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Video Card Acceleration :::

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 
Was wondering, on the PC, DirectX is used primarily in games for video......

what does the mac use?

Is directX going to be implemented on the mac? or has it already?

what type of video drivers are used/included with the GeForce3 and GF4 Ti on the mac?
post #2 of 14
No its not part of the Mac and it will never be; of course never say never

DirectX is a Microsoft developed (and owned) API. DirectX encompases a set of functions that allow programmers to have access to hardware in an abstract/generic way. On the Mac (OS X) there is OpenGL (primarily for 3D, but it can also be used for 2D), and then for other issues such as sound, input/joysticks/gamepads, and network-related-stuff there are other APIs. In OS 9 there were the Sprockets (sp?) APIs for utilizing all that stuff.

Drivers for video cards are not related to an API such as DirectX. DirectX, OpenGL, Sprockets merely provide an abstract way to access the features of video cards without having to know what "specific" video card is installed (well this is mostly true, I believe that there are some cases where knowing "what" specific hardware is in a system can be helpful).

So don't confuse the API with the driver. A driver is written to adhere to the specification of an operating system. So the Geforce3 driver for Windows, Linux, and Mac will all be implemented differently, in order to conform to the interface that the operating system supports. Of course, ideally all the features for the Geforce3 will be implemented for all operating systems. The API (DirectX/OpenGL) just allows you to access the features that are supported by the driver.

Okay, I'm repeating myself and its late. Goodnight.

[ 05-31-2002: Message edited by: fuzz_ball ]</p>
post #3 of 14
Thread Starter 
does mac os9 and mac os x both use openGL?
post #4 of 14
post #5 of 14
[quote]Originally posted by AirSluf:
<strong>Yes, for 3D applications.</strong><hr></blockquote>Plus, Mac OS X will soon (10.2, Jaguar) use OpenGL to accelerate the Quartz compositor, speeding up the whole 2.5D interface overall. You'll need a current video card to do it, though. PCI cards and older AGP cards with prior to the Radeon or GeForce2MX are technologically inferior to today's offerings and will not support "Quartz Extreme" (though they will run 10.2 just fine without it).
post #6 of 14
[quote]Originally posted by starfleetX:
<strong>. PCI cards and older AGP cards with prior to the Radeon or GeForce2MX are technologically inferior to today's offerings and will not support "Quartz Extreme" (though they will run 10.2 just fine without it).</strong><hr></blockquote>

That's not Apple say on his own site after WWDC. Quartz extreme will be supported by geforce 2 mx and radeon AGP card.

From the french site : *Â*NVIDIA : GeForce2MX, GeForce3, GeForce4 Ti, GeForce4 ou GeForce4MX. ATI : toute carte AGP Radeon. 32 Mo de VRAM recommandés pour une performance optimale.

[ 05-31-2002: Message edited by: powerdoc ]</p>
post #7 of 14
I do not have the link anymore, but about a month ago it was announced a company made something to the effect of direct x for the mac, and it can be used to port over programs and games very easily to the Mac...
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post #8 of 14
Thread Starter 
how did os 9 handle 2D info?
post #9 of 14
[quote]Originally posted by powerdoc:
<strong>That's not Apple say on his own site after WWDC. Quartz extreme will be supported by geforce 2 mx and radeon AGP card.</strong><hr></blockquote>The key words of my post were prior to, meaning cards that were released before the Radeon and GeForce2MX.
post #10 of 14
[quote]Originally posted by Badtz:
<strong>how did os 9 handle 2D info?</strong><hr></blockquote>
OS9's 2D was done through the venerable QuickDraw. OSX uses the Quartz PDF based engine. I believe Quickdraw is still used in some Carbon apps. I may be wrong on that.
post #11 of 14
[quote]Originally posted by Jeremiah Rich:
<strong>I do not have the link anymore, but about a month ago it was announced a company made something to the effect of direct x for the mac, and it can be used to port over programs and games very easily to the Mac...</strong><hr></blockquote>

...i remember hearing this...
post #12 of 14
So do I. Does anyone have a link, or are we just getting dimensia?
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post #13 of 14
[quote]Originally posted by Aquatik:
<strong>So do I. Does anyone have a link, or are we just getting dimensia?</strong><hr></blockquote>

You guys (I mean that in a gender-neutral way) are thinking of one of two things:

1) MacDX, which you can read about <a href="http://www.insidemacgames.com/news/story.php?ArticleID=5250" target="_blank">here</a>

or

2) Dynamite, which you can read about <a href="http://www.insidemacgames.com/news/story.php?ArticleID=5461" target="_blank">here</a>


Neither is about "porting DirectX" to the Mac. The first, MacDX, is simply a "wrapper" around the DirectX calls that allow programmers to more easily port games from Windows to Mac. However, this is likely to only be beneficial to PC shops looking to expand, or brand new Mac porting shops, as the existing Mac porting shops are sure to have their own wrapper classes that they use when porting DirectX code.

Dynamite is a little different, and admittedly I've read very little of it, but it takes the concept that has been applied to the Transmeta chips (you remember them don't you?) and twists it into a form that will potentially allow cross-platform-deployement (we've heard this before, say it all together "Java"). Whether or not Dynamite lives up to it's promise remains to be seen. I'm not trying to imply that it can't, just that I'm skeptical at this point <img src="graemlins/bugeye.gif" border="0" alt="[Skeptical]" />

[ 05-31-2002: Message edited by: fuzz_ball ]</p>
post #14 of 14
[quote]Originally posted by starfleetX:
<strong>The key words of my post were prior to, meaning cards that were released before the Radeon and GeForce2MX.</strong><hr></blockquote>

Opps sorry .
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