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Life expectancy of windows

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 
I consider to change my windows (the real one, not the crappy stuff coming from MS ) in a near future. Many windows now are made of PVC some of Aluminium and few are still made of Wood. My windows are made of oak and are 70 years old. They are nice too look, but are awfull for the isolation (sound and heat). I consider to change them for new one with double glass isolation. PVC looks great (i want them white anyway) but i wonder if their life expectancy is important ? or is it a better investissement to buy aluminium ?

Your advice are appreciated . Thanks in advance.
post #2 of 12
vinyl clad wood windows are about the most popular type. If you get a name brand window...pella/andersen you WILL get a longer life out of them. I have seen the HomeDepot/ Menards cheapo "vinyl clad or all vinyl" windows crack and fall apart in no time, so they are a poor investment.
I used to have aluminum windows in my house....never again, if you have any problems with the "thermal-isolation" in the frame, you will have frost the size of a midgets arm on the inside of you windows.
Also, I work in the commercial/industrial construction industry, and see the aluminum windows all the time, and they are tough (at least the high $ industrial one are), but I would leave Alum windows to the commercial/industrial buildings.
post #3 of 12
I think you should try your best to save the old wood frames. They require a bit more maintenance but at 70 years the probably fit the character of the home better and in their fully restored state will look better than most vinyl/alu jobs.

I wonder if anyone can retrofit double glass panes to the old frames, at least to the fascias.
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post #4 of 12
Thread Starter 
MagicFingers : do you think that even good qualitie all vinyl window are doomed to crack and fall apart ? and is aluminium windows with internal thermal bridge break a good buy ?

Matsu : the original windows are more cute, but have a bad aerian proof, something that a double glass retrofit cannot improve. Futhermore my windows are made of many small rectangles glass, if they are changed by double glass, they will lost their design.
post #5 of 12
They just put new Windows AL in my building. I can't see why they wouldn't last forever. The plastic ones seem cheap to me. Look at the R value.
post #6 of 12
Do you have plate glass? Then you must save those windows, whatever the cost. If not, ship them to me when you rip them out, I'll pay for shipping, and I still od business with France

I think you can do quite a bit to bring those up to snuff actually. The frames need to be stipped and all the glass needs to be resealed, and then the frames need to be refitted to the openings and any problems adressed. Rotted pieces replaced openings adjusted etc etc...

You'll never have the R value of new windows, but that's a small price to pay. I wonder if there are any products that can let you save the windows and get an extra layer of glasss on hte inside?
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post #7 of 12
Thread Starter 
Matsu : i don't understand to what you refer with plate glass. In my dictionnarie plate glass refer to the old mirror glass. I thinks you refer to the glass coming from a glass-glower, something that we can find in a very old house (i think house from the eighteen century, but i am not a specialist).
post #8 of 12
Quote:
Originally posted by Powerdoc
Matsu : i don't understand to what you refer with plate glass. In my dictionnarie plate glass refer to the old mirror glass. I thinks you refer to the glass coming from a glass-glower, something that we can find in a very old house (i think house from the eighteen century, but i am not a specialist).

You can still find it in post WWI houses. The glass was rolled between two giant rollers and cooled on plates. Since the rollerswere never perfectly uniform and the cooling wasn't as carefully controlled, the glass itself was never perfectly uniform but had a slight wave to it. Usually, it comes in small panes that have to be assembled together to fill out a large window opening. Often the edges of each pane are also beveled. When they're clean and securely mounted they have a jewel like shimmer in the sunlight.
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post #9 of 12
Powerdoc How old is your home? What Year built? It is up to you to decide to buy new windows or not. If you have individually "glazed" in windows then I think the value of the architecture is greater than the value of "potential savings" in energy cost etc. of new windows. Take the money you would have spent on new windows which must be a large amount or budget in the thousands and invest it. Again I am not sure exactly the reason you wish for a change. Is it a major problem that you have now with the old windows or is it something that has tempted you by you seeing the new windows? Again it is your choice with your home.

Fellowship
May the peace of the Lord be with you always

Share your smile, Have respect for others, and be loving to all peoples

Paul in Athens: Acts 17 : 16-34
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May the peace of the Lord be with you always

Share your smile, Have respect for others, and be loving to all peoples

Paul in Athens: Acts 17 : 16-34
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post #10 of 12
Thread Starter 
Thanks for your advice. My house was built in 1930 and is made of rock : Granit, my windows are huge window : 1,40 * 2, 80 meters, the top of the window is circular. I think that i will change only some windows, i will change the windows of my kitchen and the child one, because it's cold in winter (north part), and in a esthetic point of vue, only my neighboors can see this face of the house.

I would not change the windows of my saloon, my preferate room, they look nice and it's not really cold here in winter.
post #11 of 12
Quote:
Originally posted by Powerdoc
Your advice are appreciated . Thanks in advance.

May I suggest two-way mirror glas

- T.I.
MacBook Pro (Retina, 13-inch, Late 2013) / 2.6 GHz Intel Core i5 / 8GB RAM / 500GB SSD
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MacBook Pro (Retina, 13-inch, Late 2013) / 2.6 GHz Intel Core i5 / 8GB RAM / 500GB SSD
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post #12 of 12
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally posted by The Installer
May I suggest two-way mirror glas

- T.I.

Hmm interesting, if you are a vampire. With two way mirror, you would not see the daylight, and like every vampire you will not see your picture in the mirror.
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