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Apple 'actively investigating' celebrity photo leaks for possible iCloud connection

post #1 of 211
Thread Starter 
Apple on Monday confirmed in a short statement that it is in the process of determining whether or not security breaches in its online services were responsible for the outing of hundreds of racy photos of celebrities, including actress Jennifer Lawrence and model Kate Upton, over the weekend.




"We take user privacy very seriously and are actively investigating this report," Apple representative Natalie Kerris told Re/code. The company has not made any further public comment.

Rumors of an iCloud security breach began circulating as soon as the first photos hit the web on Sunday, though there remains scant evidence to support the claims. The original poster of the images on web forum 4chan indicated that the shots had been collected from Apple's online service, but also admitted to having gathered the photos from others, making it unlikely that they are privy to the technical details of the leaks.

The fact that many of the celebrities were shown taking "selfies" with Android or Blackberry handsets cast even more doubt on iCloud's role. Other services, including Snapchat and Dropbox, have also been implicated at various times with similarly nonexistent levels of evidence.

Adding confusion to the mix was the Monday disclosure of a flaw in Apple's "Find my iPhone" service that could allow attackers to use brute force tactics against weak iCloud passwords when the login email address was known. Apple quickly patched that hole, and it is unclear what role, if any, it may have played in the leak.

Numerous previous leaks that had been initially attributed to "hacks" were later found to actually be the result of a combination of social engineering techniques and poor password management on the part of the victims, and those issues remain the most likely explanations for Sunday's release.
post #2 of 211
#1 rule - never have pictures of yourself naked on a phone, any phone or computer.
#2 rule - never let anyone take your picture naked.

follow these two simple rules.
post #3 of 211
1) Why put up a 938KB ""10314-2477-photosharing_hero-l.png? Can't AI simply put an 80KB .jpg in the thread instead please?

2) Bit late to the party on this story AI, already discussed in depth over here:
http://forums.appleinsider.com/t/182037/apples-secret-iphone-6-digital-payment-system-said-to-also-include-visa-mastercard
FYI, that was yesterday

3) I didn't see any proof of a 5.5 incher in those pics¡
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post #4 of 211
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post
[....]The original poster of the images on web forum 4chan indicated that the shots had been collected from Apple's online service, but also admitted to having gathered the photos from others, making it unlikely that they are privy to the technical details of the leaks.
[....]
The fact that many of the celebrities were shown taking "selfies" with Android or Blackberry handsets cast even more doubt on iCloud's role. Other services, including Snapchat and Dropbox, have also been implicated at various times with similarly nonexistent levels of evidence.
[....]
Adding confusion to the mix was the Monday disclosure of a flaw in Apple's "Find my iPhone" service that could allow attackers to use brute force tactics against weak iCloud passwords when the login email address was known. Apple quickly patched that hole, and it is unclear what role, if any, it may have played in the leak.
[....]

lots of people 'get' photos via email or MMS... although it's an exercise for the user to put them into your photo stream, it's a pretty minor effort to mine your apple email if I got your password by hook or by crook.  Or just hook up a phone to each of these accounts with the apple ID password, and latch onto the streams of information (notes, photo streams, etc).

 

 

NB:

I love the irony of people who get photographed at various levels of undress, and then take/get/store pictures of themselves in various levels of undress, and then claim foul when they feel their 'privacy' was impinged. (I know, the choice of what is published and what is personal is the very definition of privacy).  'Exposure' is their only fungible asset.

 

Now Justin Verlander... what did Mickey Say "Lay off the Women... Women Weaken Legs!"  He got more than his fair share of exposure.

post #5 of 211
Quote:
Originally Posted by PhilBoogie View Post

3) I didn't see any proof of a 5.5 incher in those pics¡

No, but there were a couple of definite 'large diagonals' exposed.;-)

post #6 of 211
Leaving anything you don't want seen in an online computer or repository with anything less than best practices (frequently changed LastPass passwords, two factor authentication, 256 bit AES encryption, e.g.) is an invitation to the "hackarazzis"...

...that said, sometimes I wonder about some of the photos that get leaked, i.e., I can see wannabe D-listers, somewhat there starlets who can't get press, and those finding themselves losing relevance, "Wow, look what leaks did for Paris Hilton and [insert relevant 15 minutes of fame and looking for more name here]...."

....and then kinda, sorta, maybe leaving some stuff where it practically begs to be picked up and published, and then getting in front of the media cameras all indignant (but lookin' good!) and upping their Q factor...
Edited by bigpics - 9/1/14 at 4:45pm

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An iPhone, a Leatherman and thou...  ...life is complete.

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post #7 of 211
Quote:
Originally Posted by PhilBoogie View Post

2) Bit late to the party on this story AI, already discussed in depth over here:
http://forums.appleinsider.com/t/182037/apples-secret-iphone-6-digital-payment-system-said-to-also-include-visa-mastercard
FYI, that was yesterday

Yesterday was really just the celebrity stuff. Today is an actual article about Apple actively investigating the leak of photos that appear to have come from iCloud. The other tech sites are also only now reporting on Apple investigating how these accounts were breached.

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

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"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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post #8 of 211
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigpics View Post

Leaving anything you don't want seen in an online computer or repository with anything less than best practices (frequently changed LastPass passwords, two factor authentication, 256 AES encryption, e.g.) is an invitation to the "hackarazzis"...

...that said, sometimes I wonder about some of the photos that get leaked, i.e., I can see wannabe D-listers, somewhat there starlets who can't get press, and those finding themselves losing relevance, "Wow, look what leaks did for Paris Hilton and [insert relevant 15 minutes of fame and looking for more name here]...."

....and then kinda, sorta, maybe leaving some stuff where it practically begs to be picked up and published, and then getting in front of the media cameras all indignant (but lookin' good!) and upping their Q factor...

agreed.  on all points.

 

I did bring up adding the TouchID /secure enclave to all Macs (I wonder if it's possible without the ARM chip), thus making apple's iCloud access fully 2 factor from all Apple-Sold vantage points (would require an iPod Touch with touchID, and maybe a TouchID on your AppleTV remote... but I digress....).

 

The fact that Apple's site would allow for infinite tries made me feel this was a targeted attack on individuals, probably seeding passwords captures through other means, and then doing brute force if no hits.

post #9 of 211

Hmm. I assume the person in charge of the 'active investigation' has to take a proper inventory of all the compromising data on iCloud, so as to have an accurate sense of what proportion was hacked/compromised, no?

 

Nice job....

post #10 of 211
Quote:
Originally Posted by PhilBoogie View Post

3) I didn't see any proof of a 5.5 incher in those pics¡

That's because only naked women were hacked ;)

post #11 of 211
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigpics View Post

Leaving anything you don't want seen in an online computer or repository with anything less than best practices (frequently changed LastPass passwords, two factor authentication, 256 AES encryption, e.g.) is an invitation to the "hackarazzis"...

1) I know LastPass is free but I don't care for their UI and that it's all saved on their servers.

2) I'm not sure if LastPass has this security feature but when I click on my 1Password browser extension to add a username and password 1Password will first warn me that the site is not using SSL. In all cases this is one of those wonky webpage setups that you can click Submit on the empty field to have the page reloads with SSL page telling you your submitted username and password were incorrect and to type them in again. Or just change the HTTP to HTTPS, but I find the other way faster. Anyway… does LastPass have that?

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

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post #12 of 211
Originally Posted by LunarMoon View Post
#1 rule - never have pictures of yourself naked on a phone, any phone or computer.
#2 rule - never let anyone take your picture naked.

 

You’d be surprised at the number of people who claim this isn’t a valid argument and that people should be allowed to do whatever they want.

Originally Posted by Marvin

The only thing more insecure than Android’s OS is its userbase.
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Originally Posted by Marvin

The only thing more insecure than Android’s OS is its userbase.
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post #13 of 211
So is Apple confirming that iCloud was breached or is that what they're investigating? Because the media has run with this story (being a slow news weekend with Labor Day holiday and all) and are basically calling it an iCloud hack.
post #14 of 211
This reaks of a public smear a week before the latest iPhone release.

It staggers me that ALL of the major news sites are reporting this as an iCloud hack in their headlines before briefly mentioning deep within the articles that this information has not been verified.

What the f*ck has happened to reporting these days?
Edited by GTR - 9/1/14 at 2:24pm
Apple managed the astonishing feat of getting the equivalent of a personal computer into the hands of everybody from eight to eighty year olds, and did so while providing absolutely no instructions...
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Apple managed the astonishing feat of getting the equivalent of a personal computer into the hands of everybody from eight to eighty year olds, and did so while providing absolutely no instructions...
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post #15 of 211
Quote:
Originally Posted by PhilBoogie View Post

1) Why put up a 938KB ""10314-2477-photosharing_hero-l.png? Can't AI simply put an 80KB .jpg in the thread instead please?

2) Bit late to the party on this story AI, already discussed in depth over here:
http://forums.appleinsider.com/t/182037/apples-secret-iphone-6-digital-payment-system-said-to-also-include-visa-mastercard
FYI, that was yesterday

3) I didn't see any proof of a 5.5 incher in those pics¡

Why does it matter so much about the size of the photo? I have no issues with them.
post #16 of 211
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rogifan View Post

So is Apple confirming that iCloud was breached or is that what they're investigating? Because the media has run with this story (being a slow news weekend with Labor Day holiday and all) and are basically calling it an iCloud hack.

On the one side Antennagate.

 

I hope apple does it right, and shows who[was it 200 celebs or 200,000,000 people] was hacked and how, what they did (if anything) to prevent it.

 

Apple's response to Antennagate was slow, measured, and basically, a problem in the industry, not with our phone.

 

But if anything,everyone should be changing their AppleID passwords, just a a matter of good hygiene 

post #17 of 211
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

You’d be surprised at the number of people who claim this isn’t a valid argument and that people should be allowed to do whatever they want.

They do have a point.

And let's face it, anarchy has generally worked out well for anybody who's ever tried it in the past.

/s
Apple managed the astonishing feat of getting the equivalent of a personal computer into the hands of everybody from eight to eighty year olds, and did so while providing absolutely no instructions...
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Apple managed the astonishing feat of getting the equivalent of a personal computer into the hands of everybody from eight to eighty year olds, and did so while providing absolutely no instructions...
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post #18 of 211
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheOtherGeoff View Post

On the one side Antennagate.

I hope apple does it right, and shows who[was it 200 celebs or 200,000,000 people] was hacked and how, what they did (if anything) to prevent it.

Apple's response to Antennagate was slow, measured, and basically, a problem in the industry, not with our phone.

But if anything,everyone should be changing their AppleID passwords, just a a matter of good hygiene 
If this wasn't an iCloud hack there's nothing for Apple to show. Unfortunately everyone seems to be rushing to blame it on an iCloud hack when no one knows for sure if that's what happened. I find it highly suspicious this comes out a week before Apple's big event.
post #19 of 211
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheOtherGeoff View Post
 

NB:

I love the irony of people who get photographed at various levels of undress, and then take/get/store pictures of themselves in various levels of undress, and then claim foul when they feel their 'privacy' was impinged. (I know, the choice of what is published and what is personal is the very definition of privacy).  'Exposure' is their only fungible asset.

 

Now Justin Verlander... what did Mickey Say "Lay off the Women... Women Weaken Legs!"  He got more than his fair share of exposure.

Rant is a little hard to follow; but are you saying that if they had been clothed, then the situation would not be "impinged privacy", and they would then have no "claim" of foul?

(or in other words; what does their level of undress have to do with anything?)

post #20 of 211
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rogifan View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheOtherGeoff View Post

On the one side Antennagate.

I hope apple does it right, and shows who[was it 200 celebs or 200,000,000 people] was hacked and how, what they did (if anything) to prevent it.

Apple's response to Antennagate was slow, measured, and basically, a problem in the industry, not with our phone.

But if anything,everyone should be changing their AppleID passwords, just a a matter of good hygiene 
If this wasn't an iCloud hack there's nothing for Apple to show. Unfortunately everyone seems to be rushing to blame it on an iCloud hack when no one knows for sure if that's what happened. I find it highly suspicious this comes out a week before Apple's big event.

Ha! Hardly suspicious.  More likely; "expected". (never fails :no:)

Still a week to go. Won't be the least bit surprised if somebody tries yet another smear before then.

post #21 of 211
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheOtherGeoff View Post
 

On the one side Antennagate.

 

I hope apple does it right, and shows who[was it 200 celebs or 200,000,000 people] was hacked and how, what they did (if anything) to prevent it.

 

Apple's response to Antennagate was slow, measured, and basically, a problem in the industry, not with our phone.

 

But if anything,everyone should be changing their AppleID passwords, just a a matter of good hygiene 

This is different.   Apple is typically quick about fixing security holes(well, as fast as they can fix these things).    They've already patched the hole that allowed unlimited number of password tries.     No, i'm not changing my password.    They had to know my email address first.  Even then, my password is strong enough that even a brute force won't break it(unless they try every combination of characters which will take years).    Typical brute force method uses a list of known weak passwords.   In some cases, they may try dictionary attack, but that's rarely done online due to the number of tries needed.   Dictionary attack is normally done locally where it's much quicker.   

These celebs had easy passwords or they were retrieved via social engineering, phishing or some other method.

 

If you have good password, i wouldn't worry about it.....unless it turns out that there was some systemwide hack on iCloud(which is extremely unlikely).

post #22 of 211
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheOtherGeoff View Post

On the one side Antennagate.

I hope apple does it right, and shows who[was it 200 celebs or 200,000,000 people] was hacked and how, what they did (if anything) to prevent it.

Apple's response to Antennagate was slow, measured, and basically, a problem in the industry, not with our phone.

But if anything,everyone should be changing their AppleID passwords, just a a matter of good hygiene 

  1. It definitely needs to be looked into but I think iCloud servers being hacked seems like the least likely scenario to me.

    The most likely options I see are either A) it was usernames and passwords gains from some major hack, like that 1.2 billion user data dump recently in the news, where the hackers looked for specific celebrities and hoped they were using the same password for iCloud as well as whatever crappy account the ill-gotten username and passwords were retrieved, or B) they targeted these particular celebrities by using social hacking to figure out how to access their accounts.


  2. What I'd love to see with iCloud is what Google does with Gmail. You have your master password but if you want an app like Mail, Mailbox, Hop, Outlook, or whatever app you want to use you don't input your username and master password to log in, but your username and a randomly generated password for that specific device that will only allow for sending and receiving

    If the app makers want to be nefarious they can still harvest data locally and send it back to their servers, but they won't ever be able to use that generated password to log in to google.com so your personal account settings and everything else it connects to is kept safe. Or, perhaps more realistically, if that username and password for say, your Gmail account in Apple Mail is intercepted and decrypted they won't be able to use it to log into google.com or even use it to sign in via another device once it's been set.



PS: We really need to teach kids about the potential longterm risks of their actions on the internet and pretty much anything they do with an electric device. I didn't choose an anonymous name here because I have something to hide from the average person here — and many of you do know my real name — but because you jut never know who in a digital world is looking to take advantage of you.

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

Reply

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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post #23 of 211
Quote:
Originally Posted by BobSchlob View Post

Ha! Hardly suspicious.  More likely; "expected". (never fails 1oyvey.gif )
Still a week to go. Won't be the least bit surprised if somebody tries yet another smear before then.
Oh I'm sure this won't be the last. No way this just happens to leak this weekend. It's a week before Apple's event and a holiday weekend in the US which means no hard news so it will get plenty of coverage.
post #24 of 211
Quote:
Originally Posted by LunarMoon View Post

#1 rule - never have pictures of yourself naked on a phone, any phone or computer.
#2 rule - never let anyone take your picture naked.

follow these two simple rules.

Yeah, but having any other photos that you wouldn't want compromised (like, maybe ANY of them) is fine.

Hack away, dudes. Enjoy.

(and actually; why is this pertinent to photos? Same goes for ANY files)

post #25 of 211
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post
 

You’d be surprised at the number of people who claim this isn’t a valid argument and that people should be allowed to do whatever they want.

 

Stop blaming the victims when their privacy is breached. Apple, how could you?

Now I'll only trust my secrets to Google. /s

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

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"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
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post #26 of 211
Quote:
Originally Posted by SirLance99 View Post

Why does it matter so much about the size of the photo? I have no issues with them.

1) Data usage.
2) Time to download.
3) Why use a dozen 1.4MiB (each) PNGs when 150KiB JPEGs (each) would be more than adequate?

"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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"The real haunted empire?  It's the New York Times." ~SockRolid

"There is no rule that says the best phones must have the largest screen." ~RoundaboutNow

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post #27 of 211
Quote:
Originally Posted by john12345 View Post
 

This is different.   Apple is typically quick about fixing security holes(well, as fast as they can fix these things).    They've already patched the hole that allowed unlimited number of password tries.     No, i'm not changing my password.    They had to know my email address first.  Even then, my password is strong enough that even a brute force won't break it(unless they try every combination of characters which will take years).    Typical brute force method uses a list of known weak passwords.   In some cases, they may try dictionary attack, but that's rarely done online due to the number of tries needed.   Dictionary attack is normally done locally where it's much quicker.   

These celebs had easy passwords or they were retrieved via social engineering, phishing or some other method.

 

If you have good password, i wouldn't worry about it.....unless it turns out that there was some systemwide hack on iCloud(which is extremely unlikely).

Well, if it was a systemwide hack, then changing password won't help anyway, right?

post #28 of 211
Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post
1) Data usage.
2) Time to download.
3) Why use a dozen 1.4MiB (each) PNGs when 150KiB JPEGs (each) would be more than adequate?

 

On a slightly related note, I am 100% against the very existence of “mobile” websites and am disgusted that more–not fewer–of them exist since the creation of the iPhone. However, the thought that websites should be 

 

1. more streamlined

2. have smaller page sizes

3. optimize themselves for capped data connections

 

should not be dismissed. A single URL shouldn’t be 10 megabytes. Simultaneously get rid of code bloat and petition for the removal of caps; that’s what website creators should be doing in the face of the uptick of mobile Internet use.

 

AI could do what Apple does and serve up optimized images for the platform. You get retina images if you’re on a retina device but not if you’re on a regular one, etc.

Originally Posted by Marvin

The only thing more insecure than Android’s OS is its userbase.
Reply

Originally Posted by Marvin

The only thing more insecure than Android’s OS is its userbase.
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post #29 of 211
These idiots are victims of Phishing. Natural selection strikes again.
post #30 of 211
Another reason I'm suspicious about the timing is all rumors are pointing to Apple announcing a mobile payments scheme at the 9.9 event. Of course this hacking story will be fresh in people's minds (especially if the media keeps it out there) and any story about mobile payments will include this alleged hack to put doubts in people's minds whether they can trust Apple.
post #31 of 211
Quote:
 The original poster of the images on web forum 4chan indicated that the shots had been collected from Apple's online service

 

That doesn't mean iCloud was hacked.  They found the passwords from somewhere else and used them to log in to iCloud.

post #32 of 211
I have a hard time buying the Python hack. You can use Python to log into iCloud (simulating the way you might go to icloud.com and log in with a browser), but this won't accept a brute force attack. And Find My iPhone is something you get access to AFTER you've already logged in.
post #33 of 211
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

Apple on Monday confirmed in a short statement that it is in the process of determining whether or not security breaches in its online services were responsible for the outing of hundreds of racy photos of celebrities, including actress Jennifer Lawrence and model Kate Upton, over the weekend.
 

Looks nothing like Jennifer Lawrence & Kate Upton...

Maybe this is with no make-up?

post #34 of 211
Quote:
Originally Posted by EricTheHalfBee View Post

I have a hard time buying the Python hack. You can use Python to log into iCloud (simulating the way you might go to icloud.com and log in with a browser), but this won't accept a brute force attack. And Find My iPhone is something you get access to AFTER you've already logged in.

Not too familiar with Find My iPhone, but i guess it has a public facing API.    In THEORY, this could've been a method used by the hacker to gain access if someone had a very weak password.   However, I think most of the celebs were "hacked" via social engineering and such methods.   I think the photos were collected over YEARS by many different hackers and traded between them.    Someone finally decided to release the dam.

post #35 of 211
Quote:
Originally Posted by GTR View Post

This reaks of a public smear a week before the latest iPhone release.

It staggers me that ALL of the major news sites are reporting this as an iCloud hack in their headlines before briefly mentioning deep within the articles that this information has not been verified.

What the f*ck has happened to reporting these days?

 

Clicks are money. No clicks and the kids go without braces.

Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

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Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

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post #36 of 211
Quote:
Originally Posted by LunarMoon View Post

#1 rule - never have pictures of yourself naked on a phone, any phone or computer.
#2 rule - never let anyone take your picture naked.

follow these two simple rules.

 

Regardless of what pictures are taken on your phone, any phone or computer they should be secure.  You may as well say never let anyone take your picture full stop.

MacBook Pro 17" early-2011 with 8GB RAM, , Apple TV 3rd Gen, iPhone 6 Plus 128GB Space Grey
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MacBook Pro 17" early-2011 with 8GB RAM, , Apple TV 3rd Gen, iPhone 6 Plus 128GB Space Grey
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post #37 of 211
Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post
Clicks are money. No clicks and the kids go without braces.

 

 

“Clickthroughs!” “Lisa needs braces!” “Clickthroughs!” “Lisa needs braces!” “Clickthroughs!” “Lisa needs braces!” “Clickthroughs!” “Lisa needs braces!”

 

“If we make our article titles less misleading... I won’t be able to pay for Lisa’s braces!”

Originally Posted by Marvin

The only thing more insecure than Android’s OS is its userbase.
Reply

Originally Posted by Marvin

The only thing more insecure than Android’s OS is its userbase.
Reply
post #38 of 211
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

You’d be surprised at the number of people who claim this isn’t a valid argument and that people should be allowed to do whatever they want.

It's not a problem if they fully understand the inherent dangers in doing so.
"Few things are harder to put up with than the annoyance of a good example" Mark Twain
"Just because something is deemed the law doesn't make it just" - SolipsismX
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"Few things are harder to put up with than the annoyance of a good example" Mark Twain
"Just because something is deemed the law doesn't make it just" - SolipsismX
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post #39 of 211
Originally Posted by dasanman69 View Post
It's not a problem if they fully understand the inherent dangers in doing so.


If they fully understood the inherent dangers, they wouldn’t do it in the first place.

Originally Posted by Marvin

The only thing more insecure than Android’s OS is its userbase.
Reply

Originally Posted by Marvin

The only thing more insecure than Android’s OS is its userbase.
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post #40 of 211

Kirsten Dunst seems to believe that her iCloud account was hacked.

 

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