. Credit Apple's Project Purple tablet effort for some of the groundwork, making the iPhone fast-tracking possible. By the way saying it wasn't even a glimmer in his eye was over-reaching I'll admit. Jobs had considered it at different times, even had Moto build 'em a phone in 2004. Just never got past the talking stage about building an iPhone of their own until later half of 2005.

Goog was already invested in Android before the end of 2004, owning them outright by very late 2004/early 2005 according to the ones that were there. With Apple having no mobile phone of their own under development, no mobile-specific OS of their own at the time and no indication either they were even committed to creating a mobile OS it should be kinda obvious who Google was concerned with... and it wasn't Apple.

After the iPhone was revealed? Heck yeah Google took notice. Who didn't? Google rightly recognized they had some work ahead of them if they were going to offer a desirable alternative so that the manufacturers didn't look to Microsoft to keep them in the game.

That it became personal with Mr. Jobs is unfortunate and should have been avoidable IMO. Google was not out to harm Apple. They were looking out for their own interests, with the threat from Microsoft at the top of the list. As it turned out Apple became a bigger enemy. Forging a partnership with them and dumping Android would not have guaranteed it wouldn't have happened anyway. Jobs was lobbing threats at Google even before the iPhone became reality, and it was not about Android either. Jobs made a lot of things personal over the years, both a strength and a weakness for him.




Sidenote for those that were unaware: Sammy coulda had Android in the fall of 2004 but didn't have the vision for it.
Edited by Gatorguy - 8/26/14 at 6:04am
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post #133 of 183
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nobodyy View Post

 

These articles point out some good things I agree with - Screen sizes are what they address mostly, it's not that hard, right. However, across densities and and sizes - it's more to think about for someone who isn't familiar requiring more time to learn. - Google is containing their Play Services to update themselves independently of the OS - which is good for Google and to me to some degree

 

However, these articles don't really address my problems which is the vast differences of API's available - and in some cases the flat out failure of manufacturers to correctly support their hardware. I'm not trying to claim to be the majority, but it is hard to target those features offered by and across Android versions for an incoming devs who are unfamiliar, myself included after a nice chunk of time dedicated to learning the OS. 

 

It isn't shit, no. 

But it's a pain in the ass that is discouraging.

 


As an Android user, in large part because the phones and service I can afford happen to align with Android phones, I can honestly call the articles BS. In the last year, I've gone from one brand new Gingerbread phone which crapped out to another which I spent morst of my time fighting the urge to smash with a brick (and I could still buy new) to a Kit Kat phone which is decent but has a few flabbergasting behaviors. Despite the fact the first two had the same brand, OS version, processor, and screen resolution, I could only use half the Apps on both Gingerbread phones. Then a bunch of the Apps I would have liked would run on Gingerbread at all because the makers decided despite the face someone could cheaply buy a Gingerbread phone, you needed to have at least Jellybean and not even apps that should have required any features not already available in Froyo or Gingerbread at that. Oh and my current Kit Kat phone, it's stuck at 4.4.0. Why? Because LG (and and practically every network that carries that model) decided that particular model does have the sales to justify an upgrade release and the only phones with upgrades on my particular network are the iPhone (which would cost me at least $400-odd) and any unlocked upgradeable Android phone capable of accepting a sim card which you may own.
Edited by ScifiterX - 8/26/14 at 8:07pm
post #134 of 183
Quote:
Originally Posted by ScifiterX View Post

^ post

Boy, that sounds like a piss-poor experience. Still on Android? If so, cost-wise?
Edited by PhilBoogie - 8/26/14 at 10:54pm
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post #135 of 183
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Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post


Not only does the timeline refute that, Google’s CEO openly admits to throwing out what they were working on once he saw the iPhone.

Try harder.

The idea of making a mobile OS remained static. They only altered the type of device it would run on. Say what you may about Google, but they were at least smart enough to see that Apple was on to something. Those that failed to see it are dead, or dying.
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post #136 of 183
Quote:
Originally Posted by PhilBoogie View Post


Boy, that sounds like a piss-poor experience. Still on Android? If so, cost-wise?

 

It does suck. My first Android phone was awesome when it first game out. By the time the contract was up I was very frustrated with the old OS version and the fragmented app support. That's why I switched to t-mobile and a Nexus 4. Now I have the latest OS version the same week that Google announces it, no fragmentation experiences at all, and I'm $30/month with unlimited data and no contract.

 

My wife's first iPhone experience was much more pleasant than my first Android experience once I'd missed out on a few system updates b/c of carrier/mfgr lameness.

post #137 of 183
Quote:
Originally Posted by waterrockets View Post

My wife's first iPhone experience was much more pleasant than my first Android experience once I'd missed out on a few system updates b/c of carrier/mfgr lameness.

The fault falls to Google first. It's not as if Google starts building their Nexus updates at the same time they give the builds to the carriers and vendors. Google has a huge lead as well as other advantages. It's only latter when the carrier makes a promise they can't keep or decides not to do it because there weren't enough sales to warrant the cost that some of the blame shifts, but the initial fault will always be Google.

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post #138 of 183
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post


The fault falls to Google first. It's not as if Google starts building their Nexus updates at the same time they give the builds to the carriers and vendors. Google has a huge lead as well as other advantages. It's only latter when the carrier makes a promise they can't keep or decides not to do it because there weren't enough sales to warrant the cost that some of the blame shifts, but the initial fault will always be Google.

 

I don't buy it. Even a three month delay would be fine (not that it would come to that). The carriers and mfgrs are lame because they're trying to pull revenue out of their ass will their own app stores, pay navigation, ridiculous skinning, etc. If they just stuck to selling data, voice, and text, and would compete in the software environment of the Play Store with their stupid apps, then they would have no reason not to push updates once Google made them available. Instead, they can't do it because it would mean getting all the poorly developed apps and skins up to speed on a platform that they are no longer interested in supporting because it's not in their latest commercials.

post #139 of 183
Quote:
Originally Posted by waterrockets View Post

I don't buy it. Even a three month delay would be fine (not that it would come to that). The carriers and mfgrs are lame because they're trying to pull revenue out of their ass will their own app stores, pay navigation, ridiculous skinning, etc. If they just stuck to selling data, voice, and text, and would compete in the software environment of the Play Store with their stupid apps, then they would have no reason not to push updates once Google made them available. Instead, they can't do it because it would mean getting all the poorly developed apps and skins up to speed on a platform that they are no longer interested in supporting because it's not in their latest commercials.

There is nothing too buy. That's the truth. Google is to blame for the initial delay and for setting up this shitty system in the first place. The carriers and vendors are to blame for all the other aspects you mentioned. No matter you split the blame, Google started it.

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post #140 of 183
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

The fault falls to Google first. It's not as if Google starts building their Nexus updates at the same time they give the builds to the carriers and vendors. Google has a huge lead as well as other advantages. It's only latter when the carrier makes a promise they can't keep or decides not to do it because there weren't enough sales to warrant the cost that some of the blame shifts, but the initial fault will always be Google.

Google doesn't give their builds to anyone. Current and previous builds are on their servers for anyone to take. A manufacturer took the build off Google's servers when they initially built a phone, and it's on them to take subsequent builds, and customize it to their devices.
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post #141 of 183
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

The fault falls to Google first. It's not as if Google starts building their Nexus updates at the same time they give the builds to the carriers and vendors. Google has a huge lead as well as other advantages. It's only latter when the carrier makes a promise they can't keep or decides not to do it because there weren't enough sales to warrant the cost that some of the blame shifts, but the initial fault will always be Google.

Soli, Google Android updates are ready to deliver to stock devices (ie Nexus) within days of their official release, really no different than iOS updates. Even Apple can't release OS updates until the carriers are done testing and sign off on 'em. The difference comes into play with the various manufacturers who don't feel the same urgency. Moto would be one exception, readying some updates within a week or so of Nexus updates.

If Apple licensed iOS they might see some of the same update delays from licensees and higher levels of "fragmentation". . .
Google might have no update delays nor any more fragmentation than Apple if they only sold their own devices instead of licensing.
Edited by Gatorguy - 8/27/14 at 8:47am
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post #142 of 183
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

There is nothing too buy. That's the truth. Google is to blame for the initial delay and for setting up this shitty system in the first place. The carriers and vendors are to blame for all the other aspects you mentioned. No matter you split the blame, Google started it.

You know the whole 'horse' and 'water' thingy, with OS updates being the water, and manufacters being the horse. I will agree that it's Google's fault for setting it up like that. Sometimes a seemingly good idea turns out to be a bad reality.
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post #143 of 183

Regardless, none of this is my problem. I have the latest OS and I have Tasker, so I'm happy.

post #144 of 183
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

Soli, Google Android updates are ready to deliver to stock devices (ie Nexus) within days of their official release, really no different than iOS updates. Even Apple can't release OS updates until the carriers are done testing and sign off on 'em. The difference comes into play with the various manufacturers who don't feel the same urgency. Moto would be one exception, readying some updates within a week or so of Nexus updates.

If Apple licensed iOS they might see some of the same update delays from licensees and higher levels of "fragmentation". . .
Google might have no update delays nor any more fragmentation than Apple if they only sold their own devices instead of licensing.

That's my point. Google has a huge lead in developing Android for Nexus before the carriers and vendors can start to build and test for their HW, networks, and (unfortunately) their bolted on SW. If Nexus was more popular I'd see this as an unfair advantage for Google.

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post #145 of 183
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

That's my point. Google has a huge lead in developing Android for Nexus before the carriers and vendors can start to build and test for their HW, networks, and (unfortunately) their bolted on SW. If Nexus was more popular I'd see this as an unfair advantage for Google.

I'm not sure if the "huge lead" is true. Moto had KitKat updates out to the Moto G and X within three weeks of release and just a few days after the Nexus models started getting them. Moto says they got the Google updates at the same time as other vendors with no unfair "secret advance". My guess is they're telling the truth since HTC was only a week behind Moto.
http://arstechnica.com/gadgets/2014/08/the-state-of-android-updates-whos-fast-whos-slow-and-why/
Edited by Gatorguy - 8/27/14 at 9:21am
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post #146 of 183
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

I'm not sure if the "huge lead" is true. Moto had KitKat updates out to the Moto G and X within three weeks of release. Both Google and Moto say they got the Google updates at the same time as other vendors with no "secret advance". My guess is they're telling the truth since HTC was only a week behind Moto, taking about a month before the carrier's signed off.
http://arstechnica.com/gadgets/2014/08/the-state-of-android-updates-whos-fast-whos-slow-and-why/

1) Didn't Google control Moto during those releases? If so, that negates Moto as an example.

2) If Google's Nexus team(s) aren't getting a head start on Android and the fault resides, say, with carriers and vendors' bolted on SW then that would put more fault on them, but it still comes back to Google designing a poor system that makes for an awful upgrade experience for users.

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post #147 of 183
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

1) Didn't Google control Moto during those releases? If so, that negates Moto as an example.

Why? The Moto X didn't initially ship with the latest OS version tho it was available. That's evidence that they did not receive preferential treatment over the other OEM's isn't it? Add to that Google's assurance Moto would not receive software updates before anyone else and zero evidence that they've not followed thru on their word.

If you read the link I offered to the ARS article it explains why Moto is able to do a better job on timely updates than say Samsung, and advance access to Google updates isn't mentioned as a reason.
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post #148 of 183
Quote:
Originally Posted by PhilBoogie View Post


Boy, that sounds like a piss-poor experience. Still on Android? If so, cost-wise?

 

Could be worse. Still on android, for a bit. Things got tolerable-ish once I got the Kit Kat phone, so I am holding off on an iPhone until I get some other items I need and want (including a replacement computer) and money was a big factor in that decision. $30 for a prepaid smartphone and $45/mo is a big deal when you are low income. I'm just hoping it holds up for a while as it'll take time to save up for everything else then have money for an iPhone.


Edited by ScifiterX - 8/27/14 at 12:40pm
post #149 of 183
Quote:
Originally Posted by waterrockets View Post


It does suck. My first Android phone was awesome when it first game out. By the time the contract was up I was very frustrated with the old OS version and the fragmented app support. That's why I switched to t-mobile and a Nexus 4. Now I have the latest OS version the same week that Google announces it, no fragmentation experiences at all, and I'm $30/month with unlimited data and no contract.

My wife's first iPhone experience was much more pleasant than my first Android experience once I'd missed out on a few system updates b/c of carrier/mfgr lameness.

I'd say you made a sound decision by getting the Nexus. Next year I'd get the Silver, instead of some 3rd party phone which won't guarantee any software updates.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ScifiterX View Post


Could be worse. Still on android, for a bit. Things got tolerable-ish once I got the Kit Kat phone, so I am holding off on an iPhone until I get some other items I need and want (including a replacement computer) and money was a big factor in that decision. $30 for a prepaid smartphone and $45/mo is a big deal when you are low income. I'm just hoping it holds up for a while as it'll take time to save up for everything else then have money for an iPhone.

It sucks that these phones have become so expensive. Especially if you want or need other CE as well.

I remember my first iPhone: €50 on a 2 year contract which was only €10 more for Internet access (€25 in total per month) boy have things changed.
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post #150 of 183
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Originally Posted by PhilBoogie View Post

I'd say you made a sound decision by getting the Nexus. Next year I'd get the Silver, instead of some 3rd party phone which won't guarantee any software updates.

 

Yeah, that's the plan. I'm sure something will be announced next month and up on the Play Store in October, and I'll likely buy that.

post #151 of 183
Quote:
Originally Posted by waterrockets View Post

Yeah, that's the plan. I'm sure something will be announced next month and up on the Play Store in October, and I'll likely buy that.

The new Moto X will be announced on September 4th, and the new Nexus in Oct/Nov.
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post #152 of 183

Quoted:

"It sucks that these phones have become so expensive. Especially if you want or need other CE as well."

 

Isn't it amazing how you can buy a fully-functional Android 4.4.3 tablet with everything but Bluetooth at Walmart for $79 with an 8" screen where everything is the same EXCEPT for the Bluetooth most don't use and, of course, the phone chipset for $500-$800 from any carrier?  Somebody's getting screwed and it's US!

post #153 of 183
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Originally Posted by dasanman69 View Post


The new Moto X will be announced on September 4th, and the new Nexus in Oct/Nov.

 

Yeah, we'll see. I'm not interested in any other company's spin on the OS, so the Moto is unlikely.

post #154 of 183
Quote:
Originally Posted by waterrockets View Post

Yeah, we'll see. I'm not interested in any other company's spin on the OS, so the Moto is unlikely.

Moto has been staying pretty close to stock, a major reason for their recent exceptionally fast updates, lagging the Nexus by only a couple of weeks. with the previous Moto X. Their other advantage?" Updating Moto specific apps via Google Play, decoupling them from the OS and allowing for more frequent feature improvements.
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post #155 of 183
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Originally Posted by waterrockets View Post

Yeah, we'll see. I'm not interested in any other company's spin on the OS, so the Moto is unlikely.

Moto just adds some features, but the look and feel is pretty much stock Android. I remember the initial reviews being lackluster, then suddenly everyone was raving about the dynamic notifications.
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post #156 of 183
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Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post


Moto has been staying pretty close to stock, a major reason for their recent exceptionally fast updates, lagging the Nexus by only a couple of weeks. with the previous Moto X. Their other advantage?" Updating Moto specific apps via Google Play, decoupling them from the OS and allowing for more frequent feature improvements.

 

Yeah, I'm still not convinced. I just saw stories last week about the Moto getting 4.4.4. I've had it long enough that I'm wondering when 4.4.5 is landing -- I'm kind of disappointed they're this far behind. I had it in mid-July. I would be frustrated when L comes out to wait 7 weeks.

post #157 of 183
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Originally Posted by waterrockets View Post

Yeah, I'm still not convinced. I just saw stories last week about the Moto getting 4.4.4. I've had it long enough that I'm wondering when 4.4.5 is landing -- I'm kind of disappointed they're this far behind. I had it in mid-July. I would be frustrated when L comes out to wait 7 weeks.

The Verizon Moto X got 4.4.4 a month after release, the other carrier versions 2-3 weeks later. Not perfect but light years better than other devices.
"Few things are harder to put up with than the annoyance of a good example" Mark Twain
"Just because something is deemed the law doesn't make it just" - SolipsismX
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"Few things are harder to put up with than the annoyance of a good example" Mark Twain
"Just because something is deemed the law doesn't make it just" - SolipsismX
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post #158 of 183
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Originally Posted by dasanman69 View Post

The Verizon Moto X got 4.4.4 a month after release, the other carrier versions 2-3 weeks later. Not perfect but light years better than other devices.

Exactly. Some manufacturers are on the ball with updates. And we should applaud them.

But we spend a little too much time talking about the big manufacturers (Samsung, LG, Motorola, HTC, etc) and their popular phones.

As it turns out... "Android" is made up of much more than just those handful of manufacturers. Remember how big that "Others" category is?

So when there are reports of "Android" being spread across 5 or 6 different versions... it's the fault of all those other manufacturers who never provide an update.

And there's really nothing Google can do about that. The genie is out of the bottle... with 50 manufacturers making "Android" phones with no requirement to stay up-to-date.

There are tons of phones being sold today with NOT the current version of Android. And they will likely never get an update either.

I have a feeling that "Android" will always resemble the hodgepodge of versions in the pie chart below:



So... does it really matter?

If I understand correctly... Google Play Services can provide all the new APIs featured in the latest version of Android even if you're stuck using an "old" version of Android. (someone correct me if I'm wrong)

Are security updates handled the same way? How important are X.X.X releases? I honestly don't know.

There will always be a substantial amount of Android devices (over a billion?) which DON'T have the current version of Android and never will.

I'm just not sure of the severity of that.
post #159 of 183
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Originally Posted by Michael Scrip View Post

If I understand correctly... Google Play Services can provide all the new APIs featured in the latest version of Android even if you're stuck using an "old" version of Android. (someone correct me if I'm wrong)
 

 

The Android app manifest (created by the developer) has a "min-sdk-version," and will not install on any systems with a lower API level (which is an integer number. Kit Kat is API level 19, for example). Applications are compiled against their min-sdk-version API (binaries) and will be forward compatible with new versions of Android. They will not be able to utilize any API features in future sdk versions though.

 

Here's the documentation: http://developer.android.com/guide/topics/manifest/uses-sdk-element.html

post #160 of 183
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Originally Posted by waterrockets View Post

The Android app manifest (created by the developer) has a "min-sdk-version," and will not install on any systems with a lower API level (which is an integer number. Kit Kat is API level 19, for example). Applications are compiled against their min-sdk-version API (binaries) and will be forward compatible with new versions of Android. They will not be able to utilize any API features in future sdk versions though.

Here's the documentation: http://developer.android.com/guide/topics/manifest/uses-sdk-element.html
"Each successive version of the Android platform can include updates to the Android application framework API that it delivers.

Updates to the framework API are designed so that the new API remains compatible with earlier versions of the API. That is, most changes in the API are additive and introduce new or replacement functionality. As parts of the API are upgraded, the older replaced parts are deprecated but are not removed, so that existing applications can still use them. In a very small number of cases, parts of the API may be modified or removed, although typically such changes are only needed to ensure API robustness and application or system security. All other API parts from earlier revisions are carried forward without modification."
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