or Connect
AppleInsider › Forums › General › General Discussion › California bans soft drink sales in school
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

California bans soft drink sales in school - Page 3

post #81 of 162
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally posted by bunge
There's a difference between stopping sales and stopping usage. No one here wants to acknowledge it though. Lemmings.

Yeah, the difference is banning sales of soft drinks at a middle school is useless WRT the intentions of the law. Kids aren't going to get any thinner because they can't buy a Coke from the school for 6-7 hours a day. And since they can bring these drinks from home, it's even more useless.

So the state should implement the better idea. Ban soft drinks altogether, anywhere, for all ages. I mean, they want to combat obesity, right? Soft drinks are evil, right? The state knows what's best, right?
I can change my sig again!
Reply
I can change my sig again!
Reply
post #82 of 162
Quote:
Originally posted by Eugene
The state knows what's best, right?

Conversely, kids certainly don't know what's best.

Take soda machines out of schools across the nation.
Take fast food out of cafeterias.
Make P/E mandatory again.
Educate students about nutrition.
Support after-school activities.

It's all part of a score of things that schools can do to help reduce obesity. Removing soda machines from schools is going to make it harder for a kid to have a Coke with his/her lunch everyday unless his parents approve. Combined with other measures that the states should undertake.....it's a good thing overall that should see results.

Hopefully, healthy eating habits established during childhood will remain during adulthood.

Or the 1-Step Eugene approach:

A coke everyday for 180 days for 6 years....that's 500-1000 cokes, bud.

You'd sell more than a few diet books.
post #83 of 162
Quote:
Originally posted by Eugene
Kids aren't going to get any thinner because they can't buy a Coke from the school for 6-7 hours a day.

They're not going to get any fatter because of it either.
"Hearing a corrupt CEO like Cheney denigrate Edwards for being a trial lawyer is like hearing a child molester complain how Larry Flint is a pervert." -johnq
Reply
"Hearing a corrupt CEO like Cheney denigrate Edwards for being a trial lawyer is like hearing a child molester complain how Larry Flint is a pervert." -johnq
Reply
post #84 of 162
So, we're talking about setting the menu for school kid's meals. Based on this, Fellowship has two posts in the thread, both comparing it to Nazism, and Eugene thinks it is major government level prohibition, and they ought to just make sugar illegal then.

"FIRST THEY'RE GOING TO STOP SELLING COKES IN SCHOOLS, NEXT, IT'S DEATH CAMPS!!!!"

Some of you folks have an active imagination. That's good. It means you're well into the pre-operational stage of cognitive development.
post #85 of 162
Most soda is jammed packed with aspartame (aka Nutrasweet).
This stuff is poisonous by any definition, and to encourage its consumption by kids via soft drinks vending machines in schools is terminally wrong. This ban by California can only be good.

Anyone want to read this? Chances are, you would never want to go anywhere near a product containing Nutrasweet again.

try this one also
"We've never made the case, or argued the case that somehow Osama bin Laden was directly involved in 9/11. That evidence has never been forthcoming". VP Cheney, 3/29/2006. Interview by Tony Snow
Reply
"We've never made the case, or argued the case that somehow Osama bin Laden was directly involved in 9/11. That evidence has never been forthcoming". VP Cheney, 3/29/2006. Interview by Tony Snow
Reply
post #86 of 162
Quote:
Originally posted by Eugene
Yeah, the difference is banning sales of soft drinks at a middle school is useless WRT the intentions of the law. Kids aren't going to get any thinner because they can't buy a Coke from the school for 6-7 hours a day. And since they can bring these drinks from home, it's even more useless.

So the state should implement the better idea. Ban soft drinks altogether, anywhere, for all ages. I mean, they want to combat obesity, right? Soft drinks are evil, right? The state knows what's best, right?

I am no fan of official interference by government into the private affairs of people...but if the (longterm) health of children is at risk because the soft drinks industry has the lobbying power and $$ bribes to push their products in places of learning, then it is for the public good to remove these corporate privileges.

What is the most important, Eugene? The health and welfare of America's kids, or the bottom lines of junk food corporations who prey on kids who have no idea what's good or bad for their health? (Ignorant parents are equally to blame as well).

http://www.apa.org/science/ed-brownell.html
"We've never made the case, or argued the case that somehow Osama bin Laden was directly involved in 9/11. That evidence has never been forthcoming". VP Cheney, 3/29/2006. Interview by Tony Snow
Reply
"We've never made the case, or argued the case that somehow Osama bin Laden was directly involved in 9/11. That evidence has never been forthcoming". VP Cheney, 3/29/2006. Interview by Tony Snow
Reply
post #87 of 162
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally posted by sammi jo
I am no fan of official interference by government into the private affairs of people...but if the (longterm) health of children is at risk because the soft drinks industry has the lobbying power and $$ bribes to push their products in places of learning, then it is for the public good to remove these corporate privileges.

What is the most important, Eugene? The health and welfare of America's kids, or the bottom lines of junk food corporations who prey on kids who have no idea what's good or bad for their health? (Ignorant parents are equally to blame as well).

http://www.apa.org/science/ed-brownell.html

Jesus Christ. This is about the soft drink bill, not the corporate contract bill. The two are not inherently linked. The article chose to mix discussion of both into one piece, but they are separate bills and should be treated that way.

So who's with me for starting an underground soft drink distribution network? A secret society of Pepsi peddlers. Speakeasies were very profitable...
I can change my sig again!
Reply
I can change my sig again!
Reply
post #88 of 162
Holy Christ what's wrong with you people? Has your slavish devotion to free market correctness made you just plain stupid? We're talking about marketing to children. A captive audience of children. By corporations intent on engendering brand loyalty from as early an age as possible, and willing to spend as much money as necessary to see to it. If you think that characterization is just some "liberal" folk-lore, you're really really not paying attention. A state-wide ban is intended to act as a corrective to the money dangled in front of school districts. All this ranting about the slippery slope of government control is insulting nonsense. I have far more concern about the tender affections of a corporate climate that increasingly targets children directly-- corporations have a lot more money than the government and no moral structure what-so-ever beyond profit. The notion that it is hypocritical to not just ban soda outright, since adults are overweight too, seems like a line of reasoning from another planet. So our children require no special protections? I guess if "the government" says I can't have sex with a five year old they should just ban sex outright? How about smokes? Alchohol? Jeeze, there's money to be made in this underserved market, where the hell do those damn bureaucrats get off with their totalitarian thought control?! Yes, I know I haven't posted much and this is bit contentious for a start, but l draw the line when people start cheer-leading for selling my kids to greed-head m*therf*ckers in the name of some f*cked-up notion of "liberty".
They spoke of the sayings and doings of their commander, the grand duke, and told stories of his kindness and irascibility.
Reply
They spoke of the sayings and doings of their commander, the grand duke, and told stories of his kindness and irascibility.
Reply
post #89 of 162
What an excellent post.
post #90 of 162
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally posted by addabox
A state-wide ban is intended to act as a corrective to the money dangled in front of school districts.

There's a bill that deals specifically with the money-dangling phenomenon.

The bill that is the topic of this thread is not the same. I've already told the usual suspects this. Why do I have to say it again? Severely limiting the school board's ability to negotiate corporate contracts with companies like PepsiCo and Coca-Cola is a viable solution... that's not the bill I'm against.

It's still an issue that can be dealt with locally, especially if school districts do suddenly find it harder to make backroom deals with corporate types. That's what PTAs and school boards are for, right?

The Corporate America vs The Little People argument is a tangent. It deserves its own thread.
I can change my sig again!
Reply
I can change my sig again!
Reply
post #91 of 162
Quote:
Holy Christ what's wrong with you people? Has your slavish devotion to free market correctness made you just plain stupid? We're talking about marketing to children. A captive audience of children. By corporations intent on engendering brand loyalty from as early an age as possible, and willing to spend as much money as necessary to see to it. If you think that characterization is just some "liberal" folk-lore, you're really really not paying attention. A state-wide ban is intended to act as a corrective to the money dangled in front of school districts. All this ranting about the slippery slope of government control is insulting nonsense. I have far more concern about the tender affections of a corporate climate that increasingly targets children directly-- corporations have a lot more money than the government and no moral structure what-so-ever beyond profit. The notion that it is hypocritical to not just ban soda outright, since adults are overweight too, seems like a line of reasoning from another planet. So our children require no special protections? I guess if "the government" says I can't have sex with a five year old they should just ban sex outright? How about smokes? Alchohol? Jeeze, there's money to be made in this underserved market, where the hell do those damn bureaucrats get off with their totalitarian thought control?! Yes, I know I haven't posted much and this is bit contentious for a start, but l draw the line when people start cheer-leading for selling my kids to greed-head m*therf*ckers in the name of some f*cked-up notion of "liberty".



Best post in this thread period.

The real question is WHY do schools have to even consider deals with Coke, pepsi, and Doritos Inc.

Could it be related to the fact that too many of our teachers are currently paying for supplies out of their own underpaid pocket? Hmm....

The LOCAL schools were not doing there job.

Thank Christ, Allah and the Easter Bunny our government is doing something about it. Because later in life its going to cost us all (you, me, health ins. companies, the goverment.) and something tells me Doritos Inc will not be around with health ins. certificates for "diabetic dan" or "obesse oliver"


Geezus, of all the things in life to start a pissed off thread over...I hope all of you who complained about "Big State" moving in, count your blessings at night.


post #92 of 162
Thread Starter 
Incorrect. The schools here WERE doing the job, as many major school districts had implemented their own local plans. Not Unlike Myself already mentioned this, and he thinks the bill is a good idea. If the local schools were doing the right thing, why does it need to be a state law? If it's all about backroom deals, why doesn't this particular bill deal with them...AT ALL?
I can change my sig again!
Reply
I can change my sig again!
Reply
post #93 of 162
I mourn the death of personal responsibility. Thank you to those so-called liberals who killed it.

 

“The nitrogen in our DNA, the calcium in our teeth, the iron in our blood, the carbon in our apple pies were made in the interiors of collapsing stars. We are made of starstuff.” 
-Sagan
Reply

 

“The nitrogen in our DNA, the calcium in our teeth, the iron in our blood, the carbon in our apple pies were made in the interiors of collapsing stars. We are made of starstuff.” 
-Sagan
Reply
post #94 of 162
Quote:
Originally posted by BR
I mourn the death of personal responsibility. Thank you to those so-called liberals who killed it.

KIDS DON'T KNOW "PERSONAL RESPONSIBILITY."

For crying out loud, we're talking about kids here who usually can't make informed decisions about nutrition. Like I said, the ban on soda sales in schools puts the decision back into parents' hands so they can all be responsible for the fattening of their children. Not just the parents of certain school districts in California but all of them.

Man, I grew up on Juicy Juice, ice water, and milk/chocolate milk in Pennsylvania. Where's the responsibility not to install these soda machines in schools in the first place? Come on, br.
post #95 of 162
Quote:
Originally posted by ShawnJ
KIDS DON'T KNOW "PERSONAL RESPONSIBILITY."

For crying out loud, we're talking about kids here who usually can't make informed decisions about nutrition. Like I said, the ban on soda sales in schools puts the decision back into parents' hands so they can all be responsible for the fattening of their children. Not just the parents of certain school districts in California but all of them.

Man, I grew up on Juicy Juice, ice water, and milk/chocolate milk in Pennsylvania. Where's the responsibility not to install these soda machines in schools in the first place? Come on, br.

Parents. 'Nuff said.

 

“The nitrogen in our DNA, the calcium in our teeth, the iron in our blood, the carbon in our apple pies were made in the interiors of collapsing stars. We are made of starstuff.” 
-Sagan
Reply

 

“The nitrogen in our DNA, the calcium in our teeth, the iron in our blood, the carbon in our apple pies were made in the interiors of collapsing stars. We are made of starstuff.” 
-Sagan
Reply
post #96 of 162
Quote:
Originally posted by BR
Parents. 'Nuff said.

Parents can send their kids to school with soda. So, you're wrong?
"Hearing a corrupt CEO like Cheney denigrate Edwards for being a trial lawyer is like hearing a child molester complain how Larry Flint is a pervert." -johnq
Reply
"Hearing a corrupt CEO like Cheney denigrate Edwards for being a trial lawyer is like hearing a child molester complain how Larry Flint is a pervert." -johnq
Reply
post #97 of 162
Quote:
Originally posted by ShawnJ
Conversely, kids certainly don't know what's best.

Take soda machines out of schools across the nation.
Take fast food out of cafeterias.
Make P/E mandatory again.
Educate students about nutrition.
Support after-school activities.

It's all part of a score of things that schools can do to help reduce obesity. Removing soda machines from schools is going to make it harder for a kid to have a Coke with his/her lunch everyday unless his parents approve. Combined with other measures that the states should undertake.....it's a good thing overall that should see results.

Hopefully, healthy eating habits established during childhood will remain during adulthood.

Shawn,

You make some good points, and I do think they might be effective. However what would you say to those who have advocated this sort of comprehensive approach for drug users and cigarette users?

Obviously some things have worked, like drunk driving is much lower nowadays than in the past. However illegal drug use is likely no lower and cigarette smoking rates while falling for a long time seem to have stablized right in the 25-28% range.

I only say this because these parent DO approve of a tremendous amount of fatty food. They also overwhelmingly endorse a huge amount of prepackaged foods which are, even if they are healthy choices, not nearly as healthy as they would be when not mass produced.

So even if all the kid has is crackers, they are in an individually wrapped package with peanut butter or processed cheese food substitute and likely the worst nutritional crackers you can create.

I just wonder how effective these measures will be when school is such a small part of the choice. Even when the schools provide the lunches and breakfasts, they are often of poor nutritional value and when the children can make choices within those lunches they make poor choices.

For example I could take a photograph of the huge pile of apples, oranges left by the students each day. Meanwhile they bring full size BAG OF CHIPS to snack on. I'm not talking the .59, or .99 bag, I'm talking the FAMILY SIZE bag.


Nick

"During times of universal deceit, telling the truth becomes a revolutionary act." -George Orwell

Reply

"During times of universal deceit, telling the truth becomes a revolutionary act." -George Orwell

Reply
post #98 of 162
Quote:
Originally posted by trumptman
I only say this because these parent DO approve of a tremendous amount of fatty food. They also overwhelmingly endorse a huge amount of prepackaged foods which are, even if they are healthy choices, not nearly as healthy as they would be when not mass produced.

Do you think that parents of kids at schools that had pop machines relied on these machines? Like, did the parents give their kids some coins so they could buy pop with lunch? I'm just thinking that if so, banning the machines at school is a first step to getting a message out. When the parents realize they can no longer just give their kids money they'll probably also find out why.

Now, those parents that don't already know pop is bad probably won't learn anyway. But still, the kids will be better off growing up 8 hours a day in an environment where they have to go get a drink of water when they're thirsty. That's a good habit to ingrain in the kids.
"Hearing a corrupt CEO like Cheney denigrate Edwards for being a trial lawyer is like hearing a child molester complain how Larry Flint is a pervert." -johnq
Reply
"Hearing a corrupt CEO like Cheney denigrate Edwards for being a trial lawyer is like hearing a child molester complain how Larry Flint is a pervert." -johnq
Reply
post #99 of 162
Quote:
Originally posted by bunge
Do you think that parents of kids at schools that had pop machines relied on these machines? Like, did the parents give their kids some coins so they could buy pop with lunch? I'm just thinking that if so, banning the machines at school is a first step to getting a message out. When the parents realize they can no longer just give their kids money they'll probably also find out why.

Now, those parents that don't already know pop is bad probably won't learn anyway. But still, the kids will be better off growing up 8 hours a day in an environment where they have to go get a drink of water when they're thirsty. That's a good habit to ingrain in the kids.

I understand that but I also know that others here have advocated suing "Big Fat" and restricting advertising not just in school, but in society.

I certainly don't mind schools avoiding soft drink contracts and things of that nature. I'm just saying that when you are working against a societal trend it is like sticking a finger in the dike. If they are fine with the finger that is okay with me, but they should be honest and admit to more if for them, that is just the start.

I would bet that a small percentage of unhealthy food is actually sold by the schools. The kids bring the majority of it from home, or buy it on the way to school at stores.

Have you considered that route for example? Many of these students walk to school and simply spend their lunch money on the way there. That is why lunch consists of a large 20 oz soda and a bag of chips.

Also what determines healthy? If the schools is selling burritos for lunch, are those healthy? Are the twinkies obviously unhealthy, but what about the chocolate covered granola bar?

Nick

"During times of universal deceit, telling the truth becomes a revolutionary act." -George Orwell

Reply

"During times of universal deceit, telling the truth becomes a revolutionary act." -George Orwell

Reply
post #100 of 162
Quote:
Originally posted by trumptman
I understand that but I also know that others here have advocated suing "Big Fat" and restricting advertising not just in school, but in society.

I certainly don't mind schools avoiding soft drink contracts and things of that nature. I'm just saying that when you are working against a societal trend it is like sticking a finger in the dike. If they are fine with the finger that is okay with me, but they should be honest and admit to more if for them, that is just the start.

I would bet that a small percentage of unhealthy food is actually sold by the schools. The kids bring the majority of it from home, or buy it on the way to school at stores.

Have you considered that route for example? Many of these students walk to school and simply spend their lunch money on the way there. That is why lunch consists of a large 20 oz soda and a bag of chips.

Also what determines healthy? If the schools is selling burritos for lunch, are those healthy? Are the twinkies obviously unhealthy, but what about the chocolate covered granola bar?

Nick

You've never been to my school.

They sell 5 types of ice cream, TONS of pizza daily, and a lot of popcorn. They sell sodas, too.

There is a large(for a town of 28,000) shopping center right next to the school, though, but I think that kids mostly bring Starbucks and Jamba Juice to school from there.

OT: My school has ads up for Dumb and Dumberer and Neopets.
post #101 of 162
Quote:
Originally posted by bunge
Parents can send their kids to school with soda. So, you're wrong?

What's with the smug arrogant hostility from you lately?

The ban is dumb. It's knee-jerk reactive and not well thought out. My sister is in high school still. She saw her soda machines ripped out and replaced with candy machines and dispensers of other non-carbonated sugarwater drinks.

So, bunge, should stores stop selling sodas to minors? Should fast food restaraunts stop selling food to minors? If any kid can just walk into a store or restaurant and order an EVIL soda and a EVIL hamburger, it denies parents the right to personal responsibility, allowing their kids to circumvent their controls.

 

“The nitrogen in our DNA, the calcium in our teeth, the iron in our blood, the carbon in our apple pies were made in the interiors of collapsing stars. We are made of starstuff.” 
-Sagan
Reply

 

“The nitrogen in our DNA, the calcium in our teeth, the iron in our blood, the carbon in our apple pies were made in the interiors of collapsing stars. We are made of starstuff.” 
-Sagan
Reply
post #102 of 162
Quote:
Originally posted by BR
What's with the smug arrogant hostility from you lately?

My apologies. I was just attempting to fight fire with fire. I should just stick with arguments.

Quote:
Originally posted by BR
So, bunge, should stores stop selling sodas to minors? Should fast food restaraunts stop selling food to minors? If any kid can just walk into a store or restaurant and order an EVIL soda and a EVIL hamburger, it denies parents the right to personal responsibility, allowing their kids to circumvent their controls.

No. Should people be allowed to buy alcohol in a church? Like churches, schools should promote what they believe. That being a good education, an accurate history, etc. If they're in the business of selling food as well, they should promote good healthy foods. Schools shouldn't be in the business of making money. That should be last on the list of priorities.

The other places you mention are in the business of making money. Let them make their money. Schools have no business being a business.

PS Any posts I've made outside of AO have actually been sarcastic. I knew as I was making them there was a chance you wouldn't see them in that light, but others in the thread would. I was just poking fun at your signature.
"Hearing a corrupt CEO like Cheney denigrate Edwards for being a trial lawyer is like hearing a child molester complain how Larry Flint is a pervert." -johnq
Reply
"Hearing a corrupt CEO like Cheney denigrate Edwards for being a trial lawyer is like hearing a child molester complain how Larry Flint is a pervert." -johnq
Reply
post #103 of 162
Quote:
Originally posted by BR
What's with the smug arrogant hostility from you lately?

The ban is dumb. It's knee-jerk reactive and not well thought out. My sister is in high school still. She saw her soda machines ripped out and replaced with candy machines and dispensers of other non-carbonated sugarwater drinks.

So, bunge, should stores stop selling sodas to minors? Should fast food restaraunts stop selling food to minors? If any kid can just walk into a store or restaurant and order an EVIL soda and a EVIL hamburger, it denies parents the right to personal responsibility, allowing their kids to circumvent their controls.

Your logic is just atrocious here.

SCHOOLS = STORES

Wonderful.

Anyone want to comment on that?

But you're definitely right in that the ban will not be implemented very well. Schools can just bring in a sponsor like Snapple to sell drinks with even more sugar. So what do we do? I think banning the sale of soda is a good first step- now let's eliminate the sale of drinks that are just as bad.
post #104 of 162
Quote:
Originally posted by ShawnJ
Your logic is just atrocious here.

SCHOOLS = STORES

Wonderful.

Anyone want to comment on that?

But you're definitely right in that the ban will not be implemented very well. Schools can just bring in a sponsor like Snapple to sell drinks with even more sugar. So what do we do? I think banning the sale of soda is a good first step- now let's eliminate the sale of drinks that are just as bad.

Targeting soda is dumb. It is a horrible first step because there will not be a second step. If water was the only bottled drink sold in schools, then I might agree to it. MIGHT.

 

“The nitrogen in our DNA, the calcium in our teeth, the iron in our blood, the carbon in our apple pies were made in the interiors of collapsing stars. We are made of starstuff.” 
-Sagan
Reply

 

“The nitrogen in our DNA, the calcium in our teeth, the iron in our blood, the carbon in our apple pies were made in the interiors of collapsing stars. We are made of starstuff.” 
-Sagan
Reply
post #105 of 162
Quote:
Originally posted by bunge
My apologies. I was just attempting to fight fire with fire. I should just stick with arguments.



No. Should people be allowed to buy alcohol in a church? Like churches, schools should promote what they believe. That being a good education, an accurate history, etc. If they're in the business of selling food as well, they should promote good healthy foods. Schools shouldn't be in the business of making money. That should be last on the list of priorities.

The other places you mention are in the business of making money. Let them make their money. Schools have no business being a business.

PS Any posts I've made outside of AO have actually been sarcastic. I knew as I was making them there was a chance you wouldn't see them in that light, but others in the thread would. I was just poking fun at your signature.

Certain "unsavory" businesses aren't allowed to operate within a certain distance of schools and churches. Do you also suggest there be a similar no-soda-zone?

 

“The nitrogen in our DNA, the calcium in our teeth, the iron in our blood, the carbon in our apple pies were made in the interiors of collapsing stars. We are made of starstuff.” 
-Sagan
Reply

 

“The nitrogen in our DNA, the calcium in our teeth, the iron in our blood, the carbon in our apple pies were made in the interiors of collapsing stars. We are made of starstuff.” 
-Sagan
Reply
post #106 of 162
Quote:
Originally posted by BR
Certain "unsavory" businesses aren't allowed to operate within a certain distance of schools and churches. Do you also suggest there be a similar no-soda-zone?

No, it's the proprietor that's being corrected here. Schools have no business being a business, including soda. They shouldn't be effected by the market in terms of what they offer. They should do what's right, and soda is not right.

If crap replaces soda, then it'll all be for naught. Snapple is crap. Gatorade is crap. Water is good. 100% juice is good.
"Hearing a corrupt CEO like Cheney denigrate Edwards for being a trial lawyer is like hearing a child molester complain how Larry Flint is a pervert." -johnq
Reply
"Hearing a corrupt CEO like Cheney denigrate Edwards for being a trial lawyer is like hearing a child molester complain how Larry Flint is a pervert." -johnq
Reply
post #107 of 162
Quote:
Originally posted by audiopollution
One day you'll thank your parents for sending you to a reform school.

Seriously, though, what kind of sadistic school did you attend?

http://nccsc.k12.in.us/chs/

And I look back appreciatively, now.

My kids just started school and I was shocked to find they wear shorts.

Plus, the fast food marketing at the school surprised me as well.
Nov 98 - Earliest Registered User on record
Jan 02 - Earliest iPad prediction
Reply
Nov 98 - Earliest Registered User on record
Jan 02 - Earliest iPad prediction
Reply
post #108 of 162
There will be a couple of enterprising kids who make a killing off this at each school.
"Many people would sooner die than think; in fact, they do so." - Bertrand Russell
Reply
"Many people would sooner die than think; in fact, they do so." - Bertrand Russell
Reply
post #109 of 162
Quote:
Originally posted by JRC
Plus, the fast food marketing at the school surprised me as well.

I've never heard of fast food marketing at schools, but why shouldn't those responsible get put in jail?
"Hearing a corrupt CEO like Cheney denigrate Edwards for being a trial lawyer is like hearing a child molester complain how Larry Flint is a pervert." -johnq
Reply
"Hearing a corrupt CEO like Cheney denigrate Edwards for being a trial lawyer is like hearing a child molester complain how Larry Flint is a pervert." -johnq
Reply
post #110 of 162
Quote:
Originally posted by bunge
No, it's the proprietor that's being corrected here. Schools have no business being a business, including soda. They shouldn't be effected by the market in terms of what they offer. They should do what's right, and soda is not right.

If crap replaces soda, then it'll all be for naught. Snapple is crap. Gatorade is crap. Water is good. 100% juice is good.

When they are underfunded, they have every right to be a business.

 

“The nitrogen in our DNA, the calcium in our teeth, the iron in our blood, the carbon in our apple pies were made in the interiors of collapsing stars. We are made of starstuff.” 
-Sagan
Reply

 

“The nitrogen in our DNA, the calcium in our teeth, the iron in our blood, the carbon in our apple pies were made in the interiors of collapsing stars. We are made of starstuff.” 
-Sagan
Reply
post #111 of 162
Quote:
Originally posted by BR
When they are underfunded, they have every right to be a business.

'Every right'? That's extreme. Does that mean if they're underfunded Dow can pay to have a new version of the Bhopal accident put in the history books? If not, why not? They're a business and they're in the business of selling for profit, not educating.

How about saying you feel like they should?

I would say that a school can't be a business, and it interferes with their goal to be an instution of learning and as such, would be the exact opposite of 'every right.'
"Hearing a corrupt CEO like Cheney denigrate Edwards for being a trial lawyer is like hearing a child molester complain how Larry Flint is a pervert." -johnq
Reply
"Hearing a corrupt CEO like Cheney denigrate Edwards for being a trial lawyer is like hearing a child molester complain how Larry Flint is a pervert." -johnq
Reply
post #112 of 162
Quote:
Originally posted by bunge
'Every right'? That's extreme. Does that mean if they're underfunded Dow can pay to have a new version of the Bhopal accident put in the history books? If not, why not? They're a business and they're in the business of selling for profit, not educating.

How about saying you feel like they should?

I would say that a school can't be a business, and it interferes with their goal to be an instution of learning and as such, would be the exact opposite of 'every right.'

The Dow is not in the business of educating our children. Bringing up the Bhopal accident is not only silly, inflammatory, and irrelevant, but it is also insulting the intelligence of everyone who posts here.

Schools need to be run MORE like businesses, not less. Factors like return on investment MUST be considered. Appropriately dividing a scarcity of resources (money and good teachers) requires a business attitude, not a hippy dippy huggy socialist welfare state attitude. Acquiring more resources so that the scarcity is less of an impact is very important. The goal of passing on knowledge to the next generation that will eventually be running the country does not exclude corporate sponsorship of schools. Nay, it demands it.

And dammit we need to rethink where we focus our resources. Retards should not be the priority. The return on investment simply is non-existant.

 

“The nitrogen in our DNA, the calcium in our teeth, the iron in our blood, the carbon in our apple pies were made in the interiors of collapsing stars. We are made of starstuff.” 
-Sagan
Reply

 

“The nitrogen in our DNA, the calcium in our teeth, the iron in our blood, the carbon in our apple pies were made in the interiors of collapsing stars. We are made of starstuff.” 
-Sagan
Reply
post #113 of 162
Quote:
Originally posted by BR
The Dow is not in the business of educating our children.

Neither is Coca Cola. That's the point. And it should be kept that way.
"Hearing a corrupt CEO like Cheney denigrate Edwards for being a trial lawyer is like hearing a child molester complain how Larry Flint is a pervert." -johnq
Reply
"Hearing a corrupt CEO like Cheney denigrate Edwards for being a trial lawyer is like hearing a child molester complain how Larry Flint is a pervert." -johnq
Reply
post #114 of 162
Quote:
Originally posted by BR
Retards should not be the priority. The return on investment simply is non-existant.

Nice. What do you propose we do with them?

Something like: "Here, play with this crayon for the next 60 years."?

Are they the priority now?
"Many people would sooner die than think; in fact, they do so." - Bertrand Russell
Reply
"Many people would sooner die than think; in fact, they do so." - Bertrand Russell
Reply
post #115 of 162
Quote:
Originally posted by bunge
Neither is Coca Cola. That's the point. And it should be kept that way.

I'm so glad you ignored the rest of my post.

 

“The nitrogen in our DNA, the calcium in our teeth, the iron in our blood, the carbon in our apple pies were made in the interiors of collapsing stars. We are made of starstuff.” 
-Sagan
Reply

 

“The nitrogen in our DNA, the calcium in our teeth, the iron in our blood, the carbon in our apple pies were made in the interiors of collapsing stars. We are made of starstuff.” 
-Sagan
Reply
post #116 of 162
Quote:
Originally posted by audiopollution
Nice. What do you propose we do with them?

Something like: "Here, play with this crayon for the next 60 years."?

Are they the priority now?

When you are dying of cancer or some other disease, be glad that you nurtured the retards and neglected our greatest commodity, smart kids. Yes, throwing money at retards where the return on investment will possibly be gaining another McDonalds worker is definitely a higher priority than nurturing the intellectual growth of the highly gifted where the return on investment would be scientific breakthroughs that save lives and push humanity forward.

 

“The nitrogen in our DNA, the calcium in our teeth, the iron in our blood, the carbon in our apple pies were made in the interiors of collapsing stars. We are made of starstuff.” 
-Sagan
Reply

 

“The nitrogen in our DNA, the calcium in our teeth, the iron in our blood, the carbon in our apple pies were made in the interiors of collapsing stars. We are made of starstuff.” 
-Sagan
Reply
post #117 of 162
Quote:
Originally posted by bunge
Neither is Coca Cola. That's the point. And it should be kept that way.

It should be left up to the individual school. The parents should get to decide in some sort of democratic process. You do like democracy, don't you? For someone who is allegedly liberal you sure love the father knows best nanny dictator state.

 

“The nitrogen in our DNA, the calcium in our teeth, the iron in our blood, the carbon in our apple pies were made in the interiors of collapsing stars. We are made of starstuff.” 
-Sagan
Reply

 

“The nitrogen in our DNA, the calcium in our teeth, the iron in our blood, the carbon in our apple pies were made in the interiors of collapsing stars. We are made of starstuff.” 
-Sagan
Reply
post #118 of 162
Quote:
Originally posted by BR
When you are dying of cancer or some other disease, be glad that you nurtured the retards and neglected our greatest commodity, smart kids. Yes, throwing money at retards where the return on investment will possibly be gaining another McDonalds worker is definitely a higher priority than nurturing the intellectual growth of the highly gifted where the return on investment would be scientific breakthroughs that save lives and push humanity forward.

Hopefully you're smart enough to realize that one day, should someone actually find you interesting/attractive/intelligent enough to marry, you may have kids.

I'll be happy to keep in mind that your child, if born mentally handicapped, should be relegated to the 'useless' pile. Make sure you tell us, if it happens, so we can ridicule your lack of ability to produce something as 'smart' as you.

I'll even give you the crayon, since you probably wouldn't even invest the 50 cents, considering.

By the way ... answer the question: Are they a priority now?
"Many people would sooner die than think; in fact, they do so." - Bertrand Russell
Reply
"Many people would sooner die than think; in fact, they do so." - Bertrand Russell
Reply
post #119 of 162
Quote:
Originally posted by BR
I'm so glad you ignored the rest of my post.

Simply because I think you didn't understand my point.

The influences of Dow and Coca Cola should be kept out of the schools. Neither has an interest in helping the students, they have ulterior motives that shouldn't be allowed in schools.
"Hearing a corrupt CEO like Cheney denigrate Edwards for being a trial lawyer is like hearing a child molester complain how Larry Flint is a pervert." -johnq
Reply
"Hearing a corrupt CEO like Cheney denigrate Edwards for being a trial lawyer is like hearing a child molester complain how Larry Flint is a pervert." -johnq
Reply
post #120 of 162
Quote:
Originally posted by BR
It should be left up to the individual school. The parents should get to decide in some sort of democratic process. You do like democracy, don't you? For someone who is allegedly liberal you sure love the father knows best nanny dictator state.

Yeah, I've heard it all before. Someone gets upset and starts to call me names. Ouch. You done with the attacks? Good.

OK, schools have a goal, to educate students. Anything that interferes with that is not helpful. A school and the school system is not a microcosm of our government. It's a school while the government is a government, and likewise, a business is a business. All three should be run and handled differently because each has completely separate motives and goals.

Besides, democracy doesn't even work the way you're suggesting. When a bill is in congress, do we all go to the polls to vote? No? Does that mean we don't like democracy? No. Representation.

School boards and administrators represent us in the school system. That's so (hypothetically) people more educated than we are in the specifics of running a school ultimately make the decisions. It also allows for accountability, so when a mistake is made, it can be permanently corrected.
"Hearing a corrupt CEO like Cheney denigrate Edwards for being a trial lawyer is like hearing a child molester complain how Larry Flint is a pervert." -johnq
Reply
"Hearing a corrupt CEO like Cheney denigrate Edwards for being a trial lawyer is like hearing a child molester complain how Larry Flint is a pervert." -johnq
Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: General Discussion
AppleInsider › Forums › General › General Discussion › California bans soft drink sales in school