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Apple's 12-inch Retina MacBook Air given vague 15-month launch window by DigiTimes

post #1 of 39
Thread Starter 
The latest rumor on Apple's anticipated redesign of the MacBook Air casts a particularly wide net, suggesting that a thinner model could launch either this fall, or it could miss the holiday shopping season and debut at some point in 2015.




The alleged details, attributed to Taiwan-based supply chain makers, were reported on Wednesday by DigiTimes, which is known for an unreliable track record in predicting Apple's future product plans. The sources that spoke with the publication expressed uncertainty about the launch window for the new MacBook Air, saying Apple plans to launch the thinner model "possibly at the end of 2014 or in 2015," not even narrowing down a potential timeframe for next year.

With what is essentially a 15-month launch window, the rumor leaves considerable room for error. Wednesday's report also claimed that production of components for the new notebook has begun in "small volumes."

No other details on the device were included, and the report did not make note of the anticipated addition of a 12-inch Retina display. To date, rumors have consistently pegged the new MacBook Air as having an even thinner design and a high-resolution Retina display in the 12-inch range.

Apple's next-generation ultra-portable notebook has also been rumored to sport a fan-less quiet design --?something that could be possible with Intel's next-generation Broadwell chips. The first Broadwell chips, intended for ultra-low-power notebooks, are scheduled to arrive in limited quantities beginning this fall, before a wider launch of the platform in 2015.

Finally, Wednesday's report also claims that Apple's legacy 13.3-inch MacBook Pro with CD/DVD SuperDrive is "expected to be retired by the end of 2014," or just four months from now. The notebook currently remains a part of Apple's notebook lineup, and was given a $100 price cut in July when the Retina display models were updated with newer chips.
post #2 of 39
Unusual for DigiTimes to be vague, their wild guesses are usually pretty specific. 1wink.gif
From Apple ][ - to new Mac Pro I've used them all.
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From Apple ][ - to new Mac Pro I've used them all.
Long on AAPL so biased
Google Motto "You're not the customer. You're the product."
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post #3 of 39
This is one overhyped machine. At the end of the day it will still be a vastly underpowered Mac for doing any real work on OS X.
post #4 of 39
Apple's designers seem to be confusing laptops with bread knives. I could care less about a thinner MacBook Air. In a case, it'll be protected by the same necessarily thick layers of foam as my current MacBook, and thus just as bulky. On a desk, a small difference in thickness matters not. I'm not writing while locked like Houdini in a suitcase barely larger than I am. The universe is huge. I have lots of room.

I remember well how this absurd obsession with thinness began. It started with a Motorola phone called the RAZR, which was quite the rage for a time. I even had one and, while it was pretty, I loathed it. The UI was so-so and the developers were so clueless, it did not even include a simple note-taking feature. An obsession about one detail, thinness, can mean failure elsewhere. The RAZR fad faded into nothing.

The time and effort to creating absurd levels of thinness distracts from what the next MacBook Air really needs. In addition to the obvious (a Retina screen), that includes:

1. A really compact and light-weight power supply built like the Finsix "Dart." It's ridiculous to have a featherweight laptop that uses a chunky white brick for power. And while Apple is creating that new power supply, why not build a USB power connector into it, so users can charge their iPhones and iPads without pulling out their laptop?

2. A MagSafe-like replacement for what is by far the worst connector in computerdom, that giant, ugly, clumsy ethernet connector left over from thirty years ago. WiFi is not suitable for every location or for fields where privacy matters like banking, law, and medicine. Doing that would win the praise of the world.

3. Touch ID for the power button. Power-on and log-in with one quick motion would be a great timesaver.

4. GPS location sharing. Make it possible for one GPS-equipped Apple device, say an iPhone, to share its location with other devices via Bluetooth, say an iPad or MBA. That'd make location services far more useful.

Those four improvements would do more to make MBAs sell like hotcakes than a few millimeters of reduction in its thickness.
post #5 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by pmz View Post

This is one overhyped machine. At the end of the day it will still be a vastly underpowered Mac for doing any real work on OS X.
Overhyped machine by who? We don't even know that this (or the rumored 12.9" iPad) exist. Of course rumor sites starved for Apple news will report on this because they need something to fill their pages and generate ad revenue.
post #6 of 39
You hit the bullseye there. Any computer with a power profile to be fanless won't be a Mac with the expected performance profile. Essentially yo end up with a single tasking machine. This is why I often wonder if these rumors are really about an IOS based device.

My experience with iPad tells me that iOS and the associated hardware can deliver a nice "laptop" experience if the expectations are low. Low in this case meaning single tasking interface for the most part. It wouldn't be suitable for current Mac uses though. Atleast not someone that runs several substantial apps at the same time.

In the end I don't see Broadwell delivering the performance per watt to even replace today's Air models in a fan less machine.
Quote:
Originally Posted by pmz View Post

This is one overhyped machine. At the end of the day it will still be a vastly underpowered Mac for doing any real work on OS X.

Edited by wizard69 - 8/27/14 at 4:33pm
post #7 of 39
The 13" MBA is the best laptop Apple's ever made IMO. Pretty much perfect as is.
post #8 of 39
DigiTimes doesn't guess at anything. Read the publication a bit and you will find that this is just information that comes their way that they publish. Usually reserved for column space that might be seen as a rumor or gossip column. It is American publications like Appleinsider that try to elevate some of these articles to the status of researched news.
Quote:
Originally Posted by digitalclips View Post

Unusual for DigiTimes to be vague, their wild guesses are usually pretty specific. 1wink.gif
post #9 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by pmz View Post

This is one overhyped machine. At the end of the day it will still be a vastly underpowered Mac for doing any real work on OS X.

Define "real work". Are you assuming everyone is running 3D render farms at home?

Help! I'm trapped in a white dungeon of amazing precision and impeccable tolerances!

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post #10 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by paxman View Post

The 13" MBA is the best laptop Apple's ever made IMO. Pretty much perfect as is.

It depends upon your expectations. For years I wouldn't even consider an Air due to the rather pathetic performance. Airs have gotten much better no doubt there. I'd be very tempted by a Broadwell powered machine, that is if Broadwell actually delivers on the hype. Beyond that I'm still wanting a quad core which I doubt will make it into Air with the next rev.

The thing is this, I keep my machines for a very long time compared to some. Buying too low on the performance curve leads to frustrating performance in the up grade cycle. An Air today may run Yosemite OK and even a couple of apps but what another three years from now? It can make one a sad puppy when a software upgrade effectively grinds your machine to a halt. By the way these software related usability issues are often RAM related, more RAM is a life extender too. It is too bad Airs don't have an even bigger build to order option for RAM
post #11 of 39
Real work is running several apps at the same time. I can easily chock a machine by running XCode, Safari and ITunes at the same time. Part of that is RAM related which Air class machines do not address well but part of the issue is also raw processor performance. Sometimes you just need more cores or clock speed. This isn't render farm work but rather normal operation for some users.

The problem with this rumored fanless design is that the rumored Abroadwrll chips suitable for such a machine might be of the "tablet" class. That is to keep the power low they cut clock rate significantly and trim other featured that burn power. Let's face it you can only down clock Sao far before performance becomes an issue. All of this is a reasonable concern because we don't know exactly what Intel will deliver. A fan less Air could very well be underpowered compare to even today's Airs.
Quote:
Originally Posted by GadgetCanadaV2 View Post

Define "real work". Are you assuming everyone is running 3D render farms at home?
post #12 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by wizard69 View Post
It depends upon your expectations. For years I wouldn't even consider an Air due to the rather pathetic performance. Airs have gotten much better no doubt there. I'd be very tempted by a Broadwell powered machine, that is if Broadwell actually delivers on the hype. Beyond that I'm still wanting a quad core which I doubt will make it into Air with the next rev.

The thing is this, I keep my machines for a very long time compared to some. Buying too low on the performance curve leads to frustrating performance in the up grade cycle. An Air today may run Yosemite OK and even a couple of apps but what another three years from now? It can make one a sad puppy when a software upgrade effectively grinds your machine to a halt. By the way these software related usability issues are often RAM related, more RAM is a life extender too. It is too bad Airs don't have an even bigger build to order option for RAM

Sure, there are a number of circumstances that would render the mba less than ideal, but on balance it is a machine hard to beat. For day to day computing the mba is plenty fast and maxed out it is plenty powerful. If you are a pro user (in a broad sense) of graphics and video software for instance, it would not be ideal as your primary machine, obviously. 

post #13 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by wizard69 View Post
Real work is running several apps at the same time. I can easily chock a machine by running XCode, Safari and ITunes at the same time. Part of that is RAM related which Air class machines do not address well but part of the issue is also raw processor performance. Sometimes you just need more cores or clock speed. This isn't render farm work but rather normal operation for some users.

I am not even sure why you are looking at laptops as there are so many limitations by their very nature. If you always require lots of power and you are always on the move there is only one machine for you in the Apple family and that is a maxed out MBP, period.

post #14 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by wizard69 View Post

Any computer with a power profile to be fanless won't be a Mac with the expected performance profile. Essentially you end up with a single tasking machine.

In the end I don't see Broadwell delivering the performance per watt to even replace today's Air models in a fan less machine.

Haswell already delivers a usable fanless design:

http://browser.primatelabs.com/geekbench3/compare/392973?baseline=190269

This is slower than the current Air but only slightly. The Air isn't meant to be a powerhouse machine and the 13" MBP isn't a powerhouse either at only 30% or so faster than the Air.

They could easily replace the Air and 13" MBP with a fanless Broadwell design that maintains the current Air performance and adds a Retina display.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Inkling 
1. A really compact and light-weight power supply built like the Finsix "Dart." It's ridiculous to have a featherweight laptop that uses a chunky white brick for power. And while Apple is creating that new power supply, why not build a USB power connector into it, so users can charge their iPhones and iPads without pulling out their laptop?

The USB port is a good idea and smaller PSUs would be nice but they have to work internationally so the plugs would add some bulk. I wouldn't say Apple's power adaptors are all that big, the ones with similar power ratings are only twice the size of the 65W finsix, the MBP 85W adaptor is larger but a higher power rating:



Still, it's clearly an improvement so if they can design a smaller one, they should. There may be reliability issues that crop with the method they used, which is fine when dealing with a few thousand units:

http://finsix.com/power-platform/

They make a magsafe version so people can always buy one directly from them. It looks like the company secured $2.2m in funding:

http://www.xconomy.com/boston/2014/08/19/finsix-garners-2260000-new-round/
Quote:
Originally Posted by Inkling 
2. A MagSafe-like replacement for what is by far the worst connector in computerdom, that giant, ugly, clumsy ethernet connector left over from thirty years ago. WiFi is not suitable for every location or for fields where privacy matters like banking, law, and medicine. Doing that would win the praise of the world.

Ethernet isn't used enough to be worth making a dedicated port for, you get USB and Thunderbolt adaptors for it. If the USB designers want to add networking capability over the protocol, there's nothing stopping them. There's IP over Thunderbolt. It wouldn't necessarily change the networking hardware though, which is what holds it back.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Inkling 
3. Touch ID for the power button. Power-on and log-in with one quick motion would be a great timesaver.

Having a fingerprint login for FileVault would be nice, it could even save typing in the password in the command-line and encrypted external drives can be mounted with it too.
post #15 of 39

The A7 is a powerful chip, so we are told.  The A8 will be more powerful.  The 12" iPad, could come with an A9.  Who knows was iOS10 will be capable of in another year.  Dismissing it now is short-sighted.  Apple doesn't release products for niche markets.  They create markets that didn't exist.

 

I still think Apple is working towards an ARM-Based notebook of some kind, whether it runs OSX or iOS is yet to be seen.

post #16 of 39
"Just you wait,
Sandy Bridge
Ivy Bridge
Haswell
Broadwell
will change everything!"

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
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"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

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post #17 of 39
Apple should make a MacBook Air that can be charged via USB cable. Then no more MagSafe ports would be needed. And you could simply plug your MacBook Air into a MacBook Pro to charge it. Also, /s

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
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"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

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post #18 of 39

What a useless prediction. "This product that Apple will obviously make at some point is coming sometime in the next year and a half. LOOK GUYS WE HAVE CONNECTIONS SEE HOW ACCURATE OUR PREDICTIONS ARE!"

post #19 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by Eriamjh View Post
 

The A7 is a powerful chip, so we are told.  The A8 will be more powerful.  The 12" iPad, could come with an A9.  Who knows was iOS10 will be capable of in another year.  Dismissing it now is short-sighted.  Apple doesn't release products for niche markets.  They create markets that didn't exist.

 

I still think Apple is working towards an ARM-Based notebook of some kind, whether it runs OSX or iOS is yet to be seen.

ARM based notebook running iOS would be awesome!  But... 12'' iPad rumor would be meaningless. But.. still... 12'' iPad with iOS and add-on keyboard might be this ARM based notebook.  Cant wait for Apple doing awesome things.  But wait.. Chromebooks.......

post #20 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by pmz View Post

This is one overhyped machine. At the end of the day it will still be a vastly underpowered Mac for doing any real work on OS X.

 

What's your definition of "real work"? And does whatever not fall into those very specific use cases considered "fake" work?

 

A multicore A8 chip with a good amount of RAM could probably handle almost everything your average would throw at it, with ease. No, it won't be the best machine for heavy duty rendering/etc, but that doesn't mean it does not deserve to exist. I do think there's a place for something between an iPad and a Macbook, that leverages the simplicity and useability of iOS and the appstore, along with a larger screen. 

post #21 of 39

This is an underrated post.   

Also love the Dvorak quote.   What a visionary. 

post #22 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by Slurpy View Post
 

What's your definition of "real work"? And does whatever not fall into those very specific use cases considered "fake" work?

 

Well, clearly most of my work is fake. I have suspected this for many years now and dread the day I am found out. That's why I have a packed suitcase by my front door. When someone rings the door and tells me I've been found out I can just grab it and go.

post #23 of 39
I'm struggling to identify the use cases for a larger iPad than the current iPad Air, unless of course it is a convertible. With the MB Air and MB Pro getting so close, especially if they slap a retina display on the Air, maybe the next generation Air will be a convertible to drive greater differentiation between the two product lines. Think about a 12" MB Air with retina touch screen that optionally detaches. If they keep the keyboard and trackpad quality as great as it currently is on the Air line I think it will crush the floppy keyboard Surface even further into its dark hole. Being a convertible does not mean the keyboard and trackpad have to suck.

Regarding "real" work, I've yet to find a laptop or notebook that provides a really good experience for doing software development (XCode, Visual Studio, Eclipse, etc.) without a seriously large external monitor or two and access to big storage. Sure you can use it without external augmentation in a crunch, but it's like living in a one room efficiency apartment with a fold out couch, four kids, and two dogs. You won't die but you'll be half crazy in no time at all.
post #24 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by DewMe View Post

I'm struggling to identify the use cases for a larger iPad than the current iPad Air

Any kind of drawing and graphics related work (creation). Any kind of audio visual post production work where touch is of benefit and a larger display is required. Architectural and technical drawing work. And I can imagine there are many uses where a larger mainly stationary touch screen would be applicable. 

 

Who knows what kind of peripherals would work with such a device but I'd imagine more than your standard iPad.

post #25 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by pmz View Post

This is one overhyped machine. At the end of the day it will still be a vastly underpowered Mac for doing any real work on OS X.

Well if this was a ploy to lure everyone in to comment on it seems to have worked. Not sure what you mean by real work, as I seem to remember doing real work on my first Titanium 500 which contained a CPU that is no where near as powerful as the slowest ARM cpu that Apple sells in their iPads today. Overhyped, by who, you, certainly not anyone here, yeah sure, we all want a 12" MacBook Air Retina, but I mean it's kind of overdue don't you think, pretty much every notebook on sale today in the same price bracket has at least a 1080P display, heck, even 380 dollar ChromeBooks have 1080P displays now, so this is just a logical next step, overhyped no, anticipated, overdue, borderline shameful, absolutely.

When I looked up "Ninjas" in Thesaurus.com, it said "Ninja's can't be found" Well played Ninjas, well played.
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post #26 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by DewMe View Post

Regarding "real" work, I've yet to find a laptop or notebook that provides a really good experience for doing software development (XCode, Visual Studio, Eclipse, etc.) without a seriously large external monitor or two and access to big storage. Sure you can use it without external augmentation in a crunch, but it's like living in a one room efficiency apartment with a fold out couch, four kids, and two dogs. You won't die but you'll be half crazy in no time at all.

Really, wow, I can write pretty much any program using just VI and a 10" tablet display. I've even written 1200 lines of code using nothing but a Nokia N950 during a 12 hour layover in Tokyo. I hate writing code on huge monitors, though I don't need a visual stunning IDE, I do it in my head, not bragging here as I'm not alone, every single decent programmer I know uses either a MacBook or a Lenovo ThinkPad that is 14" or less, the Air and X series being the favorites.

When I looked up "Ninjas" in Thesaurus.com, it said "Ninja's can't be found" Well played Ninjas, well played.
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post #27 of 39

Ahhh... DT.

You did not come into the world to fail. You came into the world to succeed.

- Gordon Hinckley

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You did not come into the world to fail. You came into the world to succeed.

- Gordon Hinckley

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post #28 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chandra69 View Post

ARM based notebook running iOS would be awesome!  But... 12'' iPad rumor would be meaningless. But.. still... 12'' iPad with iOS and add-on keyboard might be this ARM based notebook.  Cant wait for Apple doing awesome things.  But wait.. Chromebooks.......

Running iOS apps would be cool but it would need more of an iOS to be useful to me. The problem right now is that I use my iPad and MBP in two different ways. As such an iOS based laptop wouldn't replace my MBP and thus wouldn't have a valid reason to exist. At least for me.

Give me an ARM based laptop though that has the flexibility of Mac OS based machine but can run iOS apps well and I might have a different opinion. The big issue for me is the freedom to use the USB ports as I please and to have easily installed drivers that can support a variety of external software.
post #29 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by DewMe View Post

I'm struggling to identify the use cases for a larger iPad than the current iPad Air, unless of course it is a convertible. With the MB Air and MB Pro getting so close, especially if they slap a retina display on the Air, maybe the next generation Air will be a convertible to drive greater differentiation between the two product lines.
The problem here is that the machines aren't close in performance and frankly the screen means very little. Remember people purchased the old MBP in droves even if retina wasn't a known quantity. MBP get purchased for their professional qualities, including performance.
Quote:
Think about a 12" MB Air with retina touch screen that optionally detaches. If they keep the keyboard and trackpad quality as great as it currently is on the Air line I think it will crush the floppy keyboard Surface even further into its dark hole. Being a convertible does not mean the keyboard and trackpad have to suck.

Regarding "real" work, I've yet to find a laptop or notebook that provides a really good experience for doing software development (XCode, Visual Studio, Eclipse, etc.) without a seriously large external monitor or two and access to big storage.
Screen size is a factor but remember external screens are well supported in Mac OS.
Quote:
Sure you can use it without external augmentation in a crunch, but it's like living in a one room efficiency apartment with a fold out couch, four kids, and two dogs. You won't die but you'll be half crazy in no time at all.
The problem here is that software, especially Xcode, has become more demanding of hardware over the years. You will always end up within crowded feeling if your hardware is on the old side.
post #30 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by DewMe View Post

I'm struggling to identify the use cases for a larger iPad than the current iPad Air, unless of course it is a convertible.

Musicians
post #31 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by iRun262 View Post

Musicians
Photographers
Artists
post #32 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by wizard69 View Post


Running iOS apps would be cool but it would need more of an iOS to be useful to me. The problem right now is that I use my iPad and MBP in two different ways. As such an iOS based laptop wouldn't replace my MBP and thus wouldn't have a valid reason to exist. At least for me.

Give me an ARM based laptop though that has the flexibility of Mac OS based machine but can run iOS apps well and I might have a different opinion. The big issue for me is the freedom to use the USB ports as I please and to have easily installed drivers that can support a variety of external software.

....and have the ability to run more apps in the background, better communication between apps especially music creation, built in file-manager, more memory, etc. There is actually a very big list of things that needs to be done to iOS before I would even consider using it as my default OS, basically it needs to be OSX with a touch friendly interface. Until such time my iPad will always be just a tool amongst the many that I use, a good tool but never my primary.

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post #33 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by Relic View Post

....and have the ability to run more apps in the background, better communication between apps especially music creation, built in file-manager, more memory, etc.
IOS and the devices it runs on, will advance anyways. At the very least I'd expect to see more RAM and expanding multitasking capabilities with iPad hardware this year.

Things like file manager access is why I'd want a Mac OS derived operating system. It would be a snap for Apple to support tablet apps on an ARM based laptop.
Quote:
There is actually a very big list of things that needs to be done to iOS before I would even consider using it as my default OS, basically it needs to be OSX with a touch friendly interface.
That is basically what I'm asking for. Touch would be taken care of initially via iOS apps running in a separate environment.
Quote:
Until such time my iPad will always be just a tool amongst the many that I use, a good tool but never my primary.
I do find iPad a bit frustrating as it could be far more useful. However I do like it far more for things like logging into Appleinsider and other web related activities.
post #34 of 39

Real work is using more than 1 App at a time.

Real work often means having 10-12 Apps open in the background to switch between.

Real work implies Safari and Mail both running smoothly.

Real work implies CREATING a file. Be it a keynote, PDF, video or audio file.

 

All of the above I find Apple's slower machines (looking at you, MBA) to suck at. If you want a machine that is not constantly handicapped by a small amount of RAM, and very low clock speed, do not get a MacBook Air.

 

The 13" Retina MacBook Pro with 8 GB of RAM and up is the bare minimum machine for real work. 

post #35 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by pmz View Post

All of the above I find Apple's slower machines (looking at you, MBA) to suck at. If you want a machine that is not constantly handicapped by a small amount of RAM, and very low clock speed, do not get a MacBook Air.

The 13" Retina MacBook Pro with 8 GB of RAM and up is the bare minimum machine for real work.

The 13" Air with the $100 8GB RAM upgrade is close to the MBP. The clock speed is irrelevant as they dynamically overclock. The raw performance is here:

http://browser.primatelabs.com/mac-benchmarks

The MBP is 6620, the Air is 5304, just under 25% faster, the GPU is about the same increase, which you wouldn't notice. The Retina display is better but performance-wise, you wouldn't tell the difference side by side.
post #36 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by pmz View Post

Real work is using more than 1 App at a time.
With those apps actually doing something.
Quote:
Real work often means having 10-12 Apps open in the background to switch between.
Real work implies Safari and Mail both running smoothly.
At the same time too.
Quote:
Real work implies CREATING a file. Be it a keynote, PDF, video or audio file.
Or processing data which often leads to a new file. It is often surprising to find out how much actual creation happens on people's PC's. Often nothing is created, thus anniPad can be a perfect fit for these people.
Quote:
All of the above I find Apple's slower machines (looking at you, MBA) to suck at. If you want a machine that is not constantly handicapped by a small amount of RAM, and very low clock speed, do not get a MacBook Air.
The lack of cores is also a significant issue.
Quote:
The 13" Retina MacBook Pro with 8 GB of RAM and up is the bare minimum machine for real work. 

It isn't a bad machine that is for certain. I just don't think a lot of people grasp how big the gap in performance is between the MBA and just about all other Apple products. The Air's get better with each Intel release but the nature of the machine means that they will always trail the other Apple hardware.
post #37 of 39
Marvin, this is very misleading and I think you missed the point the original poster was trying to make. That is that the Air suffers significantly under any professional usage profiles.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marvin View Post

The 13" Air with the $100 8GB RAM upgrade is close to the MBP. The clock speed is irrelevant as they dynamically overclock. The raw performance is here:
The benchmarks don't really mean a lot in this context. What is important is how the machine behaves when heavily loaded. In fact there are situations where even a power user can impact machine performance doing minor things at the same time. For a power suer it is easy to bring these machines to a crawl.
Quote:

The MBP is 6620, the Air is 5304, just under 25% faster, the GPU is about the same increase, which you wouldn't notice. The Retina display is better but performance-wise, you wouldn't tell the difference side by side.

So? Really it is how the machine runs when you have multiple processes vying for processor time that counts for many pro users.
post #38 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by wizard69 View Post

Marvin, this is very misleading and I think you missed the point the original poster was trying to make. That is that the Air suffers significantly under any professional usage profiles.

That's what some people like to believe but it's not true with newer models.
Quote:
Originally Posted by wizard69 View Post

In fact there are situations where even a power user can impact machine performance doing minor things at the same time. For a power suer it is easy to bring these machines to a crawl.

Not for the Air any more so than the 13" rMBP. The 15" rMBP is significantly more powerful but the Air and 13" rMBP are very close.
Quote:
Originally Posted by wizard69 View Post

So? Really it is how the machine runs when you have multiple processes vying for processor time that counts for many pro users.

The Air CPU is 2-core / 4-thread, same as the 13" rMBP:

Air CPU (up to 2.7GHz):
http://ark.intel.com/products/75030/Intel-Core-i5-4260U-Processor-3M-Cache-up-to-2_70-GHz
13" rMBP CPU (up to 3.1GHz):
http://ark.intel.com/products/83508/Intel-Core-i5-4278U-Processor-3M-Cache-up-to-3_10-GHz
post #39 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by wizard69 View Post

It isn't a bad machine that is for certain. I just don't think a lot of people grasp how big the gap in performance is between the MBA and just about all other Apple products. The Air's get better with each Intel release but the nature of the machine means that they will always trail the other Apple hardware.

 

Sure but that's okay though, for it's intended purpose, price point and most importantly size. When matched with the I7-4650U and 8GB the MacBook Air is no slouch by any means. It's a sub-notebook, not much wiggle room when it comes to CPU's, especially when power concerns and limited space to dissipate heat is such a big factor. Did you have a specific CPU in mind as a possible replacement. Because I have to tell you, after studying Intel's current lineup it looks like Apple is using the fastest possible CPU that they could successfully pull off in such a tiny platform. If you look at the competitions series of sub-notebooks, Asus ZenBook, HP EliteBook, Lenovo ThinkPad X, Samsung Ativ, Dell XPS, their all using the same exact chips. As power users we care about such things but lets get realistic, the majority of people who buy the Air and 13" MacBook aren't looking for the fastest machines possible, most likely they are budget minded individuals or business people who travel. Someone like you would most defiantly be served better with purchasing a MacBook Pro 15". I would like to see the MacBook Air get a higher resolution, now that is defiantly something where the line is falling short.

When I looked up "Ninjas" in Thesaurus.com, it said "Ninja's can't be found" Well played Ninjas, well played.
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When I looked up "Ninjas" in Thesaurus.com, it said "Ninja's can't be found" Well played Ninjas, well played.
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