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Apple reportedly inks deal with American Express for 'iPhone 6' payment system - Page 2

post #41 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by Slurpy View Post
 

 

The Google barge doesnt exist anymore, its been sold for scrap, after fullfilling its sole mission of creating thousands of "OMG WHAT IS INSIDE THIS INNOVATIVE GOOGLE BARGE" hype articles on tech blogs. Another one of Google's ill thought out "we dont know where the **** we're going with this, but lets do it anyway" initiatives created to keep their name in the news. 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Apple ][ View Post
 

 

What Google barge?

 

The barge has been sold and the four-story structure will be dismantled, along with Portland’s hope for a new claim to fame.

 

Don't worry. The tech pundits applaud the Google barge as innovative and Google has won points for trying to disrupt the status quo in retail. And they're going to give Google a "most innovative company of 2014" award for it. And techies will clamor for Apple to keep up.


Edited by Suddenly Newton - 8/31/14 at 2:57pm

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
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"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
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post #42 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by leavingthebigG View Post
 

NFC. NFC. NFC. The NFC mantra for the upcoming iPhone is similar to last year's NFC mantra for the iPhone 5S.

 

Apple showed that iBeacons was the direction it was going in and the NFC mantra faded away.

 

With with over 500 million-plus iPhone/iPad/iPhone Mini (my guess) users who are tied to iTunes and who can install iOS 8 the day the new operating system is released, I question why Apple would choose to drop ALL of those customers in favor of NFC instead of iBeacons.

 

People can point to NFC patents Apple has submitted and/or have been approved, but they can also point to similar iBeacons patents like these...

 

http://www.patentlyapple.com/patently-apple/2014/07/fcc-documents-surface-revealing-apples-ibeacon-testing.html#more

http://www.patentlyapple.com/patently-apple/2014/01/apple-patent-reveals-secure-iwallet-system-with-ibeacon.html

http://www.patentlyapple.com/patently-apple/2013/11/apple-files-four-trademark-applications-for-ibeacon-supporting-future-iwallet-services.html

 

And, here is something very interesting about iOS vs Android concerning iBeacons...

 

http://www.patentlyapple.com/patently-apple/2014/04/when-it-comes-to-ibeacon-readiness-ios-7-idevices-score-87-vs-android-devices-at-a-paltry-25.html#more

 

For some reason analysts are fixated on NFC just like there have been fixated on a full-fledged television and a smart watch! As has been stated above multiple times, Android has had NFC for years and the technology has gone nowhere fast. IF Apple were to adopt NFC, the technology would finally be legitimized due to Apple being able to do something Google has been unsuccessful at doing for three-four-five years now!

 

Samsung, the so-called TRUE Android competitor to Apple, tried to make NFC successful with NFC tags. That effort, like other Samsung efforts, went nowhere fast. No matter how much Android fans might protest this failure, all they have to do is read their Web sites to see how many articles have been written THIS year about NFC tags vs iBeacons. If NFC was so good why has every Android Wear manufacturer chosen NOT to include an NFC chip in their smart watches? If Apple included an NFC chip in its rumored smart watch (or wearable -- analysts have recently begun hedging their bets on this), every Android Wear manufacturer would start including an NFC chip in their smart watches as fast as possible.

 

With iBeacons technology being deployed all over the world for shopping, sports and more, the technology provides Apple a unique opportunity to implement an e-payments solution tied to iTunes that cannot be easily copied by Google and its Android partners. What makes this even more interesting is many Android smartphone users have iPads and because of this they may get to use Apple's e-payments solution.

 

No matter my thoughts on this subject, Apple may answer many questions on Tuesday, September 9, 2014.

 

So, I'm not questioning your view, per se, but I'm trying to understand how iBeacons could in any way be a substitute for a payment system?  It seems that they are highly divergent, yet very complimentary, technologies.  If anything, the advent of iBeacons would seem to me to be an excellent pointer towards a payment system.  What could be better from a revenue perspective: iBeacons delivering relevant, targeted pricing and advertising information to the consumer, with instant ability to purchase... all with revenue gains for Apple.

 

I'm not saying such a thing will happen, and to be honest it makes me feel a little dirty just bringing it up.  But when you bring forth a device like an iWatch (should it come into existence) and then you add NFC and iBeacons into the picture... you get a very instantly accessible payment and advertising system that I think retailers and payment networks would be very eager to be a part of.

 

Again, I am not suggesting this will happen... but it looks a bit like a 'no brainer' to me.  And as a matter of fact, I think such a system is mostly inevitable.

post #43 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post
 

All Apple has to do is siphon off the credit card companies business and eventually offer their own Apple-branded credit card on the iPhone. Cut out the middlemen and you'll instantly have the worlds biggest credit company. American Express has a market cap of less than $94 billion.

 

Ha! That's exactly what I thought Apple would do with the "cellular companies" back when the iPhone first came out and all that cellular spectrum went to auction.

 

I'm still waiting for "Appletel" or "iCellular" someday. 

post #44 of 95

I don't know the credibility of this website, but it reports that the Big Three are supposedly on board with Apple for mobile payments:

 

http://www.dailytech.com/Reports+Apple+Has+Signed+on+American+Express+Visa+MasterCard+for+Mobile+Payments/article36480.htm

 

The pieces are falling into place...

post #45 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by leavingthebigG View Post

NFC. NFC. NFC. The NFC mantra for the upcoming iPhone is similar to last year's NFC mantra for the iPhone 5S.

Apple showed that iBeacons was the direction it was going in and the NFC mantra faded away.

With with over 500 million-plus iPhone/iPad/iPhone Mini (my guess) users who are tied to iTunes and who can install iOS 8 the day the new operating system is released, I question why Apple would choose to drop ALL of those customers in favor of NFC instead of iBeacons.

People can point to NFC patents Apple has submitted and/or have been approved, but they can also point to similar iBeacons patents like these...

http://www.patentlyapple.com/patently-apple/2014/07/fcc-documents-surface-revealing-apples-ibeacon-testing.html#more
http://www.patentlyapple.com/patently-apple/2014/01/apple-patent-reveals-secure-iwallet-system-with-ibeacon.html

http://www.patentlyapple.com/patently-apple/2013/11/apple-files-four-trademark-applications-for-ibeacon-supporting-future-iwallet-services.html

And, here is something very interesting about iOS vs Android concerning iBeacons...

http://www.patentlyapple.com/patently-apple/2014/04/when-it-comes-to-ibeacon-readiness-ios-7-idevices-score-87-vs-android-devices-at-a-paltry-25.html#more

For some reason analysts are fixated on NFC just like there have been fixated on a full-fledged television and a smart watch! As has been stated above multiple times, Android has had NFC for years and the technology has gone nowhere fast. IF Apple were to adopt NFC, the technology would finally be legitimized due to Apple being able to do something Google has been unsuccessful at doing for three-four-five years now!

Samsung, the so-called TRUE Android competitor to Apple, tried to make NFC successful with NFC tags. That effort, like other Samsung efforts, went nowhere fast. No matter how much Android fans might protest this failure, all they have to do is read their Web sites to see how many articles have been written THIS year about NFC tags vs iBeacons. If NFC was so good why has every Android Wear manufacturer chosen NOT to include an NFC chip in their smart watches? If Apple included an NFC chip in its rumored smart watch (or wearable -- analysts have recently begun hedging their bets on this), every Android Wear manufacturer would start including an NFC chip in their smart watches as fast as possible.

With iBeacons technology being deployed all over the world for shopping, sports and more, the technology provides Apple a unique opportunity to implement an e-payments solution tied to iTunes that cannot be easily copied by Google and its Android partners. What makes this even more interesting is many Android smartphone users have iPads and because of this they may get to use Apple's e-payments solution.

No matter my thoughts on this subject, Apple may answer many questions on Tuesday, September 9, 2014.


I am not convinced that Apple is including NFC on iPhone 6 despite the evidence. Most of the iPhone 6 hardware leaks are from a single, essentially unknown source.
post #46 of 95
So how does Apple make money on this? are the payments just a killer app to sell more iPhones? I have a hard time believing that the CC companies would give Apple a slice of the pie, unless Apple can convince them that the payments are so much more secure that their cost s will decrease.
post #47 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by leavingthebigG View Post

NFC. NFC. NFC. The NFC mantra for the upcoming iPhone is similar to last year's NFC mantra for the iPhone 5S.

Apple showed that iBeacons was the direction it was going in and the NFC mantra faded away.

With with over 500 million-plus iPhone/iPad/iPhone Mini (my guess) users who are tied to iTunes and who can install iOS 8 the day the new operating system is released, I question why Apple would choose to drop ALL of those customers in favor of NFC instead of iBeacons.

People can point to NFC patents Apple has submitted and/or have been approved, but they can also point to similar iBeacons patents like these...

For some reason analysts are fixated on NFC just like there have been fixated on a full-fledged television and a smart watch! As has been stated above multiple times, Android has had NFC for years and the technology has gone nowhere fast. IF Apple were to adopt NFC, the technology would finally be legitimized due to Apple being able to do something Google has been unsuccessful at doing for three-four-five years now!

Samsung, the so-called TRUE Android competitor to Apple, tried to make NFC successful with NFC tags. That effort, like other Samsung efforts, went nowhere fast. No matter how much Android fans might protest this failure, all they have to do is read their Web sites to see how many articles have been written THIS year about NFC tags vs iBeacons. If NFC was so good why has every Android Wear manufacturer chosen NOT to include an NFC chip in their smart watches? If Apple included an NFC chip in its rumored smart watch (or wearable -- analysts have recently begun hedging their bets on this), every Android Wear manufacturer would start including an NFC chip in their smart watches as fast as possible.

With iBeacons technology being deployed all over the world for shopping, sports and more, the technology provides Apple a unique opportunity to implement an e-payments solution tied to iTunes that cannot be easily copied by Google and its Android partners. What makes this even more interesting is many Android smartphone users have iPads and because of this they may get to use Apple's e-payments solution.

I agree. NFC is over hyped, not secure enough, and just a gimmick so far to say you have it. Bumping phones to share pictures is a lot different than making secure payments.

I really doubt that the credit card companies are on-board based only on the iPhone 6 base. IMO iBeacon will be used. However the use of a secure enclave will be important. The iPhone 5s has such an area for fingerprint security. Whether it has the capacity for that additional function I don't know but the user base is large as will be the iPhone 6. The analysts can stop drooling about NFC on 9/9 and try and figure out how Google and their puppet Samsung screwed up on this one.
Edited by mnbob1 - 8/31/14 at 4:00pm
post #48 of 95
I think the real news is that American Express is headquartered in Buffalo. I'm not sure that's been true since 1850.
post #49 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carson O'Genic View Post

So how does Apple make money on this? are the payments just a killer app to sell more iPhones? I have a hard time believing that the CC companies would give Apple a slice of the pie, unless Apple can convince them that the payments are so much more secure that their cost s will decrease.

 

If Apple is facilitating the "float" then they would be taking on the risk of acting as middleman, but they'd also be disintermediating the banks and eventually the credit card companies themselves, after consumers realize they don't need a credit card at all.

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post #50 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by formosa View Post
 

 

Thanks, that's interesting info to me. Sounds like the physical card may be completely unnecessary by the method you describe.

The card never was necessary. just proof of 'trust' by the issuing bank. 

It used to be 'knowledge' of your bank account number and your signature was enough (check).

Diners club was a cardboard card originally.  No raised numbers.... that was a request of the retailers to avoid transcription errors.

 

you can still transact with just the number and the exp date, and CVV, and the exact name.    That's the problem.  None of that is secret.

 

Using signed (and trusted)  encryption keys, The credit card number never has to be part of the transaction, EXCEPT for the assignment of the initial credential.   Eventually, you'll not even need that. 

 

after that, you establish who you are to your bank, the bank tells the retailer... 'the person in front of you has our full faith and credit'  The transactions happens, the money gets to the retailer.   In theory, only your bank and Apple have to know it's you.   The retailer, needs only to know they will get paid.

post #51 of 95

Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

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post #52 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post
 

 

If Apple is facilitating the "float" then they would be taking on the risk of acting as middleman, but they'd also be disintermediating the banks and eventually the credit card companies themselves, after consumers realize they don't need a credit card at all.

Apple isn't doing that. (yet*)

 

Apple will merely charge the credit card issuers passed on to the retailers who really pay for everything, that the phone in front of them is owned by the person who is holding it, and that the card information in that phone (more like the token sent by MC/Visa/AMEX) has not been tampered with.

 

That reduces card fraud immensely.

If your fraud loss as a Merchant is 1% and you're a million dollar a year store ($5,000 a day and $50 in CC fraud a day, of which your liable for all of it... read the fine print), that's $10,000.   If an iPhone transaction fraud risk is .01% ($100 a year ), would you pay .25% ($2500) to and net $7400 if all your buyers used that form of payment?

 

Say Apple gets that .2% of that transaction... Times eleventyBillion transactions on average of $50 (simple numbers)  $550B*.2% = 1.25Billion.

All that for the price of setting up an AppleID.

 

*(The Long game is Apple using your AppleID's CC on file as your 'bank', and eventually supplanting any intermediate Credit Card Processor, and dealing directly with the band card networks.

 

Then Apple Issues it's own Credit Card, that is not network affiliated, but works wherever your iPhone can purchase stuff.   With all the money overseas, it can meet the banking laws in most countries, and/or buy a bank in each... 

 

Apple is getting all the processing fees, has lower fraud, and is getting interest on the float.... House money)

 

 

 

Money for nothing and your Chicks for Free.

post #53 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by Apple ][ View Post

True, good point!

To be honest, I don't see how anybody who has more than $10 in their bank account would ever risk using any kind of Android phone.

I honestly don't understand why you always stoop this low with comments like this. Do you always denigrate people who don't make the same choices in life or buy the same types of products as you?

I honestly don't give a flying **** what the person next to me or down the street uses when it comes to their smartphones. That's their choice and I'm glad that there is choice in the marketplace. I don't want to live in a world where we all are slaves to the same exact products.
post #54 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by mnbob1 View Post

I agree. NFC is over hyped, not secure enough, and just a gimmick so far to say you have it. Bumping phones to share pictures is a lot different than making secure payments.

Not over-hyped in Japan. They've had contactless payments on their cellphones since 2005. That's right, almost *TEN* years ago. The USA is way behind on this tech.

 

People who don't understand this don't really know anything about consumer payment tech.

 

We get a lot of clueless comments in US-based tech forums. Appalling.

post #55 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mazda 3s View Post


I honestly don't understand why you always stoop this low with comments like this. Do you always denigrate people who don't make the same choices in life or buy the same types of products as you?

I honestly don't give a flying **** what the person next to me or down the street uses when it comes to their smartphones. That's their choice and I'm glad that there is choice in the marketplace. I don't want to live in a world where we all are slaves to the same exact products.

 

I believe in freedom of choice and freedom of speech. People are free to buy as many Android phones as they wish. I'm not stopping anybody from buying any Android phones. As a matter of fact, whenever I run into somebody that I don't particularly like, my first recommendation to them would be to buy an Android phone.

 

I also believe that Android is an inferior and crappy operating system, and there's nothing wrong with stating my views. I will continue to state these views for as long as I am able to.

 

As for stooping that low, it is Samsung and others who stoop that low with their stupid commercials. If Fandroids can't take the heat, then get out of the oven.

post #56 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by BobSchlob View Post
 

 

Ha! That's exactly what I thought Apple would do with the "cellular companies" back when the iPhone first came out and all that cellular spectrum went to auction.

 

I'm still waiting for "Appletel" or "iCellular" someday. 

Not going to happen. 

 

Apple does not invest in heavily regionally limited businesses. Mobile telephony operations are market-specific. If Apple buys T-Mobile USA, that doesn't help iPhone customers outside of the USA (there is more international revenue than domestic).

 

Apple's tech investments are in companies which typically have a broad-reaching impact on Apple's business, not something marginal. Companies like P.A. Semi, Intrinsity, etc., those are all companies that affect a wide range of products, not some pure play B.S.

post #57 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by mpantone View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by mnbob1 View Post

I agree. NFC is over hyped, not secure enough, and just a gimmick so far to say you have it. Bumping phones to share pictures is a lot different than making secure payments.
Not over-hyped in Japan. They've had contactless payments on their cellphones since 2005. That's right, almost *TEN* years ago. The USA is way behind on this tech.

People who don't understand this don't really know anything about consumer payment tech.

We get a lot of clueless comments in US-based tech forums. Appalling.

Whenever it's pointed out that NFC is a technology whose day has come and gone (without coming really), somebody always jumps in with "Yeah, but, yeah, but...JAPAN!" (Apalling.) Japan is famous for jumping on technological bandwagons before they're ready for prime time just to look like leaders instead of the followers they've always been. They jumped on analog HDTV, remember—which took such horrendous amounts of bandwidth that they had to launch a dedicated satellite that could only carry four channels. I don't think following Japan off a cliff is the best strategy.
post #58 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by Apple ][ View Post
 

 

I believe in freedom of choice and freedom of speech. People are free to buy as many Android phones as they wish. I'm not stopping anybody from buying any Android phones. As a matter of fact, whenever I run into somebody that I don't particularly like, my first recommendation to them would be to buy an Android phone.

 

I also believe that Android is an inferior and crappy operating system, and there's nothing wrong with stating my views. I will continue to state these views for as long as I am able to.

 

As for stooping that low, it is Samsung and others who stoop that low with their stupid commercials. If Fandroids can't take the heat, then get out of the oven.


I just wonder, if you get this offended and pissed off about what people choose for their smartphones (actually telling people you don't like the buy Android phones?), how must you feel about other things that people purchase? Their cars, their clothes, their house, their choice of where to live, if a family's children go to private or public school, if they eat foods with HFCS or hydrogenated oils...???

 

:lol:

 

I get that you hate Android... I completely get it. But you just seem to take it to the extreme -- where does the line get drawn? 

post #59 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mazda 3s View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by "Apple 
[" url="/t/182033/apple-reportedly-inks-deal-with-american-express-for-iphone-6-payment-system/40#post_2587099"]
 

I believe in freedom of choice and freedom of speech. People are free to buy as many Android phones as they wish. I'm not stopping anybody from buying any Android phones. As a matter of fact, whenever I run into somebody that I don't particularly like, my first recommendation to them would be to buy an Android phone.

I also believe that Android is an inferior and crappy operating system, and there's nothing wrong with stating my views. I will continue to state these views for as long as I am able to.

As for stooping that low, it is Samsung and others who stoop that low with their stupid commercials. If Fandroids can't take the heat, then get out of the oven.


I just wonder, if you get this offended and pissed off about what people choose for their smartphones (actually telling people you don't like the buy Android phones?), how must you feel about other things that people purchase? Their cars, their clothes, their house, their choice of where to live, if a family's children go to private or public school, if they eat foods with HFCS or hydrogenated oils...???

lol.gif

I get that you hate Android... I completely get it. But you just seem to take it to the extreme -- where does the line get drawn? 

Disclaimer: I hate Android as much as he does.

His declared position is that Apple products should be priced out of the range where those who don't deserve to have them can afford them. He's probably working from that list conservatives have been shopping around for years: "It's scandalous that in America poor people have..." and then there's a whole laundry list of items like "color TVs" (Where would you buy a black-and-white TV exactly?), and refrigerators, which shows you how old this list is. Anyway, in recent years they've added cell phones to the items that poor people don't deserve. Remember the "Obamaphone" hysteria about services like Assurance Wireless, even though assistance was extended to wireless phones during the Bush (or was it Clinton?) administration.

Android as a cheaper (up front) alternative, blurs the line between the haves and the have-nots that he wants to keep crystal clear, both here and between this country and the "Third World Hellholes" (In his charming phrase) where it's the dominant system.
post #60 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mac-sochist View Post


Whenever it's pointed out that NFC is a technology whose day has come and gone (without coming really), somebody always jumps in with "Yeah, but, yeah, but...JAPAN!" (Apalling.) Japan is famous for jumping on technological bandwagons before they're ready for prime time just to look like leaders instead of the followers they've always been. They jumped on analog HDTV, remember—which took such horrendous amounts of bandwidth that they had to launch a dedicated satellite that could only carry four channels. I don't think following Japan off a cliff is the best strategy.

Following Japan's nine-year old NFC lead is hardly following them off a cliff.

 

Note that no one has claimed that "Osaifu keitai" was a half-baked technology. It was based off of putting a Mobile SUICA card on a cellphone. It was already useful from Day 1.

 

But thanks for your B.S. fear mongering. It's so novel in 2014.

 

Also, you should rethink your spell checking software. Whatever you are using is appalling.

post #61 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mac-sochist View Post

Whenever it's pointed out that NFC is a technology whose day has come and gone (without coming really)...

Excluding any markets that have currently implemented NFC is some way, why do you think NFC's day has both come and gone.

I feel that NFC's day hasn't yet happened since it's never been implemented well within HW, an OS with APIs and frameworks, and been supported by a robust ecosystem with leading industry partners. What is being rumoured now is what I've been saying need to be in place before Apple can get on board.

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post #62 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by mpantone View Post

But thanks for your B.S. fear mongering. It's so novel in 2014.

Also, you should rethink your spell checking software. Whatever you are using is appalling.

It's not my spell checking software, it's my sticky keyboard, which doesn't seem to like double letters lately, but thanks for your condescension. NFC is still a technology whose day has gone without ever arriving.
post #63 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mac-sochist View Post

Whenever it's pointed out that NFC is a technology whose day has come and gone (without coming really)...

Excluding any markets that have currently implemented NFC is some way, why do you think NFC's day has both come and gone.

I feel that NFC's day hasn't yet happened since it's never been implemented well within HW, an OS with APIs and frameworks, and been supported by a robust ecosystem with leading industry partners. What is being rumoured now is what I've been saying need to be in place before Apple can get on board.

I can only go by my own observation. I've seen one NFC payment terminal, maybe 6 or 8 years ago, in a Jack-in-the-Box, gathering dust. Never seen one used. If that was the initial surge, I'd say the decline is pretty much over by now. I've never understood how sliding a card through a slot was such a hardship.
post #64 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mac-sochist View Post

I can only go by my own observation. I've seen one NFC payment terminal, maybe 6 or 8 years ago, in a Jack-in-the-Box, gathering dust. Never seen one used. If that was the initial surge, I'd say the decline is pretty much over by now. I've never understood how sliding a card through a slot was such a hardship.

That's my point. There was this feeble, halfhearted and shortsighted attempt to make the tech feasible. What has happened up until now in the US was bound to fail, but the technology itself has always had promise, the problem is way too many think that if technology has promise everything else will fall into place; and perhaps at one one point in human history that was true (Clovis blade?), but not today, and not when you need HW, SW, partners and a complex infrastructure to get going.

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post #65 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by macinthe408 View Post



What if Apple covers the fees, like they do when one buys content from the iTunes Store?



As you state, CC companies will want their cut, but I'm sure Apple can sweeten the pot, while also throwing in some fraud-prevention bullet points in their presentation to the card companies. I think the chip-and-PIN movement is finally starting to take hold in the US, and this (Touch ID) might be a good way to move the needle even further.



[In related future news: California Institutes Mandatory 50-year Jail Sentence for Criminals Who Peddle Black Market Thumbs Used in Touch ID Scams.]

 



I highly doubt Apple would cover credit card fees, it would make no sense and would make this this whole idea a cash suck, something Apple rarely does. I've spent the past two years selling point of sale and very familiar with credit card companies, so I'll explain what I think will happen.

Apple is cutting out all the middlemen processors and working directly with the credit card companies. Those companies will give Apple a specific rate and Apple will mark it up a tad and that is what retailers will get charged to process credit cards. The rate will likely be flat and very enticing to retailers and Apple will make a very small cut on every transaction that goes through the system, making Apple a lot of money just like when it takes 30% from the iTune and App Store.

I do not think Apple's goal is to replace credit card companies, they just want to create a method to store credit cards on your phone and use your phone to pay for items, thus locking you further into the Apple ecosystem. Just like with Passbook, Apple isn't trying to replace ticketing companies, they just want to create a better and more paperless way to to receive and have those tickets accepted. Apple is essentially getting into the credit card processing business, not the credit card business.
post #66 of 95

I can't wait to drive through a fast food joint, have my favorite menu items come up on my phone immediately, confirm the order using the iWallet function, have the robots assemble my order, pick up the order at the window and drive off with no humans involved in the process. It's coming sooner than we think and I look forward to it.

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post #67 of 95

Oh, by the way... cool new video of the Apple torus construction site:  

 

 

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post #68 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by Apple ][ View Post


I also believe that Android is an inferior and crappy operating system, and there's nothing wrong with stating my views.

I disagree strongly. "That Android is an inferior ... operating system" is fact. Not a view.
post #69 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by Apple ][ View Post

I have no choice but to report your post.

1) You have/had a choice.

2) Note he didn't say you were a douchebag, but he stated what he thought someone else was saying. I'm not sure if that was a veiled insult or not.
Edited by SolipsismX - 8/31/14 at 11:28pm

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post #70 of 95


What if the "iWatch" has the rumored NFC chip and thus allows the 5s to also partake in the mobile wallet initiative? Not ideal or the way Apple usually works in regards to bringing new features to market, but it'd be something.

 

Better yet they could fit in a flush mounted Touch ID sensor into the iWatch, thus allowing all phones supporting iOS 8 into the tap to pay game. 

post #71 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mazda 3s View Post

I honestly don't understand why you always stoop this low with comments like this. Do you always denigrate people who don't make the same choices in life or buy the same types of products as you?

I honestly don't give a flying **** what the person next to me or down the street uses when it comes to their smartphones. That's their choice and I'm glad that there is choice in the marketplace. I don't want to live in a world where we all are slaves to the same exact products.

I don't think acknowledging the dangers and limitations of a platform are exactly the same thing as suggesting we should all be slaves to the same products. And although I disagree with the constant Apple / fandroid baiting, I have to admit I share the view about Android being a poor security choice.

People use these devices for sensitive, private matters - among them financial transactions. And against that, Google has not done enough, in my opinion, to ensure that their platform is secure and safe for their users. In fact, I would go so far as to say that the Android ecosystem verges on a high tech version of the Wild West; it is in real terms basically lawless. And consumers are not even informed of these risks, nor does Google actively work to patch these security concerns. Android systems are, I think, wisely distrusted because of these factors.
post #72 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post


1) You have/had a choice.

2) Note he didn't say you were a douchebag, but he stated his what he thought someone else was saying. I'm not sure if that was a veiled insult or not.

 

LOL!  :lol:

No Matte == No Sale :-(
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No Matte == No Sale :-(
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post #73 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by Soundvision View Post

I highly doubt Apple would cover credit card fees, it would make no sense and would make this this whole idea a cash suck, something Apple rarely does. I've spent the past two years selling point of sale and very familiar with credit card companies, so I'll explain what I think will happen.

Apple is cutting out all the middlemen processors and working directly with the credit card companies. Those companies will give Apple a specific rate and Apple will mark it up a tad and that is what retailers will get charged to process credit cards. The rate will likely be flat and very enticing to retailers and Apple will make a very small cut on every transaction that goes through the system, making Apple a lot of money just like when it takes 30% from the iTune and App Store.

I do not think Apple's goal is to replace credit card companies, they just want to create a method to store credit cards on your phone and use your phone to pay for items, thus locking you further into the Apple ecosystem. Just like with Passbook, Apple isn't trying to replace ticketing companies, they just want to create a better and more paperless way to to receive and have those tickets accepted. Apple is essentially getting into the credit card processing business, not the credit card business.

 

 ^ This. ^

 

Apple could get a tiny tick of incremental revenue, but they might even choose to skip that part, because more importantly they'll get tons of iPhone sales (upgrades).  Depending on specifics, this could be very appealing to the existing hundreds of millions of users of older iPhones.  You know, everyone who has been waiting for some significant reason to upgrade.

 

Think about Samsung and other manufacturers that don't own their entire ecosystem.  How will their new models entice users to upgrade?  A few more megapixels in the camera?  Tilt to scroll?  Pfft.  How could Samsung create a new model for electronic payments?  Almost impossible; they have to wait for Apple to blaze the trail, then eventually they might be able to jump into the stream and join the party.  

 

The credit card companies themselves are playing with fire though.  Right now they're a very necessary part of the system, but eventually Apple could choose to cut them out (or severely limit their take).  Think about how much control AT&T and the other carriers had over their users' experience prior to the iPhone.  Look at them now.  This is what I think will eventually happen with electronic transactions.

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post #74 of 95

I'm getting a bit excited about this. Wether it'll be backed by NFC or not, I'm sure Apple will have it thought through to be easy enough for the user (no need to think about the technology behind it).

 

CC companies will not be left out. Apple is not going to enter that field.

 

What I'm seeing here is a payment system that will work OK for shops, restaurants ect.... but what about paypal? What if Apple has a system that is also used for purchases made with your iPhone/iPad? Totally speculating here, but maybe there's a "paykit" framework out there that and a user only has to put his thumb on the home button and make a purchase from any app or even website using his AppleID. They have been bragging about so many million accounts with CC behind them. Give users the ability to manage more than one card in their account and never need to pull it out of their pocket. Wether it's a webshop or a real shop. CC info and security code stays in your pocket, all u do is use Touch ID (just like AppStore purchases). Would be neat!

 

Bottom line: CC companies will play along and get their usual share. I see PayPal in danger here.

post #75 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacBook Pro View Post

I am not convinced that Apple is including NFC on iPhone 6 despite the evidence. Most of the iPhone 6 hardware leaks are from a single, essentially unknown source.

The important thing is to make it sound official and like multiple sources by calling it "a new report."

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
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"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
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post #76 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by Soundvision View Post

I do not think Apple's goal is to replace credit card companies, they just want to create a method to store credit cards on your phone and use your phone to pay for items, thus locking you further into the Apple ecosystem. Just like with Passbook, Apple isn't trying to replace ticketing companies, they just want to create a better and more paperless way to to receive and have those tickets accepted. Apple is essentially getting into the credit card processing business, not the credit card business.

Exactly my thoughts on the topic.

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
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"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
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post #77 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by mpantone View Post

Not over-hyped in Japan. They've had contactless payments on their cellphones since 2005. That's right, almost *TEN* years ago. The USA is way behind on this tech.

If it's so great, why hasn't it been adopted around the world? How successful is the adoption of NFC in Japan?
post #78 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post

If it's so great, why hasn't it been adopted around the world? How successful is the adoption of NFC in Japan?

NFC payments are not new in Canada either.

Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

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Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

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post #79 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thomas Tupper View Post


I have to say, I think the idea that Amex has lower acceptance rates, at least in the US, is a little overblown.  I use an Amex BCE for almost every purchase I make (cash back on all spending is pretty great), and in two years of doing so I've had exactly one establishment tell me they didn't take it.

I don't think it's overblown, but I can't give you a credible cite. I recall seeing numbers such as less than ten million terminals for Amex, versus many tens of millions for Visa and MasterCard.

I've been turned down many more times than 'once,' and while I prefer to pay with Amex, I always carry at least one extra credit card.
post #80 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post

NFC payments are not new in Canada either.

I've just not heard a lot of about them, but that's perhaps just me.

The larger point is, if it's already widely adopted, there's no problem in Apple jumping into it. If it's not, there's an opportunity for Apple, given the quantity and quality of its iOS clientele worldwide, to popularize it. A win either way.
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