or Connect
AppleInsider › Forums › Mobile › iPhone › While 91% of Apple users run iOS 7, five different versions of Android hold 10%+ share
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

While 91% of Apple users run iOS 7, five different versions of Android hold 10%+ share - Page 2

post #41 of 183
Quote:
Originally Posted by bradipao View Post

From a "developer" point of view today android fragmentation is extremely low. It was a problem ith GingerBread (2.3.x), but API difference between all 4.x versions are negligible. Basically all the functions/services/effects are available across the 4.x releases. It means you can target about 85% of Android devices with a single binary. It could be a problem again with next release (Android-L) that should contain an under-the-hood overhaul of the UI framework, with several incompatibilities.

You're right... 85% of Android users can take advantage of the features across Android 4.X dating back to 2011.

So to be safe... a developer should target Android 4.0 to reach the most users. You have to appeal to the lowest common denominator.

But if there was some amazing feature introduced in Android 4.4.... the audience is MUCH smaller since not many people have Android 4.4

And that's the struggle. Android has a lot of users... but not many of them can use the latest features in the current version of Android. Developers are forced to look back instead of moving forward.

And it will only get worse. Google announced 5,000 new APIs with Android L. Great, right?

But if a developer wanted to use those APIs in their apps... the devices would need Android L

Looking back at history... it takes YEARS for any particular version of Android to reach a meaningful percentage of Android users.

Developers will ignore those 5,000 new APIs in Android L and continue to support Android 4.X instead.

It might take until 2016 or 2017 until enough phones can support the features of Android L and above.
post #42 of 183
Quote:
Originally Posted by PhilBoogie View Post

Now I don't know what to make of it all. Are you saying that the 'Google Plays Services' are installed on 93% of HW developed/designed/manufactured by Google? So not on, say, Samsung devices? Though Samsung has a way with putting their name on other brands as well, but this is just completely OT:

http://www.samsung.com/us/news/newsRead.do?news_seq=2828



edit: replaced pic with a better one

Devices running Google Android. That would include those from Samsung. And HTC. And Motorola. And etc. It would NOT include Amazon or Nokia (Microsoft) or Xiaomi or various knock-off's with forked OS's.
melior diabolus quem scies
Reply
melior diabolus quem scies
Reply
post #43 of 183
Quote:
Originally Posted by RadarTheKat View Post



Well... the fragmentation issue does not entirely go away from a consumer's perspective just because that consumer has selected only one Android vendor.  Samsung is subject to the reality that Android is not being developed and optimized only for their products.  It's being developed with an express goal of owning the most market share, and as such is necessarily not optimized for any specific segment of the market, such as the enterprise market where built-in security, for example, is highly valued.  Few could make a reasonable argument that Google's patch-via-Google-Play approach to security updates is ideal; it's pragmatic given the security situation created by the OS fragmentation situation Google has found itself faced with, but it's not ideal.  Apple has the better approach, for all phones running iOS; it's incidental to the argument that all those phones happen to come from a single company.

Both solutions have their strengths. Apple could see benefits from a "Google Play Services" approach to speed updates to core services rather than waiting until an OS update is finalized.
melior diabolus quem scies
Reply
melior diabolus quem scies
Reply
post #44 of 183
Quote:
Originally Posted by kpluck View Post

IOS 7, 91% of IOS users. Android 4, 85.7% of Android users. Of course, that doesn't have the click bait ring to it does it?

-kpluck

As a developer, I care more about API numbers than the marketing versions numbers.  Apple only revises their API levels on the major marketing releases (6.0, 7.0, etc), with a few exceptions like 3.2 adding iPad support .  Android can change their API level on a .0.1 update, although recently I will give Google that they are trying to limit API level changes to the .1 updates.  

 

For your example 91% of IOS users are on the current API level, however 85.7% of Android users are spread across the last 6 API levels.  

 

If you want to support at least 50% of the android market with a single app you need to go back to API level 16 released July 2012 (current is 19).  That means that either you don't support the features in the last 3 APIs or you have to start implementing branching based on API level.  Not impossible, but definitely adds to the development cost, complexity and time.

post #45 of 183
Quote:
Originally Posted by kpluck View Post

IOS 7, 91% of IOS users. Android 4, 85.7% of Android users. Of course, that doesn't have the click bait ring to it does it?

-kpluck

 

Straight from the article, "The OpenSignal data breaks down mobile operating system installations based on new application programming interfaces made available to developers ..."

 

So, it doesn't work that way. The API is what is really important since if you use a new API released in 4.4 it won't work on anything lower.

post #46 of 183
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

Devices running Google Android. That would include those from Samsung. And HTC. And Motorola. And etc. It would NOT include Amazon or Nokia (Microsoft) or Xiaomi or various knock-off's with forked OS's.

That's part of the problem with pretty much everything Google does that I have to assume it's purposely done to avoid transparency. You say Google Android to refer to non-forked versions of Android but the forked version are still using Android which comes from Google. To not cal it Android is like saying Android doesn't use Linux simply because Google did their own thing with it.

This issue goes further when they do API changes but still refer to Android by a specific version number which only looks like it's done so they can claim a higher install base for a given arbitrary value to help obfuscate the amount of fragmentation they really have.

But I don't think it's all from a choice to muddle the facts, I think the other part is simply from bad planning, like with their size chart which has a lot of overlap for the various size categories.

I look at all this and think what a nightmare for developers and customers alike.

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

Reply

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

Reply
post #47 of 183
Quote:
Originally Posted by GTR View Post

Let him lie.

It may just be all he has left in life.

(>_<)

A short primer on the proper usage of lay vs. lie. . .
http://www.chompchomp.com/handouts/irregularrules02.pdf

No doubt that's what you meant as it's pretty clear what I had to say was 100% correct, and even verified as such by Eric.
melior diabolus quem scies
Reply
melior diabolus quem scies
Reply
post #48 of 183
This type of article has been written for years and years, month after month, at one publication or another. People got the point.
post #49 of 183
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

Devices running Google Android. That would include those from Samsung. And HTC. And Motorola. And etc. It would NOT include Amazon or Nokia (Microsoft) or Xiaomi or various knock-off's with forked OS's.

Ah, ok. So non-forked SW Android; nothing to do with HW manufacturer. Tnx
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

I look at all this and think what a nightmare for developers and customers alike.

Don't know about devs, but customers will most likely just look at the monthly price for the phone plan and the screen size of a variety of models. But we're techies, and see things differently.
How to enter the Apple logo  on iOS:
/Settings/Keyboard/Shortcut and paste in  which you copied from an email draft or a note. Screendump
Reply
How to enter the Apple logo  on iOS:
/Settings/Keyboard/Shortcut and paste in  which you copied from an email draft or a note. Screendump
Reply
post #50 of 183
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike Eggleston View Post

Ok, wait a second there. There is a very specific reason why this becomes relevant. The market share argument is invalid because Apple give a flying f@ about market share. Their business model doesn't depend on market share, and that is why that argument is invalid. Now, the "inverse" as you call it being fragmentation *IS* important, that being to developers and customers. I will prove this with a very specific argument that any developer can understand: The Browser Wars of the mid-2000s.

For a long time you had two major players in the Browser Wars: Internet Explorer and Netscape/Mozilla. Mozilla had the courage to break off their browser to become Firefox, and part of that was that it was going to be standards-based. This was all well and good, but it was hell on developers. Developers had to do hacks and quirks, css-differing rules, and server-side conditionals to try to get the one page they were working on to work in both environments. It became so difficult that many decided to just focus on either Internet Explorer or Firefox, and it hurt the web for years.

It is this cautionary tale that is happening to Android right now. Since carriers can lock the users into a particular version, you have API fragmentation. The fragmentation makes it incredibly difficult for developers to try to target anyone in the Android universe. Also, since some manufacturers can create a version of Android with their own specific things embedded into it, that just adds to the noise. All of those concerns are what make Android an inferior development platform, even though Google says that it is "Open". iOS may be a closed eco-system, but it is consistent, and it makes sure that you can be kept up to date easily; making the lives of developers that much easier.

Is multiple closed OSs the answer? Will the market sustain 4,5,6 different ecosystems?
"Few things are harder to put up with than the annoyance of a good example" Mark Twain
"Just because something is deemed the law doesn't make it just" - SolipsismX
Reply
"Few things are harder to put up with than the annoyance of a good example" Mark Twain
"Just because something is deemed the law doesn't make it just" - SolipsismX
Reply
post #51 of 183
Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael Scrip View Post

You're right... 85% of Android users can take advantage of the features across Android 4.X dating back to 2011.

So to be safe... a developer should target Android 4.0 to reach the most users. You have to appeal to the lowest common denominator.

But if there was some amazing feature introduced in Android 4.4.... the audience is MUCH smaller since not many people have Android 4.4

And that's the struggle. Android has a lot of users... but not many of them can use the latest features in the current version of Android. Developers are forced to look back instead of moving forward.

And it will only get worse. Google announced 5,000 new APIs with Android L. Great, right?

But if a developer wanted to use those APIs in their apps... the devices would need Android L

Looking back at history... it takes YEARS for any particular version of Android to reach a meaningful percentage of Android users.

Developers will ignore those 5,000 new APIs in Android L and continue to support Android 4.X instead.

It might take until 2016 or 2017 until enough phones can support the features of Android L and above.

Apple leaves out features to older iDevices all the time even if they upgrade to the current version of iOS.
"Few things are harder to put up with than the annoyance of a good example" Mark Twain
"Just because something is deemed the law doesn't make it just" - SolipsismX
Reply
"Few things are harder to put up with than the annoyance of a good example" Mark Twain
"Just because something is deemed the law doesn't make it just" - SolipsismX
Reply
post #52 of 183
Quote:
Originally Posted by dasanman69 View Post

Apple leaves out features to older iDevices all the time even if they upgrade to the current version of iOS.

Features dependent on HW in some way, not APIs.

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

Reply

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

Reply
post #53 of 183
Quote:
Originally Posted by dasanman69 View Post


Is multiple closed OSs the answer? Will the market sustain 4,5,6 different ecosystems?


Let's see here.... We have the Mac OS X, Windows 8.1, and the many distributions of Linux out there... So yeah, I think that the world can handle different ecosystems. The discussion about Android though, is that it is one distribution that has fragmented APIs with a poor upgrading policy. In reality, it is that policy that is causing the problem, not the API fragmentation.

 

So, for example, if iOS could only be upgraded when new devices came out, we would be having this same discussion about iOS; because the number of users out there using out of date software would be huge; instead it is only 9% of the installed iOS base. Android has an issue on their hands when over 70% are not on the latest OS from them; mainly because carriers do not want them to upgrade. Thus, the policy problem on their hands.

-- Mike Eggleston
-- Mac Fanatic since 1984.
-- Proud Member of PETA: People Eating Tasty Animals
-- Wii #: 8913 3004 4519 2027

Reply

-- Mike Eggleston
-- Mac Fanatic since 1984.
-- Proud Member of PETA: People Eating Tasty Animals
-- Wii #: 8913 3004 4519 2027

Reply
post #54 of 183
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post


Wrong sir.
http://googlesystem.blogspot.com/2014/06/google-play-services-delivers-security.html

http://www.techradar.com/us/news/software/applications/updated-google-play-services-5-0-rolls-out-to-nearly-every-android-device-1255989
As of v5 of Google Play Services "the updates services also adds a dynamic security provider allowing developers to rapidly deliver security patches. A necessity in today's world when it seems like some other app has been breached every week."

...and with zero dependence on OEM's or carriers for approval.

FWIW Google reports that 93% of Google Android devices are on version 5.

 

Sure.  Android is so secure....

 

http://www.cnbc.com/id/101940258?__source=yahoo|finance|headline|headline|story&par=yahoo&doc=101940258#.

 

"Your most trustworthy Android apps may be at risk. Researchers say they have found a way to hack Gmail apps with a 92 percent success rate.

In a paper being presented Friday at the Usenix cybersecurity conference, the engineers said they also could steal check images from a Chase app with an 83 percent success rate and hack personal information such as address and Social Security numbers from H&R Block (success rate 92 percent), Newegg (86 percent), WebMD (85 percent), Hotels.com (83 percent) and Amazon (48 percent) apps."

 

I'm sorry.

 

Google can do all the bandaids they want.  The fact is Androids framentation makes it a much bigger security threat.

post #55 of 183
Quote:
Originally Posted by waterrockets View Post
 

FWIW, I'm a developer and Android user, I choose to sidestep fragmentation issues by using Nexus phones. No fragmentation issues for me. Everything works, and it works well. $350 purchase, $30/month unlimited data month-to-month with T-Mobile, and I'm doing fine.

 

The nice thing about iOS is that any limited-intelligence users are going to be brought along with the crowd (for the most part), and kept current. The same group buying Android devices end up running a provider-mangled version of Gingerbread for an entire phone contract because they go for the cheap phones.

 

I think you have to be fairly intentional and thoughtful to have a high-end experience with Android. Occasionally, one of my non-tech friends will ask me if they should switch from iOS to Android, and I tell them "no." Most of my high-tech friends don't need to ask, and they're split pretty evenly between iOS/Android. We'll see if Google is able to bring more phones into the Google Android experience like Nexus over the next couple of years, but I don't see them overcoming the marketing from the cheaper/compromised brands.

 

I did a simular thing except i bought an iPhone 5S.  I'm also with Tmobile.

 

I paid $300 more for my phone but over 2 years that's only $12.50 a month.

Next year I'll be able to sell my 5S for about $200.

So it comes out to $4.17 more per month I paid than you.

 

To me the $4 extra I pay a month for an iPhone is well worth it.

post #56 of 183
I'm sure there are lots of benefits to Android's fragmentation. And I'm sure the geniuses on Wall Street will get right on it and tell us all about them. In related new, Samsung releases another ad showing how bad it is that Apple has so much consistency in their iOS deployment.
post #57 of 183
Quote:
Originally Posted by RadarTheKat View Post

In which case you have fragmentation because some devices (Amazon, Chinese vendors) don't connect to Google Play, and others aren't updated even though they conceivably could be.  Which is just another dimension of fragmentation introduced in an effort to roll out security updates across a fragmented core OS that cannot be updated on many devices for either device compatibility reasons or device vendor negligence (they don;t work to offer the updates, preferring their customers to be forced to buy a new handset or tablet).  

So is "Google's Android" and AOSP the same thing? Does Google have any control over what Amazon or Chinese vendors do with open source Android? What devices from members of the open handset alliance don't receive updates via the Google Play store?
post #58 of 183
Quote:
Originally Posted by sog35 View Post


I'm sorry.

Google can do all the bandaids they want.  The fact is Androids framentation makes it a much bigger security threat.


Less secure than un-jailbroken iOS? I fully agree. That does not mean Google Android is therefore dangerously insecure.
melior diabolus quem scies
Reply
melior diabolus quem scies
Reply
post #59 of 183

Who gives a damn about their share. Androiders should be far more concerned about stuff like this: http://nyti.ms/1oZdnPE

post #60 of 183
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

Features dependent on HW in some way, not APIs.

Does the reason really matter? A missing feature is a missing feature no matter how you look at it.
"Few things are harder to put up with than the annoyance of a good example" Mark Twain
"Just because something is deemed the law doesn't make it just" - SolipsismX
Reply
"Few things are harder to put up with than the annoyance of a good example" Mark Twain
"Just because something is deemed the law doesn't make it just" - SolipsismX
Reply
post #61 of 183
Quote:
Originally Posted by sog35 View Post
 

 

I did a simular thing except i bought an iPhone 5S.  I'm also with Tmobile.

 

I paid $300 more for my phone but over 2 years that's only $12.50 a month.

Next year I'll be able to sell my 5S for about $200.

So it comes out to $4.17 more per month I paid than you.

 

To me the $4 extra I pay a month for an iPhone is well worth it.

 

Yep, you're ahead of the curve just since you bought your phone outright. I don't understand why more folks don't. You really do end up with many more options to keep more of your own money.

 

That said, no way I'd pay $4/month to lose Tasker ;)

post #62 of 183
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

Apple could see benefits from a "Google Play Services" approach to speed updates to core services rather than waiting until an OS update is finalized.

 

Do tell us of an instance in the past two to three years where that would have been beneficial for iOS.

Quality isn't expensive... it's priceless.

Reply

Quality isn't expensive... it's priceless.

Reply
post #63 of 183
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike Eggleston View Post


Let's see here.... We have the Mac OS X, Windows 8.1, and the many distributions of Linux out there...

Except that for the most part the makers of Win and Linux aren't selling hardware. Discussing a problem without discussing a solution is pointless.
"Few things are harder to put up with than the annoyance of a good example" Mark Twain
"Just because something is deemed the law doesn't make it just" - SolipsismX
Reply
"Few things are harder to put up with than the annoyance of a good example" Mark Twain
"Just because something is deemed the law doesn't make it just" - SolipsismX
Reply
post #64 of 183
Quote:
Originally Posted by dasanman69 View Post

Does the reason really matter? A missing feature is a missing feature no matter how you look at it.

Absolutely!

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

Reply

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

Reply
post #65 of 183
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

Less secure than un-jailbroken iOS? I fully agree. That does not mean Google Android is therefore dangerously insecure.
 

 

I was reading today about a very big security hack on Android.

 

http://www.cs.ucr.edu/~zhiyunq/publications.html

 

First topic in the publication list:

 

Peeking into Your App without Actually Seeing it: UI State Inference and Novel Android Attacks [PDF]

 

One thing he mentions in the article is that in theory this hack could be done on Windows, OS X and iOS too although unproven because for one thing you need to download a malware app first. He has only demonstrated it on Android, but it can steal anything that is in the UI. So when you log in to online banking, for example, it can grab the password, etc. Basically anything that is on the screen can be stolen.

Life is too short to drink bad coffee.

Reply

Life is too short to drink bad coffee.

Reply
post #66 of 183
Quote:
Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post

Who gives a damn about their share. Androiders should be far more concerned about stuff like this: http://nyti.ms/1oZdnPE

Sounds eerily similar to a piece of iOS ransomware that was reported to target Australian iOS users and another one that used the same "FBI Porn" warning to go after Mac owners too. I'm guessing it's probably a related group responsible for this supposed Android version and like with iOS and OSX requires the user to actively install it.
http://venturebeat.com/2013/07/15/fbi-ransomware-trojan-now-tricking-mac-users-into-paying-300-fines/
http://www.tuaw.com/2014/05/27/ios-and-mac-users-in-australia-locked-out-of-their-devices-via/?ncid=rss_truncated
melior diabolus quem scies
Reply
melior diabolus quem scies
Reply
post #67 of 183
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

Which is another way of saying these newer APIs can't be used without a lot of retooling.

 

No, he's saying the exact opposite.  I agree with him...fragmentation today under 4.x is a lot better than it was 2.x.  Targeting for Jelly Bean 4.2 captures the majority of the US market and still leaves you with a fairly recent API stack to work with.

 

Apps under 5.x may require some retooling but probably not much more than iOS 7 did.

post #68 of 183
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

I was reading today about a very big security hack on Android.

http://www.cs.ucr.edu/~zhiyunq/publications.html

First topic in the publication list:

Peeking into Your App without Actually Seeing it: UI State Inference and Novel Android Attacks [PDF]

One thing he mentions in the article is that in theory this hack could be done on Windows, OS X and iOS too although unproven because for one thing you need to download a malware app first. He has only demonstrated it on Android, but it can steal anything that is in the UI. So when you log in to online banking, for example, it can grab the password, etc. Basically anything that is on the screen can be stolen.

There's a lot of bad guys out there trying their best to find their way in to our mobile devices. So far mobile OS's have been relatively secure.
melior diabolus quem scies
Reply
melior diabolus quem scies
Reply
post #69 of 183
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post
 
There's a lot of bad guys out there trying their best to find their way in to our mobile devices. So far mobile OS's have been relatively secure.

In this case the guy is a professor at UC Riverside.

Life is too short to drink bad coffee.

Reply

Life is too short to drink bad coffee.

Reply
post #70 of 183
Quote:
Originally Posted by PScooter63 View Post

Do tell us of an instance in the past two to three years where that would have been beneficial for iOS.
A Google Play Services-like feature might have helped get some of these fixes out faster. I've no idea how difficult it would be for Apple to separate core apps from the OS itself so perhaps it's a moot question.
http://macmint.com/apple-releases-ios-7-0-6-fix-ssl-bug/
melior diabolus quem scies
Reply
melior diabolus quem scies
Reply
post #71 of 183
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

In this case the guy is a professor at UC Riverside.

...and some white hats too thank goodness.
melior diabolus quem scies
Reply
melior diabolus quem scies
Reply
post #72 of 183
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

Absolutely!

How so if the the problem for both is the same (missing features) solution for both is the same (buy new hardware)?
"Few things are harder to put up with than the annoyance of a good example" Mark Twain
"Just because something is deemed the law doesn't make it just" - SolipsismX
Reply
"Few things are harder to put up with than the annoyance of a good example" Mark Twain
"Just because something is deemed the law doesn't make it just" - SolipsismX
Reply
post #73 of 183
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

That's part of the problem with pretty much everything Google does that I have to assume it's purposely done to avoid transparency. You say Google Android to refer to non-forked versions of Android but the forked version are still using Android which comes from Google. To not cal it Android is like saying Android doesn't use Linux simply because Google did their own thing with it.

This issue goes further when they do API changes but still refer to Android by a specific version number which only looks like it's done so they can claim a higher install base for a given arbitrary value to help obfuscate the amount of fragmentation they really have.

But I don't think it's all from a choice to muddle the facts, I think the other part is simply from bad planning, like with their size chart which has a lot of overlap for the various size categories.

I look at all this and think what a nightmare for developers and customers alike.

Sorry Soli. Just saw this post so I wasn't ignoring you.

I'm not really clear on what point you're trying to make. Google obviously has no control over what Amazon chooses to do with their own Android-based OS build. GOOG committed to AOSP long ago and to their credit still contribute to and maintain it even tho Amazon, Nokia and others who use it for commercial benefit aren't contributing back to it. Are you perhaps saying Google should never have open-sourced any part of the OS and blocked any efforts for others to commercially use it in any way? Or are you proposing that Google help Amazon in developing and maintaining a highly-customized and modified fork of Android that serves only Amazon's purposes? I don't think Amazon even acknowledges that their OS is Android-based, nor how much of Android remains in it.

I'm a bit confused as to what you're trying to say.
Edited by Gatorguy - 8/22/14 at 12:10pm
melior diabolus quem scies
Reply
melior diabolus quem scies
Reply
post #74 of 183

85.7 PERCENT OF ANDROID USERS ARE ON 4.0 OR UP! Nice click bait article!

post #75 of 183
Quote:
Originally Posted by RadarTheKat View Post

In which case you have fragmentation because some devices (Amazon, Chinese vendors) don't connect to Google Play, and others aren't updated even though they conceivably could be.  Which is just another dimension of fragmentation introduced in an effort to roll out security updates across a fragmented core OS that cannot be updated on many devices for either device compatibility reasons or device vendor negligence (they don;t work to offer the updates, preferring their customers to be forced to buy a new handset or tablet).  

If they don't connect to google play, then they aren't an android service counted in Googles stats
post #76 of 183
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post


Features dependent on HW in some way, not APIs.

oh so explain Siri then? Why can't an iPhone 4 or iPad 2 run Siri? Siri is a SOFTWARE that runs off of a server. It requires no new hardware to run.

post #77 of 183

THIS should be the headline.

 

"91 percent of iOS users run iOS7, while 85.7 percent of Android users run Android 4.0 or up"

post #78 of 183
Originally Posted by deepen03 View Post
...4.0 OR UP!

 

Which was released in 2011. Put in perspective, the phone Apple released in 2011 will be discontinued in three weeks, having received three years of software updates since. And where are the Android software updates?

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already fucked.

 

Reply

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already fucked.

 

Reply
post #79 of 183
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

It's not all that hard for developers. It's more of a mythical talking point anymore.
http://rustyshelf.org/2014/07/08/the-android-screen-fragmentation-myth/
http://finance.yahoo.com/news/2014-android-fragmentation-no-longer-190026012.html

Two things:

Different screen pixel density requires different assets. So to support both an iPad and an iPhone, and all it's versions you need 4 sets of assets ,one for every screen size. On Android this just gets impossibly unrealistic to do, so you instead pick the least common denominator between them. In most cases this means omitting "Retina" display versions and just pixel-doubling the assets, at the expense of the image fidelity.

To give you an idea. If you program with Unity, there's at least 3 different GPU types, 2 different pixel densities, and 2 different "aspect ratio" layouts. The Least common denominator for all devices is 4:3 or 16:9, in which any other aspect ratio is then letter boxed. But 3D graphics doesn't care about pixel density, if you have a larger screen, you can just scale up and the worst that will happen is the textures aren't fine enough to make it not look ugly, but at least it scales up. Because the device has a limited amount of RAM, you're often forced to do this anyway. The different GPU types however kills performance. PowerVR is the top of the line, Mali is the bottom. Unity projects tend to ship with a mixture of PVR and Adreno textures on Android.

That's just covering the screen issues. On iOS, they all use PowerVR, so the texture compression is not an issue, and that's why the iOS version of the very same project will be faster no matter what.

Android devices have an ugly kludge for native development and that's the Java/Dalvik parts, that make it a pain in the ass for developers to use. Read the documentation, Google doesn't want you to even use the NDK, but most developers that I'm aware of know Java is a horrible language to develop a game in (no matter what the success of Minecraft will tell you) and will go straight to the NDK. So when you see Intel touting x86 Android images, those come with a ARM to x86 binary translator, so you're still not getting native x86 performance.

Amateur developers don't even know where to begin with Android. You download all this cruft from all over the internet, including a pile of obsolete software (JDK 6 when JDK 7 is current.) iOS, you just download XCode, nothing else.
post #80 of 183
Quote:
Originally Posted by deepen03 View Post

85.7 PERCENT OF ANDROID USERS ARE ON 4.0 OR UP! Nice click bait article!

87.8% of all statistics are made up!
How to enter the Apple logo  on iOS:
/Settings/Keyboard/Shortcut and paste in  which you copied from an email draft or a note. Screendump
Reply
How to enter the Apple logo  on iOS:
/Settings/Keyboard/Shortcut and paste in  which you copied from an email draft or a note. Screendump
Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: iPhone
  • While 91% of Apple users run iOS 7, five different versions of Android hold 10%+ share
AppleInsider › Forums › Mobile › iPhone › While 91% of Apple users run iOS 7, five different versions of Android hold 10%+ share