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iPhone - Looks like the rumors were true... - Page 3

post #81 of 211
1596 DJ 3-Dec-02 at 09:07:00 15:14
DJN PRESS RELEASE: Nortel Unveils WWAN/WLAN Linking Tech >NT

Symbol: NT C/NT
Industry: CMT TEL XSTX XTSE
Subject: DJN DJWI CNW DJIN DJWB HIY PDT PRL TPCT WEI
Market Sector: NND TEC TPX
Geographic Region: CN NME ONT

DALLAS--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Dec. 3, 2002--

Expected to Be Industry's First Infrastructure Vendor to Tie
Emerging Hot Spots with Wireless Devices Operating on All Major
Wireless Access Technology Standards

Nortel Networks (NYSE:NT)(TSX:NT.) today announced the ability to provide
integrated solutions for wireless operators that will seamlessly link existing
and future Wireless Wide Area Networks (WWANs) with fast-emerging wireless
'hot spots,' also known as Wireless Local Area Networks (WLANs).
Nortel Networks integrated WWAN/ WLAN technology will give GSM, GPRS, UMTS
and CDMA wireless operators the opportunity to provide enterprises and
consumers with a single 'sign on' and seamless service between 2G/3G networks
and wireless hot spots. This solution will also give operators the capability
to provide consolidated billing, authentication and security without the need
to restructure existing network architectures.
This technology will help enable mobile workers to establish 'virtual
offices,' connect securely to corporate intranets, send and respond to
e-mails, access the Web, download files, and conduct business from virtually
any location. In addition, it will allow users to roam seamlessly between
wireless 2G/3G and WLAN networks with uninterrupted access to the same
Internet Protocol (IP) data services. The technology will also manage billing
information across networks so that end users can receive one consolidated
bill from their wireless operator.
"As part of our Wireless Data Networks strategy, Nortel Networks has
developed this comprehensive suite of solutions to allow wireless operators to
offer secure WLAN hotspot connectivity as an extension to their existing
wireless services," said Dave Murashige, vice president, strategic marketing,
Wireless Networks, Nortel Networks. "The WLAN strategy we are announcing today
demonstrates our commitment to helping operators create a mobile environment
that delivers users compelling content and data services from any location.
Our WLAN technology, coupled with our extensive experience in IP data
networking, will position operators to increase revenue potential and reduce
subscriber churn."
"Public access WLAN provides a good test bed for mobile data applications,
particularly those targeted at enterprise markets," said Jason Chapman, senior
analyst, Gartner. "With 3G mobile heavily relying on the take-up of data
services, it is not only in the interests of mobile operators but also of the
mobile infrastructure vendors to make sure that early data services are
successful, paving the way for 3G. Once mobile enterprise customers feel
security and pricing are not prohibitive, they will get used to, for example,
being able to pull out their laptops in a coffee shop and get access to
corporate data."
As part of its integrated WWAN/WLAN offering, Nortel Networks is working
with Mobility Network Systems, a leading supplier of carrier-class WLAN
solutions, to provide comprehensive solutions that will enable GSM, GPRS and
UMTS operators to integrate WLANs into their existing networks and service
platforms using SIM and RADIUS technology. In interoperability testing
conducted earlier this year, Mobility Networks ipRAN technology was
successfully integrated with Nortel Networks GSM, GPRS and UMTS core network
infrastructure and products, including Home Location Register (HLR) and Nortel
Networks Univity GPRS Gateway Serving Node (GGSN).
Nortel Networks CDMA technology will enable CDMA operators to provide WLAN
services to their customers using existing CDMA2000 core network equipment.
Nortel Networks is working in collaboration with Bridgewater Systems and
MetaSolv to support common authentication and billing between CDMA2000 and
Wi-Fi networks, enabling a single 'sign-on' for the customer and consolidated
billing information. CDMA operators can choose to deploy their own WLAN access
networks or act as a virtual network operator through WLAN access wholesalers
or aggregators.
Nortel Networks Univity GGSN/PDSN, based on Nortel Networks Shasta platform,
can provide a number of value-added benefits for wireless operators wanting to
integrate WLANs with WWANs. Univity GGSN/PDSN will allow operators to identify
and manage subscribers, control traffic flows, and deliver a richer set of IP
data services. It will also provide enhanced protection of subscriber data
with security features such as 'state-aware' firewalls and strong encryption
algorithms.
In addition, Nortel Networks integrated WWAN/WLAN technology will use
industry standard IPSec encryption technology to help reduce enterprise
security concerns. Nortel Networks Contivity solution can also be used to
provide encryption, authentication, firewalls and routing in a single, secure
switch, and stops unauthorized users from hacking into the network to gain
free access and/or steal confidential information.


(END) DOW JONES NEWS 12-03-02
09:07 AM
End of News

[ 12-03-2002: Message edited by: Little Newton ]</p>
semper ubi sub ubi
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post #82 of 211
Yep <a href="http://www.t-mobile.com/hotspot/" target="_blank">T-Mobile</a> is rolling this out too. Hm, it seems that US wireless carriers are concerned about GPRS and 3G as being wireless broadband solutions.

Given what engpjp said, quote: [quote]The network will have three major components: Mac-to-other computers, Mac-to-fixed phones (the call is sent via a locally stationed computer), and Mac-to-SMS. The latter is more relevant in Europe, but only the countries that already have such a (non-Mac) service will be eligible.

These services will be tied in with the .mac package. Needless to say, using relevant software (faxSTF, etc), one can send faxes.

The Mac-to-Mac part will include voicemail, VoIP, and videophoning; however, all these things will probably introduced in several packages.<hr></blockquote>, perhaps iPhone is part of an umbrella scheme: VoIP perhaps via new Airport hubs, BT & iSync, and anywhere/anytime messaging.

The digital hub becomes the digital communications hub.

Screed ...my nipples explode with delight!

[ 12-03-2002: Message edited by: sCreeD ]</p>
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post #83 of 211
Here's a quote from an NY times article back in August about the possibility of an iPhone. Note that SJ grudgingly admitted that it would be a good idea.

[quote] Mr. Jobs continues to be coy. He insists that he still dislikes the idea of the conventional personal digital assistant, saying that the devices are too hard to use and offer little real utility. But a telephone with personal digital assistant features is another matter.

"We decided that between now and next year, the P.D.A. is going to be subsumed by the telephone," he said last week in an interview. "We think the P.D.A. is going away."

And even while protesting that the company had no plans to introduce such a device, he grudgingly acknowledged that combining some of Apple's industrial design and user-interface innovations would be a good idea in a device that performed both phone and computing functions
<hr></blockquote>

Here's a link to the complete article. <a href="http://www.nytimes.com/2002/08/19/technology/19APPL.html" target="_blank">NY Times</a>

Seems to me Steve was kinda miffed that the reporter was onto something real.
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post #84 of 211
[quote]Originally posted by Harald:
<strong>
GSM (used everywhere else from Madagascar to Manchester)</strong><hr></blockquote>

Right, but there's three different types of GSM: 0.9GHz, 1.8GHz and 1.9GHz - the latter of which is a completely different system to the other two, and is only in use in North America.
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post #85 of 211
[quote]Originally posted by othello:
<strong>we don't even get an Apple store!</strong><hr></blockquote>

Fsck that, we don't even get a localised OS!
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post #86 of 211
interesting to see how quickly this thread grew
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post #87 of 211
[quote]Originally posted by ast3r3x:
<strong>interesting to see how quickly this thread grew</strong><hr></blockquote>


yup

this is exciting

but I, of course, knew it all along...
<img src="graemlins/smokin.gif" border="0" alt="[Chilling]" /> <img src="graemlins/smokin.gif" border="0" alt="[Chilling]" /> <img src="graemlins/smokin.gif" border="0" alt="[Chilling]" /> <img src="graemlins/smokin.gif" border="0" alt="[Chilling]" />
post #88 of 211
[quote]Originally posted by Clive:
<strong>

Right, but there's three different types of GSM: 0.9GHz, 1.8GHz and 1.9GHz - the latter of which is a completely different system to the other two, and is only in use in North America.</strong><hr></blockquote>

Doesn't matter since most newer GSM phones are triband.
JLL

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JLL

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post #89 of 211
[quote]Originally posted by Clive:
<strong>

Right, but there's three different types of GSM: 0.9GHz, 1.8GHz and 1.9GHz - the latter of which is a completely different system to the other two, and is only in use in North America.</strong><hr></blockquote>

Yeah, but who cares? There are triband-chips in 60-70% of GSM phones sold nowadays anyway, plus, considering Apple's market, there's no way they'd introduce an iPhone that isn't a worldphone.

As a matter of fact, Nokia has been one of the first manufacturers to incorporate a new wireless chipset that actually supports all three GSM bands and CDMA/CDMA2000/WCDMA, I forget the chipsets' manufacturer's names but Apple could definitely use one of those as well, and that would be worth the extra money to be able to use the iPhone on the two different network technologies here in the U.S., I think. But even if it's just a separate little "card" you can place inside of the iPhone to switch between a CDMA iPhone and a GSM iPhone, I'm down with that. But for the CDMA, Apple would have to be working pretty closely with Sprint, Verizon, AT&T, and the like, because CDMA is a little more 'closed' as far as network technologies go.
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post #90 of 211
Jonathan has it right, methinks. Apple doesn't typically push the boundaries terribly far these days. The iApps are cool, but nowhere near the level of revolution which is being thrown around here.

This is iChat on steroids. It is definitely an iApp. Did you see the trademark description? "Communication by computer; communication between computers". My gut tells me this is the fabled videoconferencing application. I'm sure they've dreamed up some nifty little features to make it more compelling than CU-See Me. But I'll bet that's what it effectively is.

The idea of an Apple-branded cell phone operating system is the other compelling vision I've read here. But we all know Apple is about controling the whole widget. They're not about to start licensing out an OS. Besides, they've got their hands full with OS X. I don't see them pulling any resources away from that.

Don't get your hopes too high folks. Keep your expectations low and you'll be pleasantly surprised. Let the recent powerbook revisions be a lesson to us all in managed expectations.
post #91 of 211
[quote]Originally posted by JPF:
<strong>Also of note, the iPod was registered with this database on :

OCT 2, 2001

Apple introduced the iPod on :

OCT 23, 2001

Hmmmm.... are we set for MWSF or what?</strong><hr></blockquote>

more like a nice x-mas present
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post #92 of 211
[quote]Originally posted by Belle:
<strong>
Hmm, not going to happen. If I put this information into Photoshop, and apply a basic reality filter, we see the likelihood is that iPhone is a crappy collaboration and video conferencing tool available only to .Mac subscribers, that will also only talk to other .Mac subscribers.</strong><hr></blockquote>

Belle,

I may have been a little opague here. What I meant by "phone connectivity service" was not that Apple become a cellphone network company. "Phone" here signifies electrical dial-up voice communication. It includes, as already stated, voice communication from Mac to other computers, from Mac to wired phone via the Internet to a local computer/phone crossover point, and Mac to cellphones via SMS. A Mac will be able to receive VoIP calls (from other computers) and SMS. Plus webcam and faxing, as already described.

The crossover points will not be owned or handled by Apple.

engpjp

[ 12-04-2002: Message edited by: engpjp ]</p>
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post #93 of 211
[quote]Originally posted by eliahu:
<strong>This is iChat on steroids. It is definitely an iApp. Did you see the trademark description? "Communication by computer; communication between computers". My gut tells me this is the fabled videoconferencing application. I'm sure they've dreamed up some nifty little features to make it more compelling than CU-See Me. But I'll bet that's what it effectively is.</strong><hr></blockquote>

BUT also in that same TM is "creation and distribution of media for application in computer networks, cableless networks and worldwide communication networks; "

now that doesn't sound as lame as the iApp that you intonate does it. "cableless networks and worldwide communication networks" describes mobile telephony. a videoconferencing app would have to integrate with cableless networks somehow to warrant the TM.
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post #94 of 211
[quote]Originally posted by msantti:
<strong>Just what the world needs, another freakin cell phone.



</strong><hr></blockquote>

i wouldnt be so quick to lable this yet another cell phone..... im expecting a phone you can hook upto your computer via USB maybe and make calls to any other mac or computer or cell phone or phone in the world....via a ISP instead of dialing long distance. hence..'i' Phone. but i could be proven wrong. Also i thonk this will be a produt developed by Woz's company, but marketed by Apple (as apple being the sole buyer at this point in time)

I just hope Apple dosent decide to become a service provider for cell hones.... that would be disasterous.
post #95 of 211
This all sounds so cool!

Would be a nice First Mobil phone for me too

-Owl
post #96 of 211
[quote]Originally posted by Hawkeye_a:
<strong>

i wouldnt be so quick to lable this yet another cell phone..... im expecting a phone you can hook upto your computer via USB maybe and make calls to any other mac or computer or cell phone or phone in the world....via a ISP instead of dialing long distance. hence..'i' Phone. but i could be proven wrong. Also i thonk this will be a produt developed by Woz's company, but marketed by Apple (as apple being the sole buyer at this point in time)

I just hope Apple dosent decide to become a service provider for cell hones.... that would be disasterous.</strong><hr></blockquote>


USB!!?
USB?!?!?!?

Please sir, bluetooth, mind you <img src="graemlins/smokin.gif" border="0" alt="[Chilling]" /> <img src="graemlins/smokin.gif" border="0" alt="[Chilling]" /> <img src="graemlins/smokin.gif" border="0" alt="[Chilling]" />
post #97 of 211
My iPhone prediction:

Initial high consumption by Apple fanatics,

Too many problems with development and manufacture,

*FAILURE*

An MP3 player is one thing, a phone is a totally different animal.

As long as it doesn't have the Apple logo plastered all over it, I might give it a look over.

<img src="graemlins/smokin.gif" border="0" alt="[Chilling]" />
post #98 of 211
[quote]Originally posted by JLL:
<strong>Doesn't matter since most newer GSM phones are triband.</strong><hr></blockquote>

Many newer phones are dual band - few are tri-band (ref: 7 of 21 phone listed at the Orange UK site are tri-band).
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post #99 of 211
[quote]Originally posted by lungaretta:
<strong>

BUT also in that same TM is "creation and distribution of media for application in computer networks, cableless networks and worldwide communication networks; "

now that doesn't sound as lame as the iApp that you intonate does it. "cableless networks and worldwide communication networks" describes mobile telephony. a videoconferencing app would have to integrate with cableless networks somehow to warrant the TM.</strong><hr></blockquote>

Excellent point. However, "cableless networks and worldwide communication networks" could also be interpreted to mean the internet and 802.11b-type networks. Rendezvous?

The plot thickens...
post #100 of 211
I wonder if there would be any way to plug an attachment into the ipod to do any of this stuff. It could have its own battery.? Mabey?
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That's the biggest load of crap I've ever heard!
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post #101 of 211
[quote]Originally posted by Belle:
<strong>
You can get flight arrivals, maps, movie information, and language translation?! Please tell me you're not talking about WAP?

Also, isn't Vodafone a network rather than a cell phone hardware/software manufacturer?</strong><hr></blockquote>

Of course I'm talking about WAP. Does it matter which technology brings me flight arrivals, maps, movie information, restaurant info, directions, etc?

<img src="graemlins/hmmm.gif" border="0" alt="[Hmmm]" />

*I* don't care how it gets to me. I don't even really use it. I'm sure my kids will someday.

post #102 of 211
totally agree with ENGPJP.

iPhone is not hardware, it's a service.

to all of you who compared this story with the iPod thing: a pod is a housing, something compact (thanx to sherlook/american heritage dic) - and finally it was... a mp3 player!

a iphone is a phone? too simple.

what a bout vid conferencing? the mysterious hidden button in iChat? prob, an iPhone is just a lil' piece of hardware, a firewire webcam for 49.99$ incl a beast of iApp? we'll see on january
post #103 of 211
OK, after thought, here's my list of favourite possibilities (in order, and for what it's worth):

1) It's an iApp for video conferencing / VoIP for broadband users

2) It's a cheap widget for making the above cool

3) It's a handset

I'm managing my own expectations.
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post #104 of 211
[quote]Originally posted by Belle:
<strong>
Yes, I will. In 2010. But if you're expecting something like that from Apple, or anyone else, anytime soon, you'll be sadly disappointed. </strong><hr></blockquote>

Used to pst here but fogot my password

Anyway, The other day my housemate was doing a "battle of the sexes" competition via SMS. It goes like this: you send an SMS to a number with your name and sex (ie Matt M or Jill F). You are pitted against a random competitor of the opposite sex. You are then sent a question via SMS to which you type in the answer. You are then sent another qestion (5 in all) along with the message "congratulations you got that one right and Jill got it wrong". Once you have answered all the questions you are notified whether you have beaten or were beaten by your opposition and you can check the males vs females scores at a website.

The point to all this? Well, if you can send a text message to a computer with an answer, and if the computer can take that answer and access whether it is right or wrong, then is it not feasable that you could send an SMS to another computer and ask what time a movie was on at a particular cinema? ie Harry Potter 2, Southland. Or when a flight was touching down/taking off (QF101, landing). And it would be great if the phone could tell the SMS where you were so you could type in Harry Potter 2 and the computer would know you were near Southland and send you the details for those screenings (not sure how it works elsewhere but in Australia our mobile phones tell us which suburb/location we are in by getting the information from the tower we are using for access).

I'm not sure if this iPhone is hardware or software but I do know that the type of information you are looking to pass to a mobile phone is available, just that no one is really marketing it. With new phones using MMS now (t68i demoed at MW this year is one of them) you could send an SMS asking where the nearest cinema is from your location and have a map sent to you via MMS. No WAP needed just simple SMs that almost everyone uses every day (well, everyone I know anyway).

The mobile phone uptake in this country is unbelieveable!!! Every man and his dog has a mobile and use SMS all the time (the same housmate I mentioned above spends about AU$120 a month on his mobile and at least AU$50 of that is SMS @ AU$0.23 each). So, Apple (or anyone else with an interest) wouldn't need to do much to get these services running on a standard mobile phone. Just set up a number for people to send messages to asking for info, charge AU$0.10 (plus the carriers charges) per message and have the answers spat back via a computer (no per use charge to send SMS via computer) and you have a winner of a system. Only drawback is setting up a number in every country (or you could make it "free" by setting the number to send to a computer in the first place thus making the only charge the carriers fee).

Sherlock sucks ass if you live outside the States (I still can't find movie times in Melbourne via Sherlock although the flight schedules do work) so I hope if they do do this type of thing that it works worldwide from the get go.
post #105 of 211
Looks more and more like iPhone is an iApp. SJ hinted at a audio/video conferencing application and this seems to be it.
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post #106 of 211
[quote]Originally posted by bradbower:
<strong>Do not spooge pants.</strong><hr></blockquote>

Too late.

 

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“The nitrogen in our DNA, the calcium in our teeth, the iron in our blood, the carbon in our apple pies were made in the interiors of collapsing stars. We are made of starstuff.” 
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post #107 of 211
[quote]Originally posted by Nebagakid:
<strong>


USB!!?
USB?!?!?!?

Please sir, bluetooth, mind you <img src="graemlins/smokin.gif" border="0" alt="[Chilling]" /> <img src="graemlins/smokin.gif" border="0" alt="[Chilling]" /> <img src="graemlins/smokin.gif" border="0" alt="[Chilling]" /> </strong><hr></blockquote>
No my god man, Gigawire! Wireless Firewire! <img src="graemlins/smokin.gif" border="0" alt="[Chilling]" />


And on the other hand.. Im probably going to give my mom a new mobile phone in christmas present.. Maybe ill just give her my Nokia 6210, and by an iPhone for myself instead...

[quote]Originally posted by MacsRGood4U:
<strong>Looks more and more like iPhone is an iApp. SJ hinted at a audio/video conferencing application and this seems to be it.</strong><hr></blockquote>
Stupid name.. Should be iCam or iCommunicate or iSpeak or, or, or...

[ 12-04-2002: Message edited by: T'hain Esh Kelch ]</p>
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post #108 of 211
[quote]Originally posted by engpjp:
<strong>...from Mac to wired phone via the Internet to a local computer/phone crossover point, and Mac to cellphones via SMS...

The crossover points will not be owned or handled by Apple.</strong><hr></blockquote>
Sorry if I misunderstood. It was this stuff that confused me. Who would be responsible for handling the local exchanges? How would people be charged and networks paid for SMS messages? How do you envisage the "crossover points"?
[quote]Originally posted by MacLuv:
<strong>I don't even really use it.</strong><hr></blockquote>
Out of interest, why not? And I'm not really arguing the value of the technology, just the belief that Apple has anything like this ready to go anytime soon.
[quote]Originally posted by pooandwee:
<strong>The point to all this? Well, if you can send a text message to a computer with an answer, and if the computer can take that answer and access whether it is right or wrong, then is it not feasable that you could send an SMS to another computer and ask what time a movie was on at a particular cinema? ie Harry Potter 2, Southland. Or when a flight was touching down/taking off (QF101, landing). And it would be great if the phone could tell the SMS where you were so you could type in Harry Potter 2 and the computer would know you were near Southland and send you the details for those screenings (not sure how it works elsewhere but in Australia our mobile phones tell us which suburb/location we are in by getting the information from the tower we are using for access).</strong><hr></blockquote>
Nice name.

Oh, I realize all this is possible - I use several SMS services myself already. All I'm questioning is whether or not Apple has got all this stuff pulled together with some awesome GUI that's going to totally maul the various cell phone manufacturers, networks, and service providers that have been working on this for years.

People's expectations are much too high.

To quote somebody (step forward if you were responsible) when all the "Way beyond the rumors" stuff appeared before MWSF 2002:

Set your phasers to disappointment.

[ 12-04-2002: Message edited by: Belle ]</p>
Chicanery.
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Chicanery.
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post #109 of 211
Also at the UK Patent office'

Mark Text :

IPHONE


UK Case Status : Registered Community Trade Mark Date : 14.04.1998

Class : 09

Applicant : Cisco Systems, Inc.

<a href="http://webdb4.patent.gov.uk/cgi-bin/casablanca/cb_cgi?cb_dialogue=dlg_tmer85&detailsrequested=C&t rademark=E796268" target="_blank">UK Patent office</a>
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post #110 of 211
Some of you are setting yourself up for a BIG disappoinment. But hey, anticipation is the name of the game.
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post #111 of 211
<a href="http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/hw/phones/ps379/index.html" target="_blank">What do Cisco systems do exactly?</a>

Communications and network solutions. Telephones. And networking software intercommunimacations-type thingies too.

Does this have anything to do with the other patents at all? Even if it does, it doesn't decide whether it's app, handset or widget.

[ 12-04-2002: Message edited by: Hassan i Sabbah ]</p>
post #112 of 211
Could also be Apple protecting the name. It doesn't necessarily have a product yet to apply the name to.
Chicanery.
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Chicanery.
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post #113 of 211
If it were some sort of iApp for videoconferencing, what is the likelihood that Apple would take advantage of its hardware-software integration to build a cheap camera into one of its computer models?

Since the OS is Apple's, too, it would be interesting to speculate about possible OS-type tinkering that Apple might make to take advantage of a standardized camera. Essentially, you'd have a computer with an eye capable of visually interacting with its user. Voice recognition interfaces and dictation software aren't too useful to most of us, so it's quite likely that little would come of camera-based computer interface, but still fun to consider the possiblities. Some clever programming with adaptive pattern-recognition software (like I've read was done with the Apple mail filter) and there are a lot of possibilities. Examples: A line-of-sight-based mouse? Line-of-sight-based "scroll wheel" that anticipated your need for a "page turn"? Data mining software that reports to advertisers your facial expression upon seeing certain ads? Sign-language-based passwords?
post #114 of 211
[quote]Originally posted by MacsRGood4U:
<strong>Looks more and more like iPhone is an iApp. SJ hinted at a audio/video conferencing application and this seems to be it.</strong><hr></blockquote>

for me to be conviced this is an iApp/service and not hardware, i would really love to see similar trademark applications globally for iMovie/iTunes/iPhoto et al.

if these TM's do indeed exist then i guess i can hang my hopes up in the cupboard and forget about a new DLD from apple. on the other hand, if they don't exist, we know the TM for iPod was portent to a stunning hardware release....
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post #115 of 211


I just hacked into Apple.com and found this TOP SECRET spy photo of the soon to be released iPhone device. It looks so AMAZING. So High Tech!!! I really like the aire vents that double as the microphone. I bet it has a G5 in it. I cant wait to get my hands on it!!!!

<img src="graemlins/lol.gif" border="0" alt="[Laughing]" />
post #116 of 211
[quote]Originally posted by Krob81:
<strong>
I bet it has a G5 in it.</strong><hr></blockquote>

actually, that is a possibility given that the G5 is now an imbedded chip.

Didn't someone post earlier that a pixo OS had been bought for a phone-like device?
Dfn Eupfhoria: the joy of playing the 21st level of marathon.
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Dfn Eupfhoria: the joy of playing the 21st level of marathon.
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post #117 of 211
I was kidding, but I cant seem to understand why a G5 would be needed for the iphone unless the phone was some sort of mp3, video, photo, airport, cell phone......
post #118 of 211
yeah, apple had two patents/things from Pixo, one for iPod, and the other, it seems, for the iPhone.... the iPhone is not a video/audio conferencing app

that is what iChat will be, there are already images for it inside the program (it being video/audio conferencing)... they don't do anything...yet
post #119 of 211
[quote]Originally posted by Belle:
<strong>

Sorry if I misunderstood. It was this stuff that confused me. Who would be responsible for handling the local exchanges? How would people be charged and networks paid for SMS messages? How do you envisage the "crossover points"?</strong><hr></blockquote>

No, thanx for asking! Such services are already working, and for free. For instance, I can send an SMS from my Mac in Turkey to family members' mobile phones in Denmark. The service providers are most often phone companies that consider it a way to expand business: an SMS usually demands an answer - either a return SMS or a phone call. This might change if the use of the service takes off; for Apple, a later business model *could* include paying into an account via (say) PayPal, or using one of the projected "digital money" services (Micro Money?). Regarding the crossover points: as far as I understand, Apple is working on a model whereby the net of crossover points will be handled by phone companies and broadband providers. Again, this service can already be found; Apple will merely organize it and channel the fixed fee for the service via a special .mac extended membership.

engpjp
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<a href="http://macbloqs.blogspot.com/" target="_blank">MacBloQs</a> - like Apples with Teeth
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post #120 of 211
[quote]Originally posted by Nebagakid:
<strong>yeah, apple had two patents/things from Pixo, one for iPod, and the other, it seems, for the iPhone.... the iPhone is not a video/audio conferencing app

that is what iChat will be, there are already images for it inside the program (it being video/audio conferencing)... they don't do anything...yet</strong><hr></blockquote>

The second licence for using Pixo is not for a mobile phone.

The two icons in iChat are there in preparation for iChat's *integration* with iPhone, viz the integration between iChat, Mail, Address Book and others....

engpjp
<a href="http://macbloqs.blogspot.com/" target="_blank">MacBloQs</a> - like Apples with Teeth
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<a href="http://macbloqs.blogspot.com/" target="_blank">MacBloQs</a> - like Apples with Teeth
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