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post #81 of 132
Thread Starter 
Try this damn matrix multiplication. It was made with Expressionist and I removed the commentaries :

$$\\mit \\eta \\Omega \
m =\\left({\\matrix{1&0&0&0\\cr
0&-1&0&0\\cr
0&0&-1&0\\cr
0&0&0&-1\\cr}}\
ight)\\left({\\matrix{0&-{g}_{x}&-{g}_{y}&-{g}_{z}\\cr
{g}_{x}&1&-{\\omega }_{z}&{\\omega }_{y}\\cr
{g}_{y}&{\\omega }_{z}&0&-{\\omega }_{x}\\cr
{g}_{z}&-{\\omega }_{y}&{\\omega }_{x}&0\\cr}}\
ight)=\\left({\\matrix{0&-{g}_{x}&-{g}_{y}&-{g}_{z}\\cr
-{g}_{x}&0&{\\omega }_{z}&-{\\omega }_{y}\\cr
-{g}_{y}&-{\\omega }_{z}&0&{\\omega }_{x}\\cr
-{g}_{z}&{\\omega }_{y}&-{\\omega }_{x}&0\\cr}}\
ight)$$

It is VERY quick with Expressionist. How much time it could take you in pure TeX editing ? Try to find and correct the mistake in this. :P

Expressionist is an old commercial product, working only in Classic. Its successor is MathEQ, for OS X (which I don't have)

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post #82 of 132
Commercial, and last updated a few years ago. It's basically abandonware at this point. (The only commercial web page I could find for it proudly announced it was System 7 compatible, if that gives you any idea...)
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post #83 of 132
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally posted by Kickaha
Commercial, and last updated a few years ago. It's basically abandonware at this point. (The only commercial web page I could find for it proudly announced it was System 7 compatible, if that gives you any idea...)

It's not abandonned at all. It was brough by another company which sells it as MathEQ. It's all OS X now.

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post #84 of 132
Thread Starter 
A last example. Select this, paste it into TeXShop and compile. It works.

%]|Expr|[#>`b___}),# b'4" *~: ;bP8&c55*I,]<2^1("2"!Symbol^:!k}}|
%|<c" #)!# b'4$^: g_(!:!mn}}& b!( b"0 b#8 b$@ b%H b&P!WW}^;bP7W|
%|_}<c!$1('$^;bP8G(!mn}^l: !$^:!G(!lk}^k: /0$^:!G(!mk}^l: !$^:!G|
%|(!nl}(": !:!k}}}<b R(": /0g}_}!$^d_^4x,K<2^1("2:!k}}<c"$#('$^|
%|: h_^:!m: !!<b R("/0g}_}!d$^:!s^m_}(": ;bP7.V:!W}_}}& b!( b"0 b#8 b$@ b%H b&P!WW}]|[
$$I={1 \\over 2\\kappa }\\int_{\\Omega }^{}{g}^{\\mu \
u }\\left({{\\Gamma }_{\\mu \
u }^{\\lambda }\\,{\\Gamma }_{\\lambda \\kappa }^{\\kappa }-{\\Gamma }_{\\mu \\kappa }^{\\lambda }\\,{\\Gamma }_{\
u \\lambda }^{\\,\\kappa }}\
ight)\\sqrt {-g}\\,{d}^{4}x+{1 \\over 2\\kappa }\\oint\\limits_{\\partial \\Omega }^{}{h}^{\\mu }\\,\\,\\sqrt {-g}\\,d{\\sigma }_{\\mu }$$

The commentaries aren't necessary for you, but it is important for Expressionist. It's a big integral with lots of tensors indices. Should be a pain to write in LaTeX and to edit. Fast with Expressionist (or MathEQ) because it's all WYSIWYG.

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post #85 of 132
Quote:
Originally posted by Kali
Should be a pain to write in LaTeX and to edit. Fast with Expressionist (or MathEQ) because it's all WYSIWYG.

Yes, if you are not familiar with LaTeX explicit coding. Formulas like this are from the very simple ones I have encountered or deal with. Imagine succesive equalities or equations taking up a page or two or more after compilation. Then we have something to talk about...
post #86 of 132
Thread Starter 
How do you set a bold, non-italic, greek symbol in TeXShop ?

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post #87 of 132
Quote:
Originally posted by Kali
How do you set a bold, non-italic, greek symbol in TeXShop ?

With \\usepackage{amsbsy} you can enable the command \\boldsymbol{argument}. The package \\usepackage{upgreek} gives you what it says, for example \\upgamma makes an upright gamma \\Upgamma makes an upright Gamma, etc. These fonts may be a little different from the normal ones. Combining the two you have what do you want. For example, $\\boldsymbol{\\Uptheta}$ will give an upright, bold Theta.
post #88 of 132
Thread Starter 
I need few other things :

1- How to set up margins
2- How to cross reference an equation
3- How to put a figure between two paragraphs.

About 2, there's some numeroted equation between two paragraphs. Far away in the text, I want to tell about that equation. How ?

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post #89 of 132
Quote:
Originally posted by Kali
I need few other things :
1- How to set up margins

With \\hsize and \\vsize you set up horizontal and vertical document size. With \\hoffset and \\voffset you set up horizontal and vertical offset. For example:

\\hsize 17truecm
\\vsize 25truecm
\\voffset 0.5truecm
\\hoffset 2.5truecm

Offset can be negative. You declare these before the \\begin{document}.

Quote:

2- How to cross reference an equation

You have first to markup the equation. For example,

\\begin{equation}\\label{eq:a_word_of_your_choice}
f(x)=\\exp(-ax)
\\end{equation}

Quote:

3- How to put a figure between two paragraphs.

If it is an EPS file, you can use the package graphicx,

\\usepackage[dvips]{graphicx}

Then you can say something like

\\begin{figure}
\\begin{center}
\\includegraphics[width=0.5\\textwidth]{test.eps}
\\caption{This is a graphic}
\\label{fig:my_graphic}
\\end{center}
\\end{figure}

Quote:

About 2, there's some numeroted equation between two paragraphs. Far away in the text, I want to tell about that equation. How ?

For the example above, if you say

\
ef{eq:a_word_of_your_choice}

in the place you want, you will obtain in the output the equation number automatically attributed by LaTeX to your equation. Taking correctly the numbers may require two or three successive compilations (with the first one normally you will see some warnings). You can do the same thing with the graphics labels (see above, my_graphic).
post #90 of 132
Thread Starter 
Thanks a LOT for your help. This is really appreciated.

It is likely (but the probability is still low) that I adopt LaTeX for my futur documents. I'll have to experiment again with various other things before it will be it. But like I said before, I find this system very archaic. There is too much things (codes, commands) to learn. It's not user-friendly at all and I don't feel any control on my documents.

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post #91 of 132
Quote:
Originally posted by Kickaha
Commercial, and last updated a few years ago. It's basically abandonware at this point. (The only commercial web page I could find for it proudly announced it was System 7 compatible, if that gives you any idea...)

Several years ago, Expressionist returned to Theorist Interactive, LLC, a company owned by the product's original developer. It has been renamed MathEQ. The product was introduced as a Mac-only application. Current versions run natively on MacOS 8/9, MacOS X 10.x, and Windows 95/98/Me/NT4/2000/XP. Linux and Solaris versions are in development. You may download the most recent version of MathEQ for your computer at this web page.
post #92 of 132
On the above mentioned examples, for the one with the matrices, you would want to enter it in a more readable fashion, say something like this:

$$ \\eta \\Omega = \\begin{pmatrix}
\t1 & 0 & 0 & 0 \\\\
\t0 & -1 & 0 & 0 \\\\
\t0 & 0 & -1 & 0 \\\\
\t0 & 0 & 0 & -1 \\end{pmatrix}
\t\\,
\t\\begin{pmatrix}
\t0 & -g_x & -g_y & -g_z \\\\
\tg_x & 1 & -\\omega_z & \\omega_y \\\\
\tg_y & \\omega_z & 0 & -\\omega_z \\\\
\tg_z & -\\omega_y & \\omega_x & 0 \\end{pmatrix}
\t=
\t\\begin{pmatrix}
\t0 & -g_x & -g_y & -g_z \\\\
\t-g_x & 0 & \\omega_z & -\\omega_y \\\\
\t-g_y & -\\omega_z & 0 & \\omega_x \\\\
\t-g_z & \\omega_y & -\\omega_x & 0 \\end{pmatrix} $$

Then it is not so hard to find mistakes. I'm not a very good typist. It took me 3 minutes and 5 seconds to enter this. On your final example, the integral with the tensors, I entered that in 1 minute 55 seconds. I'm not sure how this compares with your times. The point is that once you've done it a while, you can just look at an equation and the translation into TeX happens on an almost subconscious level, in much the same way that you can look at a word and type it without really thinking about where each individual letter key is.

I also tried the MathEQ trial version today for a little while. Unfortunately my efforts were thwarted by my inability to find most of the Greek letters, and the help system was not implemented. I must, however, admit that it is more flexible than I would have thought.
post #93 of 132
Quote:
Originally posted by Mr. Me
Several years ago, Expressionist returned to Theorist Interactive, LLC, a company owned by the product's original developer. It has been renamed MathEQ. The product was introduced as a Mac-only application. Current versions run natively on MacOS 8/9, MacOS X 10.x, and Windows 95/98/Me/NT4/2000/XP. Linux and Solaris versions are in development. You may download the most recent version of MathEQ for your computer at this web page.

Ah, this explains why I couldn't find a lick of information on Expressionist. Thanks for the clarification.
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post #94 of 132
Quote:
Originally posted by PB
With \\hsize and \\vsize you set up horizontal and vertical document size. With \\hoffset and \\voffset you set up horizontal and vertical offset. For example:

\\hsize 17truecm
\\vsize 25truecm
\\voffset 0.5truecm
\\hoffset 2.5truecm

Offset can be negative. You declare these before the \\begin{document}.

Alternate method:

\\textwidth = 6.5 in
\\textheight = 9 in
\\oddsidemargin = 0.0 in
\\evensidemargin = 0.0 in
\\topmargin = 0.0 in
\\headheight = 0.0 in
\\headsep = 0.0 in
\\parskip = 0.2in
\\parindent = 0.0in


Quote:
If it is an EPS file, you can use the package graphicx,

\\usepackage[dvips]{graphicx}

Then you can say something like

\\begin{figure}
\\begin{center}
\\includegraphics[width=0.5\\textwidth]{test.eps}
\\caption{This is a graphic}
\\label{fig:my_graphic}
\\end{center}
\\end{figure}

A better approach in my experience, due to PDF being so ubiquitous on MacOS X, is to use the follow snippet prior to /begin {document}:

\
ewif\\ifpdf
\\ifx\\pdfoutput\\undefined
\\pdffalse % we are not running PDFLaTeX
\\else
\\pdfoutput=1 % we are running PDFLaTeX
\\pdftrue
\\fi

\\ifpdf
\\usepackage[pdftex]{graphicx}
\\else
\\usepackage{graphicx}
\\fi

This sends the pdftex option to graphicx iff you are running pdflatex, and it lets you read in PDF files. Note that with this you do not need to give the .pdf file extension, and your code is portable to using files with .eps as well:


\\begin{figure}
\\centerline {
\\includegraphics[width=2.75in]{SPQRFlow}
}
\\caption{SPQR Tool Chain} \\label{spqrflow}
\\end{figure}

With pdflatex, it'll grab SPQRFlow.pdf, but on systems not as PDF aware, it'll grab SPQRFlow.eps with no change to the document. Very handy, since pdf -> eps tools are easy to come by now.
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post #95 of 132
Thread Starter 
Guys, how do you make a box around an equation in TeXShop ?
I want some space around the equation inside the box, so it can "breath" a little. I mean, the edges of the box shouldn't be too close to the equation. The box purpose is to highlight the equation as an important one.

Also, how do you control the space between two paragraphs ? In what I've done, sometimes LaTeX is puting an empty line between two paragraphs, and sometimes it doesn't. There's nothing special in my code. When there's an equation between two paragraphs, sometimes LaTeX put too much space around the equ, and sometimes the equ is too close from the paragraphs.

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post #96 of 132
Thread Starter 
I have another question.

In LaTeX, how do you place two (or more) equations on the same line ? I want one equation in the middle left, and a second one in the middle right. How do you do that ?

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post #97 of 132
Quote:
Originally posted by Kali
Guys, how do you make a box around an equation in TeXShop ?
I want some space around the equation inside the box, so it can "breath" a little. I mean, the edges of the box shouldn't be too close to the equation. The box purpose is to highlight the equation as an important one.

Documentation on boxes.

You can try something like

{\\setlength{\\fboxsep}{1cm}\\makebox[\\textwidth]{\\framebox{$your equation$}}}

\\fboxsep is the space \\framebox will leave around the equation. In the example, 1cm may be a little too much. You can have variable values of \\fboxsep accross equations.

Quote:

Also, how do you control the space between two paragraphs ? In what I've done, sometimes LaTeX is puting an empty line between two paragraphs, and sometimes it doesn't.

The first empty line you leave will tell LaTeX to create a paragraph space. After that, extra empty lines are simply ignored in LaTeX. You have to put something like

\\vspace{1cm}

or

\\vskip1cm

(with the amount of spacing you want--negative spaces allowed), if you want for some reason more space.

LaTeX specifies spacing between paragraphs and equations according to the needs of the page layout and the amount of equations in the page. When many equations are there, you may need to intervene manually by rearranging things or the equations, so they better fit in a narrow layout.
post #98 of 132
Quote:
Originally posted by Kali
In LaTeX, how do you place two (or more) equations on the same line ? I want one equation in the middle left, and a second one in the middle right. How do you do that ?

You can try this:

$$
a = b \\quad\\quad\\quad\\quad d = c
$$

This leaves 4 \\quad spaces. For more space use more \\quads, for less space use less of them. There is also a stronger version, \\qquad, with more space. Is that what you want to do? To fine tune your spacing, you can instead of \\quads use \\hspace{the amount of space in cm} (you can also define the space in inches (in) or points (pt)). For example,

$$
a = b \\hspace{5.32cm} d = c
$$
post #99 of 132
Quote:
Originally posted by Kali


My problems are these : there is no links between separate documents. I have this long Contents file and all the separate chapters and sections. I can't just click on a content and automatically go to the selected section. Also, there are many related sections between the files, but as soon as I change one, the other is broken and needs to be updated. This is a real pain in the a** to update. That's why I need to change my writing tools.


Kali,

Glad to see you're making headway with Texshop. For what it's worth, though, Framemaker handles the problems you've described very easily. Separate files can be bundled together into a book, with xrefs, pagination and so on automatically updating across files.

I used to use Nisus myself, but I never really liked it. To my mind, Framemaker is vastly better than Nisus in every important respect. Download a demo and check it out!
post #100 of 132
At $800, it *better* be better than Nisus...

Framemaker is the shibnitz. It's also pricey. If money is no object, then heck yeah, it's a stellar way to go.

Being a grad student, I'll stick with TeXShop.
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post #101 of 132
Quote:
Originally posted by PB
Documentation on boxes.

You can try something like

{\\setlength{\\fboxsep}{1cm}\\makebox[\\textwidth]{\\framebox{$your equation$}}}

\\fboxsep is the space \\framebox will leave around the equation. In the example, 1cm may be a little too much. You can have variable values of \\fboxsep accross equations.

You can also use the fancybox package, which defines the Beqnarray and Beqnarray* environments. eg:

\\fbox{
\\begin{Beqnarray}
a &=& x^3
\\end{beqnarray}
}

That creates a box just big enough to hold the equations.
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post #102 of 132
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally posted by PB
Documentation on boxes.

You can try something like

{\\setlength{\\fboxsep}{1cm}\\makebox[\\textwidth]{\\framebox{$your equation$}}}

\\fboxsep is the space \\framebox will leave around the equation. In the example, 1cm may be a little too much. You can have variable values of \\fboxsep accross equations.


It didn't worked well. I also tried the other suggestion but it gives an ugly thing. Is there something to declare in the header ?

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post #103 of 132
Thread Starter 
Another thing :

When I make several equations, one on top of the other and all linked by an equality, I want them to align to the equality (to the left). By default, LaTeX center all the equation, like this (the stars are necessary here, other wise the equs will be aligned to the equality !!!) :

**************a = b + c - d

**********= gamma * sigma - bc

****************= d + g

I want this :

a = b + c - d

* = gamma * sigma - bc

* = d + g

How can I do that ?

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post #104 of 132
eqnarray

\\begin{eqnarray}
a & = & c\\\\
& = & d + 4\\\\
x & < & 13 \\cos(y)
\\end{eqnarray}

This uses the array coding style to align everything based on the second column. Note the lack of anything in the first column in the second row. That's legal.
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post #105 of 132
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally posted by Kickaha
eqnarray

\\begin{eqnarray}
a & = & c\\\\
& = & d + 4\\\\
x & < & 13 \\cos(y)
\\end{eqnarray}

This uses the array coding style to align everything based on the second column. Note the lack of anything in the first column in the second row. That's legal.

I just tried it. It works, but the spacing is too wide, and there is an equ. number for each line, which is too much and useless.

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post #106 of 132
Anytime you see an environment, like eqnarray, that adds equation/section/figure numbers, tack a * on the end, and you get the non-numbered form.

And you can adjust the spacing as we already pointed out.

\\begin{eqnarray*}
a & = & c\\\\
& = & d + 4\\\\
x & < & 13 \\cos(y)
\\end{eqnarray*}


So which books do you have on order to learn LaTeX?
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post #107 of 132
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally posted by Kickaha
Anytime you see an environment, like eqnarray, that adds equation/section/figure numbers, tack a * on the end, and you get the non-numbered form.

And you can adjust the spacing as we already pointed out.

\\begin{eqnarray*}
a & = & c\\\\
& = & d + 4\\\\
x & < & 13 \\cos(y)
\\end{eqnarray*}


So which books do you have on order to learn LaTeX?

This is better, but I don't like the spacing on each side of the =.

Which books ? I dunno yet. In the past 10 years, I made three large books on theoretical physics. One about Classical Mechanics, one about Quantum Mechanics, and a bigger one on Relativity Theory (Special Relativity, Classical Field Theory, Gauge Theory and General Relativity). The first one is about 200 pages. The second one is about 500 pages, and the bigger one is about 1000 pages. They were never published (not yet). They all were made in Nisus with Expressionist. Last year, I moved to OS X and it became necessary to update my writing tools (and all my documents !). I want to publish the bigger book, or a part of it.

Since the last days, I'm experiencing LaTeX for the first time. To make the exercice more interesting, I'm updating the first book (the smaller one, on Classical Mechanics). I do lots of copy/paste from Nisus to TeXShop. I already made a document of about 30 pages, full of equations and figures. It's nice, but I don't like much the spacings. I still have to tweak the code. Maybe someone here could be interested in seeing the source code (it's all in French, sorry) ?

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post #108 of 132
Thread Starter 
What is the default font used in LaTeX, for the main text and what is the font used for the greek in the mathematical expressions ? I like these.

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post #109 of 132
Quote:
Originally posted by Kali
What is the default font used in LaTeX, for the main text and what is the font used for the greek in the mathematical expressions ? I like these.

The main document uses the cmr family, Computer Modern Roman; the greek in the equations are from cmmi, Computer Modern Math Italics.
post #110 of 132
Quote:
Originally posted by Kali
It didn't worked well.

Could you be please a little more explicit? I don't see where is the problem.
post #111 of 132
Quote:
Originally posted by Kali
I just tried it. It works, but the spacing is too wide, and there is an equ. number for each line, which is too much and useless.

You can tell which equations take a number and which not. For example,

\\begin{eqnarray}
a & = & c \
onumber \\\\
& = & d + 4 \
onumber \\\\
x & < & 13 \\cos(y)
\\end{eqnarray}

will eliminate numbering from the first and the second ones, while the third one will normally take its number.

As for spacing: when you have many aligned equations, you have to leave more space, just to make the content more readable and show more clearly the alignment. That's how displayed equations should be shown, and LaTeX takes automatically care of that. Now if you want, for some reason, reduce the spacing, you can declare something like:

\\begin{eqnarray}
a\\kern-5pt & = &\\kern-5pt c \
onumber \\\\
\\kern-5pt & = &\\kern-5pt d + 4 \
onumber \\\\
x\\kern-5pt & < &\\kern-5pt 13 \\cos(y)
\\end{eqnarray}

This will reduce spacing in both sides by 5 points. Obviously each equation can have its own spacing, if needed, and you can have asymetric spacing (left with respect to right) too.
post #112 of 132
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally posted by PB
Could you be please a little more explicit? I don't see where is the problem.


Sorry, I made several typos error in my code. Now it works but :

I typed this :

{\\setlength{\\fboxsep}{1cm}\\makebox[\\textwidth]{\\framebox{$your equation$}}}

It works, but I need to adjust visually spacing. 1 cm is much too wide. But if I type this :

\\begin{equation}
{\\setlength{\\fboxsep}{0.25cm}\\makebox[\\textwidth]{\\framebox{a=b}}}
\\end{equation}

then the equation number is misplaced. Too low. Not centered.

When I used the other suggestion for a box, it gave me a box with a misplaced equation number (inside the box !?? YUK!) and the equation appeared all squeezed. Ugly as a butt.

Expressionist suggested me this code, which works (but...) :

\\begin{equation}
\\vbox{\\hrule\\hbox{\\vrule$\\ \\matrix{\\ \\cr
\\mit U(r)=-{GMm \\over r}\\cr
\
m \\ \\cr}\\ $\\vrule}\\hrule}
\\end{equation}

I understand nothing of this code, except that in Expressionist I made a small matrix with a single column with three rows (for spacing), placed and empty space on each row and the equation in the middle. That way, spacing is looking nice (don't forget Expressionist and MathEQ are WYSIWYG math editor).

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post #113 of 132
Quote:
Originally posted by Kali
I typed this :

{\\setlength{\\fboxsep}{1cm}\\makebox[\\textwidth]{\\framebox{$your equation$}}}

It works, but I need to adjust visually spacing. 1 cm is much too wide. But if I type this :

\\begin{equation}
{\\setlength{\\fboxsep}{0.25cm}\\makebox[\\textwidth]{\\framebox{a=b}}}
\\end{equation}

then the equation number is misplaced. Too low. Not centered.


My bad. Just remove completely the \\textwidth. Your code should be

\\begin{equation}
{\\setlength{\\fboxsep}{0.25cm}\\makebox{\\framebo x{a=b}}}
\\end{equation}
post #114 of 132
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally posted by PB
My bad. Just remove completely the \\textwidth. Your code should be

\\begin{equation}
{\\setlength{\\fboxsep}{0.25cm}\\makebox{\\framebo x{a=b}}}
\\end{equation}

Sorry. I made a mistake again. It works perfectly now. Thanks.

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post #115 of 132
Thread Starter 
But why do I have to interfere constantly to adjust spacing everywhere ? LaTeX isn't supposed to free our thinking from layout and presentation ? I find myself constantly adding \\vspace{0.25 in} between some paragraphs to adjust manually spacing, after compilation, just because compilation is giving me bad placements. Very often, text is too close from equations. I want a constant spacing between equations and text. Is there a command for that too ? Even with a book, I can't memorize all those commands, and I can't predict the results. This is frustrating.

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post #116 of 132
You're over thinking it, most likely.

All those spacings have names, and you can set each one of them individually to address the whole document at one shot.

Or, it could be that you simply don't care for the default spacings in LaTeX. Personally, I think it's the best thing out there, and I rarely, if ever, adjust spacings. But then, I'm used to the form in my journals and such. It looks 'right' to me.


Seriously, get a basic book like those listed in here, and you'll be much happier. Those various adjustments are some of the first things you learn.
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post #117 of 132
Thread Starter 
I have (again) other requirements on my text :

1-I want constant spacing between paragraphs.
2-I want constant spacing between text and equations.
3-How can I type a small sentence (text) and a centered equation on the same line ? Example :

And here we have************a = b - c.

Not this :

And here we have
******************************a = b - c.

4-How can I place a figure anywhere on a page ? I don't want it to appears on top of the page only. What should I add to this code :

****text of paragraph #1 *********

\\begin{figure}
\\centerline {
\\includegraphics[width=2.75in]{Fig1}
}
\\caption{L'espace-temps newtonien.} \\label{espace-temps}
\\end{figure}
\\vspace{0.25 in}

****text of paragraph #2 *********

so the figure appears BETWEEN paragraphs #1 and #2 ? Not on top of the page.

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post #118 of 132
Quote:
Originally posted by Kali
I have (again) other requirements on my text :

1-I want constant spacing between paragraphs.
2-I want constant spacing between text and equations.
3-How can I type a small sentence (text) and a centered equation on the same line ? Example :

And here we have************a = b - c.

Not this :

And here we have
******************************a = b - c.

$eq here$ is short hand for 'in-place' math. Try:

And here we have \\hfill $a = b - c$.

Quote:
4-How can I place a figure anywhere on a page ? I don't want it to appears on top of the page only. What should I add to this code :

\\begin{figure}[h]
\\centerline {
\\includegraphics[width=2.75in]{Fig1}
}
\\caption{L'espace-temps newtonien.} \\label{espace-temps}
\\end{figure}
\\vspace{0.25 in}

The [h] means here. You can give several options in a row, and it will attempt to comply in that order. So [htb] would mean 'try here first, then the top of a page, then the bottom'.
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post #119 of 132
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally posted by Kickaha
\\begin{figure}[h]
\\centerline {
\\includegraphics[width=2.75in]{Fig1}
}
\\caption{L'espace-temps newtonien.} \\label{espace-temps}
\\end{figure}
\\vspace{0.25 in}

The [h] means here. You can give several options in a row, and it will attempt to comply in that order. So [htb] would mean 'try here first, then the top of a page, then the bottom'.

This is very hard to control and predict. I've tried it and, very often, the figure appears randomly elswhere. I've found myself to tweak the text and the paragraphs spacement so the figure appears exactly where I want. Actually, I found myself "fighting" the system (LaTeX) too much. This isn't normal. I guess I'm trying to work the old way, the wrong way with LaTeX. But then, what is the book template I should use ? I'm really confused here.

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post #120 of 132
The figure actually follows a well-defined deterministic placement algorithm, not random. It's explained quite well in several texts on LaTeX.

First off, don't do *ANY* tweaking until you have *ALL* your text and figures and equations in there in their *FINAL* form. Remember, content, not format. I've literally had a change from a three-letter to a four-letter word bump a document from 10pgs to 10.5. Get that *content* right, and then, and *ONLY* then start thinking about flow and format. Often times you'll find yourself fighting LaTeX because you keep thinking "Dammit, I *just* put that where I wanted it, and now it moved it!" Resist that. Resist it hard. This is not a word processor or manual layout system, this is an automatic typographical 'compiler'.

Yeah, it's quite different, and a lot of people get up in arms over it because it isn't Word- or Pagemaker-esque. It's better.

For one thing, if you see systematic changes you'd like to make (such as paragraph spacing), do *NOT* make adjustments per paragraph... you'll go insane. Find the setting for *that particular* spacing, and adjust it there. Clean, simple, fast.

LaTeX isn't something that you can learn in a night or two by asking questions on a forum. Buy a recommended text. Really. That's the best advice any of us can give you. You'll find that it has more than you expected, and that it's easier than you might think.
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