or Connect
AppleInsider › Forums › General › General Discussion › The Gray Davis Recall
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

The Gray Davis Recall

post #1 of 38
Thread Starter 
What is going to happen here? Will Arnold run? Would he win? Will Davis keep his job?

I think it depends on who runs. The Dems seem determined (now) to stand behind Davis, according to the DNC. My first thought is that if there is a strong Republican candidate, Davis will lose narrowly. If not, he may retain his job. That's not wishful thinking, before you go down that route.

Your thoughts....
I can only please one person per day.  Today is not your day.  Tomorrow doesn't look good either.  
Reply
I can only please one person per day.  Today is not your day.  Tomorrow doesn't look good either.  
Reply
post #2 of 38
I'm wondering: does anybody think that Schwarzenegger could win this thing if he really ran as the Republican candidate? I really wonder. Reagan was an actor too, but I'm thinking Schwarzy is another thing still. What are your thoughts here? Enlighten me, if you will.
post #3 of 38
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally posted by der Kopf
I'm wondering: does anybody think that Schwarzenegger could win this thing if he really ran as the Republican candidate? I really wonder. Reagan was an actor too, but I'm thinking Schwarzy is another thing still. What are your thoughts here? Enlighten me, if you will.

I think he would win. People have trouble separating fantasy from reality.

"I'll tour-mun-ate the budget deficit". I can hear it now.
I can only please one person per day.  Today is not your day.  Tomorrow doesn't look good either.  
Reply
I can only please one person per day.  Today is not your day.  Tomorrow doesn't look good either.  
Reply
post #4 of 38
This race is Arnold's to lose.
Steve Jobs ate my cat's watermelon @ drewprops.com
Oldest Member of AI (Jan 99) until JRC snaps to his senses and starts posting again. (the blackout borked my join date)
Reply
Steve Jobs ate my cat's watermelon @ drewprops.com
Oldest Member of AI (Jan 99) until JRC snaps to his senses and starts posting again. (the blackout borked my join date)
Reply
post #5 of 38
It's the greatest thing to happen in politics in years. Arianna Huffington, the former Republican, may be running against her ex-husband, the former heterosexual. What could be better than that?
post #6 of 38
Assuming he wants the job, it's Arnold's race if the rest of the GOP clears the field for him. That may not happen. In addition to Arnold other Republican hopefuls are Congressman Darrel Issa, GOP state senator Tom McClintock, former GOP gubernatorial candidate Bill Simon, former Los Angeles mayor Richard Riordan and I even read the other day that Jack Kemp is considering taking a shot at the job.
"Countless mothers will light candles and celebrate the tyrant's capture - mothers in all the cities of Iraq, in all the villages of Iran, in all the streets and quarters of Kuwait, everywhere the...
Reply
"Countless mothers will light candles and celebrate the tyrant's capture - mothers in all the cities of Iraq, in all the villages of Iran, in all the streets and quarters of Kuwait, everywhere the...
Reply
post #7 of 38
AHNULD VILL DESTLOY ZE OPPOSITION!!




Hell, other than the Ducks, Tahoe and Yosemite, it might be the only thing California has going for it. Can you imagine the new motorist self-preservation laws he'll pass?

"I believe everyone has ze light to carry glenade lawnchas in zeya cahs, in odah to plotect zemselves on our highways!"
Aldo is watching....
Reply
Aldo is watching....
Reply
post #8 of 38
the serious advanatage that arnold has over any other canidate is instant name recognition.

arnold may be able to do for California what Jesse Ventura did in Minnesota.

he brought out people who had never voted, but wanted to cast their ballot for a "real" man. a hero, someone that you'd be able to brag about if you met them. top that off with his being able to ride the success of T3, and i'd think he's the strongest repulican canidate.

add to that the fact that he has a drop dead gorgous wife, and it's a TV match made in heaven. the other thing is that Arnold seems to have been prepping for this for a while, although i'm sure he wasn't expecting it to happen the first year after the election. he'll never get a better shot.
post #9 of 38
I wonder if anyone in CA has actually bothered to check out AS's conservative credentials. Isn't he just more or less a fiscal conservative? I seem to remember that on just about everything else he's either moderate or even liberal (gun control, abortion, etc).

Cheers
Scott
Gangs are not seen as legitimate, because they don't have control over public schools.
Reply
Gangs are not seen as legitimate, because they don't have control over public schools.
Reply
post #10 of 38
Yeah Arnold is pretty socially liberal. I guess that is why he and Riordon are so closely linked. He is sort of a younger Riordon.

Arnold's only political action so far was that afterchool program bill which was a spending proposal. He does have great name recognition, but I think he would rather wait until he can get a full term. Even if a Republican wins it they could be ripe for a challenge in the primary next go around.

So far the last few Republican Governors from California have all been from Southern California and also been Pro-Choice Republicans.

Nick

"During times of universal deceit, telling the truth becomes a revolutionary act." -George Orwell

Reply

"During times of universal deceit, telling the truth becomes a revolutionary act." -George Orwell

Reply
post #11 of 38
Quote:
Originally posted by trumptman
Yeah Arnold is pretty socially liberal. I guess that is why he and Riordon are so closely linked. He is sort of a younger Riordon.

Arnold's only political action so far was that afterchool program bill which was a spending proposal. He does have great name recognition, but I think he would rather wait until he can get a full term. Even if a Republican wins it they could be ripe for a challenge in the primary next go around.

So far the last few Republican Governors from California have all been from Southern California and also been Pro-Choice Republicans.

Nick

That's what I thought. I just wonder if the folks in CA calling for him to be the state's savior know what they're in for if he DOES get elected gov.

Cheers
Scott
Gangs are not seen as legitimate, because they don't have control over public schools.
Reply
Gangs are not seen as legitimate, because they don't have control over public schools.
Reply
post #12 of 38
he can always ride on the "well, it was totally screwed up when i got here" defense. that would buy him at least two years.
post #13 of 38
originally posted by dewprops
Quote:
This race is Arnold's to lose.

They said the same thing about Jesse Ventura, he won with a hell of a margin if I remember correctly. Plus he kept a very high approval rating through out his term. Wasn't Ventura a Reform party candidate?

As for Arnold, hell I think I'd vote for the man to be president even though he isn't a natural born citizen. He could take the governors office easy.

(imagine Arnold at a summit with Putin, Blair, Chirac, Schroeder etc... )
"Beware the Jabberwock , my son! The jaws that bite, the claw that catch! Beware the Jubjub bird, and shun the the frumious Bandersnatch!"

from Jabberwocky, excerpt from Alice through the looking...
Reply
"Beware the Jabberwock , my son! The jaws that bite, the claw that catch! Beware the Jubjub bird, and shun the the frumious Bandersnatch!"

from Jabberwocky, excerpt from Alice through the looking...
Reply
post #14 of 38
The dotcom bubble bursting was not the fault of gray davis. The poorly handled deregulation of the energy industry was not the fault of gray davis. Being raped by Enron in a time of dire need is not the fault of gray davis. The out of control spending is partially the fault of gray davis for not vetoing enough bills.

So, the guy doesn't veto enough and happens to be in office while a whole bunch of shit he didn't make hits the fan. It's retarded to even attempt to recall him over it.

 

“The nitrogen in our DNA, the calcium in our teeth, the iron in our blood, the carbon in our apple pies were made in the interiors of collapsing stars. We are made of starstuff.” 
-Sagan
Reply

 

“The nitrogen in our DNA, the calcium in our teeth, the iron in our blood, the carbon in our apple pies were made in the interiors of collapsing stars. We are made of starstuff.” 
-Sagan
Reply
post #15 of 38
I wonder how many votes it takes to recall a President?
post #16 of 38
Originally posted by BRussell
Quote:
I wonder how many votes it takes to recall a President?

I believe 2/3rds majority of the House and the Senate??? Hasn't happened yet, the closest it probably ever came was Nixon, and he resigned before they could implement the impeachment process.
"Beware the Jabberwock , my son! The jaws that bite, the claw that catch! Beware the Jubjub bird, and shun the the frumious Bandersnatch!"

from Jabberwocky, excerpt from Alice through the looking...
Reply
"Beware the Jabberwock , my son! The jaws that bite, the claw that catch! Beware the Jubjub bird, and shun the the frumious Bandersnatch!"

from Jabberwocky, excerpt from Alice through the looking...
Reply
post #17 of 38
Quote:
Originally posted by BR
The dotcom bubble bursting was not the fault of gray davis.

No but spending like it never happened is...

Quote:
The poorly handled deregulation of the energy industry was not the fault of gray davis. Being raped by Enron in a time of dire need is not the fault of gray davis.

Davis flipped out. He signed expensive long term contracts and then later had to resell energy for pennies on the dollar. The reason we were at the mercy of outside forces is because of the "Not in my yard" mentality of many Californians who along with both Republican Governors and Democratic lawmakers had not approved a single new power plant in 10 years. Until the time of the blackouts Davis had followed the same pattern.

Likewise think about the fact that the blackouts were PLANNED. Doesn't that just raise a little suspicion? I mean I could understand if we were on the spot market and were unwilling to pay what was asked and thus plants were idled and we had brown/blackouts. However the blackouts were schedules and planned. Tomorrow at 12:00 pm these areas will have their power off. That to me means something is foul in Dodge City and it involves Davis as well.

Nick

"During times of universal deceit, telling the truth becomes a revolutionary act." -George Orwell

Reply

"During times of universal deceit, telling the truth becomes a revolutionary act." -George Orwell

Reply
post #18 of 38
Quote:
Originally posted by der Kopf
I'm wondering: does anybody think that Schwarzenegger could win this thing if he really ran as the Republican candidate? I really wonder. Reagan was an actor too, but I'm thinking Schwarzy is another thing still. What are your thoughts here? Enlighten me, if you will.

I hope he does not run. Who wants to inherit the mess?

Unless he runs on a ballot of secession. I always prat that CA and NY could remove themselves from the states.
Nov 98 - Earliest Registered User on record
Jan 02 - Earliest iPad prediction
Reply
Nov 98 - Earliest Registered User on record
Jan 02 - Earliest iPad prediction
Reply
post #19 of 38
Quote:
Originally posted by trumptman
No but spending like it never happened is...Nick

Did you read the rest of my post? He didn't veto enough bills but the spending isn't entirely the fault of gray davis. A HUGE chunk of the blame gets squarely put on the shoulders of the legislature...you know, the people that pass the laws authorizing the spending...

 

“The nitrogen in our DNA, the calcium in our teeth, the iron in our blood, the carbon in our apple pies were made in the interiors of collapsing stars. We are made of starstuff.” 
-Sagan
Reply

 

“The nitrogen in our DNA, the calcium in our teeth, the iron in our blood, the carbon in our apple pies were made in the interiors of collapsing stars. We are made of starstuff.” 
-Sagan
Reply
post #20 of 38
doesn't Cali have some huge percentage of theiir budget locked into education? my understanding was they passed laws saying they couldnt touch .edu dollars, and they've been screwed since.

i wonder if that means the kids will be smart enough to calculate out the intreest on $38 billion of debt.......
post #21 of 38
Quote:
Originally posted by alcimedes
doesn't Cali have some huge percentage of theiir budget locked into education? my understanding was they passed laws saying they couldnt touch .edu dollars, and they've been screwed since.

i wonder if that means the kids will be smart enough to calculate out the intreest on $38 billion of debt.......

California is mandated to spend a minimum of 40% of their budget on education if I recall correctly.

Nick

"During times of universal deceit, telling the truth becomes a revolutionary act." -George Orwell

Reply

"During times of universal deceit, telling the truth becomes a revolutionary act." -George Orwell

Reply
post #22 of 38
Quote:
Originally posted by alcimedes
doesn't Cali have some huge percentage of theiir budget locked into education? my understanding was they passed laws saying they couldnt touch .edu dollars, and they've been screwed since.

i wonder if that means the kids will be smart enough to calculate out the intreest on $38 billion of debt.......


I guess that's why my tuition just got a 20% hike
post #23 of 38
the fact is that illegal immigration has had a significant effect on public education, there are just way too many kids for public schools... if california (regardless of who is in office) figures out how to get around the issue without kicking out illegal immigrants, then the education and debt problem will be around for a long time... I say make driving tests mandatory on a yearly basis, driven and written, charge a little bit, have the money go solely to education... bam
post #24 of 38
Quote:
Originally posted by CDonG4
the fact is that illegal immigration has had a significant effect on public education, there are just way too many kids for public schools... if california (regardless of who is in office) figures out how to get around the issue without kicking out illegal immigrants, then the education and debt problem will be around for a long time... I say make driving tests mandatory on a yearly basis, driven and written, charge a little bit, have the money go solely to education... bam

Ooh, or control spending in other areas! Bam!

 

“The nitrogen in our DNA, the calcium in our teeth, the iron in our blood, the carbon in our apple pies were made in the interiors of collapsing stars. We are made of starstuff.” 
-Sagan
Reply

 

“The nitrogen in our DNA, the calcium in our teeth, the iron in our blood, the carbon in our apple pies were made in the interiors of collapsing stars. We are made of starstuff.” 
-Sagan
Reply
post #25 of 38
I never understood this. What does the state of california have to do with the energy system?
"I reject your reality and substitute it with my own" - President Bush
Reply
"I reject your reality and substitute it with my own" - President Bush
Reply
post #26 of 38
Quote:
Originally posted by Anders
I never understood this. What does the state of california have to do with the energy system?

A brief and not necessarily correct answer:
(I apologize for any inaccuracies and admit that I am writing this off the top of my head and did not do any supporting research. I also apologize in advance to those who believe I am sidetracking the thread, since this is a reply to a specific post rather than to the specific subject of the thread.)

The State of California had regulatory agencies to set the price that the energy distributors could charge.

Some years ago, Californians voted to deregulate the system and let market forces determine the cost of energy.

The deregulation was not complete and there were still restrictions on the energy distributors. For instance, they were prohibited from entering into long term contracts with the energy suppliers. Even during the "energy crisis", they were not able to secure long term contracts and had to buy energy at the spot price, while the state still limited the amount they could charge, and in some cases, the energy distributors were actually subsidizing the consumer. This is one of the factors that drove one of the companies, Pacific Gas and Electric, into bankruptcy. One question I have is that after PG and E went bankrupt and the state took over the procurement of power, one of the first things Governor Davis did was to secure long term contracts and stabilize the cost of power. This was the very thing he and the state had prohibited PG and E from doing and which was, I believe, a contributing factor to the crisis in which the state is now in, since the state used its billions of dollars in surplus to ensure that consumers could receive power at reasonable prices.

(I believe the state surplus was about 11 billion dollars at the time. It went from PG&E subsidizing energy costs to the state subsidizing the energy costs and exhausting a good part, if not all, or the state surplus.)

My criticism is not that the governor was unwise in making long term contracts, because he did that in the best interest in the citizens of the state to ensure they had access to power. The long term contracts minimized the manipulation of the energy market by the energy suppliers and contributed to "calling their bluff". Only after the situation had stabilized did we find out that much of the energy crisis was caused by the manipulation of the energy market and only in hindsight can we say that Governor Davis' long term contracts were a bad investment. I would fault the governor for squandering the state surplus only if it can be proven that he knew the market was being manipulated. (I do fault him for not allowing the local utilities to negotiate long term contracts. I would think that he would have been able to issue some sort of executive order to allow this, just as he could have eliminated MTBE from our gasoline by now - but that is another story.)

The failure of deregulation in California has other states concerned because they are also considering deregulation. However, deregulation in California was not implemented well because the state still controlled prices.

Is this what you were looking for, or did I not understand your question?

P.S. Did Stanford's tuition go up by 20% At the University of California and California State University, the Regents recently (last week?) voted a 30% increase in tuition. That is in addition to the 10% increase earlier this year. As a side note, the amount represented by that 30% increase is almost twice the total tuition cost I (or rather, my parents) paid for my freshman year at Berkeley 30 years ago ($212/quarter). The increase at CSU is $238/semester and the increase at UC is $1097 (per year, I assume).
post #27 of 38
Quote:
Originally posted by trumptman
Likewise think about the fact that the blackouts were PLANNED. Doesn't that just raise a little suspicion?

I don't think there was a conspiracy. The state could predict its expected load based on historical data. It knew there was a possibility that it could not meet the demand. There's a balance between letting everyone suffer unpredictably, or letting certain areas plan for an expected outage while guaranteeing as much as possible that all other areas would not be. And just because an area was scheduled for the rotating outage did not mean that it would lose power, regardless of whether sufficient energy was available. Some areas never lost power even though they were in an area scheduled for a contingency outage.
post #28 of 38
Quote:
Originally posted by Skipjack
I don't think there was a conspiracy. The state could predict its expected load based on historical data. It knew there was a possibility that it could not meet the demand. There's a balance between letting everyone suffer unpredictably, or letting certain areas plan for an expected outage while guaranteeing as much as possible that all other areas would not be. And just because an area was scheduled for the rotating outage did not mean that it would lose power, regardless of whether sufficient energy was available. Some areas never lost power even though they were in an area scheduled for a contingency outage.

If they could predict the demand they could also buy the electricity to cover it without worrying about the insane prices on the spot market as well.

Nick

"During times of universal deceit, telling the truth becomes a revolutionary act." -George Orwell

Reply

"During times of universal deceit, telling the truth becomes a revolutionary act." -George Orwell

Reply
post #29 of 38
Quote:
Originally posted by trumptman
If they could predict the demand they could also buy the electricity to cover it without worrying about the insane prices on the spot market as well.

Nick

Doesn't quite work that way. Can't build a plant overnight. Energy demand was unexpectedly high that summer and our plants weren't enough. After being blindsided by our stupidity in not building enough plants ten years ago, we examined what the new power needs were during that crisis and used THOSE NEW FIGURES to develop the rolling blackouts.

 

“The nitrogen in our DNA, the calcium in our teeth, the iron in our blood, the carbon in our apple pies were made in the interiors of collapsing stars. We are made of starstuff.” 
-Sagan
Reply

 

“The nitrogen in our DNA, the calcium in our teeth, the iron in our blood, the carbon in our apple pies were made in the interiors of collapsing stars. We are made of starstuff.” 
-Sagan
Reply
post #30 of 38
Quote:
Originally posted by BR
Doesn't quite work that way. Can't build a plant overnight. Energy demand was unexpectedly high that summer and our plants weren't enough. After being blindsided by our stupidity in not building enough plants ten years ago, we examined what the new power needs were during that crisis and used THOSE NEW FIGURES to develop the rolling blackouts.

You do know that California is 47-49th in per capita energy use right? You really can't use much less than we do and just about everyone strives to be efficient here. This was true before and after the blackouts. To me it just seems a bit too convenient that we "just happened" to use more energy that one summer and "just happened" to have to sign expensive long term contracts to fix it. Isn't it amazing that we haven't had a single blackout or issue since then. They still haven't fully rolled back deregulation.

I assure you that if Davis were named Bush the same people defending him would be screaming to high heaven about how suspicious and BS that sounds. Heck they blame Bush anyway and he hadn't even taken office yet. But don't blaim Davis when his signature is the one on the contracts.

I have no doubt some spot market manipulation occured. However it is just as likely that we sunk ourselves by having so few people capable of meeting our always unique demands that we add with "good intentions." We have laws saying we have to buy every watt of alternative power produced no matter the cost. We have laws that idle plants even during high demand because the pollution credits they have to purchase become too expensive, etc. The one constant in the middle of all this is Davis. He is thus blamed.

Nick

"During times of universal deceit, telling the truth becomes a revolutionary act." -George Orwell

Reply

"During times of universal deceit, telling the truth becomes a revolutionary act." -George Orwell

Reply
post #31 of 38
Quote:
Originally posted by trumptman
You do know that California is 47-49th in per capita energy use right? You really can't use much less than we do and just about everyone strives to be efficient here. This was true before and after the blackouts. To me it just seems a bit too convenient that we "just happened" to use more energy that one summer and "just happened" to have to sign expensive long term contracts to fix it. Isn't it amazing that we haven't had a single blackout or issue since then. They still haven't fully rolled back deregulation.

I assure you that if Davis were named Bush the same people defending him would be screaming to high heaven about how suspicious and BS that sounds. Nick

With the closing of old plants and not replacing them with new ones, it doesn't surprise me that we ran into problems a couple summers ago.

As far as not having a blackout since we signed the long-term contracts...umm, what the **** is weird about that? WE SIGNED LONG-TERM CONTRACTS. IT'S MONEY IN THE BANK OF THE ENERGY COMPANIES THAT RAPED US. IF THEY DON'T PROVIDE THE POWER, THEY DON'T GET THEIR MONEY.

Jesus man. You're really reaching on this. Stick to women raping men's bank accounts. That you actually know something about.

 

“The nitrogen in our DNA, the calcium in our teeth, the iron in our blood, the carbon in our apple pies were made in the interiors of collapsing stars. We are made of starstuff.” 
-Sagan
Reply

 

“The nitrogen in our DNA, the calcium in our teeth, the iron in our blood, the carbon in our apple pies were made in the interiors of collapsing stars. We are made of starstuff.” 
-Sagan
Reply
post #32 of 38
Quote:
Originally posted by BR
With the closing of old plants and not replacing them with new ones, it doesn't surprise me that we ran into problems a couple summers ago.

As far as not having a blackout since we signed the long-term contracts...umm, what the **** is weird about that? WE SIGNED LONG-TERM CONTRACTS. IT'S MONEY IN THE BANK OF THE ENERGY COMPANIES THAT RAPED US. IF THEY DON'T PROVIDE THE POWER, THEY DON'T GET THEIR MONEY.

Jesus man. You're really reaching on this. Stick to women raping men's bank accounts. That you actually know something about.

It's not reaching. BR you know for a fact if it were Bush signing these contracts, every friggin message would be Bush buddies benefit from Bush signing long term energy contracts. As I mentioned they say that anyway and Bush wasn't even involved.

Davis is a political whore. He took plenty of contributions from these companies. The if the actions are the same minus one name (Davis instead of Bush) then the darn conclusion is the same.


Follow the cash

Likewise if you wanted to stick it to greedy utility companies, why would you sign bills worth BILLIONS to bail them out?

Nick

"During times of universal deceit, telling the truth becomes a revolutionary act." -George Orwell

Reply

"During times of universal deceit, telling the truth becomes a revolutionary act." -George Orwell

Reply
post #33 of 38
Quote:
Originally posted by trumptman
It's not reaching. BR you know for a fact if it were Bush signing these contracts, every friggin message would be Bush buddies benefit from Bush signing long term energy contracts. As I mentioned they say that anyway and Bush wasn't even involved.

Davis is a political whore. He took plenty of contributions from these companies. The if the actions are the same minus one name (Davis instead of Bush) then the darn conclusion is the same.


Follow the cash

Likewise if you wanted to stick it to greedy utility companies, why would you sign bills worth BILLIONS to bail them out?

Nick

There is a slight difference in credibility between Bush and Davis. I don't like either but it is unfair to compare the two directly.

 

“The nitrogen in our DNA, the calcium in our teeth, the iron in our blood, the carbon in our apple pies were made in the interiors of collapsing stars. We are made of starstuff.” 
-Sagan
Reply

 

“The nitrogen in our DNA, the calcium in our teeth, the iron in our blood, the carbon in our apple pies were made in the interiors of collapsing stars. We are made of starstuff.” 
-Sagan
Reply
post #34 of 38
Quote:
Originally posted by trumptman
Likewise if you wanted to stick it to greedy utility companies, why would you sign bills worth BILLIONS to bail them out?

What other options are there?
What states are these companies operating out of?
Is the money guaranteed or only there upon delivery of goods?
"Hearing a corrupt CEO like Cheney denigrate Edwards for being a trial lawyer is like hearing a child molester complain how Larry Flint is a pervert." -johnq
Reply
"Hearing a corrupt CEO like Cheney denigrate Edwards for being a trial lawyer is like hearing a child molester complain how Larry Flint is a pervert." -johnq
Reply
post #35 of 38
Quote:
Originally posted by BR
There is a slight difference in credibility between Bush and Davis. I don't like either but it is unfair to compare the two directly.

Unfair how? Tell me when Davis has EVER had any credibility to squander? The guy has never been anything but a suit with a fake name, worse haircut and the ability to sell out to the highest bidder.


Bunge
Quote:
What other options are there?
What states are these companies operating out of?
Is the money guaranteed or only there upon delivery of goods?

From what I understand they operated out of California (like PG&E and SCE)and outside of California. As for the other options you cannot decry them being multinationals with billions in profits on one hand and then sign bills to bail them out to the tune of billions on the other and remain credible.

The contracts guarantee how much we will buy and at what price. Often California has had to sell the excess back at cents on the dollar.

Take a look at this report. I really don't care if it speaks badly about Bush and company because you already have your opinions of them. However the point is Davis seriously screwed this up and deserve real serious blame for it. He has been deceptive all along especially with regard to the state deficit. He needs to go.

Energy Crisis

Nick

"During times of universal deceit, telling the truth becomes a revolutionary act." -George Orwell

Reply

"During times of universal deceit, telling the truth becomes a revolutionary act." -George Orwell

Reply
post #36 of 38
Quote:
Originally posted by trumptman
If they could predict the demand they could also buy the electricity to cover it without worrying about the insane prices on the spot market as well.[/B]

Quote:
Originally posted by BR
Doesn't quite work that way. Can't build a plant overnight. Energy demand was unexpectedly high that summer and our plants weren't enough. After being blindsided by our stupidity in not building enough plants ten years ago, we examined what the new power needs were during that crisis and used THOSE NEW FIGURES to develop the rolling blackouts.

The mismanagement has been going on for a long time. Less than ten years ago there was an operating nuclear power plant in Sacramento, California. This plant was newer than the one operating in San Onofre. The plant was decommissioned for some reason like, "it wasn't being used to capacity and environmentally conscioius Northern California doesn't see the need to justify a nuclear power plant in the area".

(Note that power produced by nuclear power plants was not subject to the price gouging, which affected petroleum products and natural gas.)

Further back then that, there was a nuclear power plant planned near Bodega Bay, but it as never built. (Construction was started over 30 years ago. I know some of the pros and cons on that plant, but won't go into it now unless someone wants to hear the story. Otherwise, I have Physics homework to do.)
post #37 of 38
Good unbiased post SDW congrats.

Quote:
I think he would win. People have trouble separating fantasy from reality.

"I'll tour-mun-ate the budget deficit". I can hear it now.

Haha. "I need your jacket, and your bike." Will he wear sunglasses?

It's disturbing that people vote for actors. Though it is a sign of the times. People are fed up. Politicians can be bribed too easily, and are. Most people are removed from politics though, they don't understand them and don't seem to want to, yet they complain. It's like everyone's given up.
\


Quote:
add to that the fact that he has a drop dead gorgous wife

*barfs in mouth and swallows it*

She likes like a skeleton bro. Always has.

Quote:
arnold may be able to do for California what Jesse Ventura did in Minnesota.

Wear a pink boa?
"Overpopulation and climate change are serious shit." Gilsch
"I was really curious how they had managed such fine granularity of alienation." addabox
Reply
"Overpopulation and climate change are serious shit." Gilsch
"I was really curious how they had managed such fine granularity of alienation." addabox
Reply
post #38 of 38
Quote:
I guess that's why my tuition just got a 20% hike

I feel your pain.

Hey CDonG4 good to see you back. Will you be a CDonG5 next month.
"Overpopulation and climate change are serious shit." Gilsch
"I was really curious how they had managed such fine granularity of alienation." addabox
Reply
"Overpopulation and climate change are serious shit." Gilsch
"I was really curious how they had managed such fine granularity of alienation." addabox
Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: General Discussion
AppleInsider › Forums › General › General Discussion › The Gray Davis Recall