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Who is Apple's target market?

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 
At first glance, on the desktop side, one would think they are only targeting those who are willing to pay $2 to $3k, or those who only want minimal spec AIOs. Neither of these are very large markets. Some people get upset when people say Apple is only targeting the rich or the content creation pro. But they really don't seem to be going after the masses. The Power line is for the pros. The rest of for the pros' wives and children, or so it seems.

Thoughts?
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post #2 of 13
Quote:
Originally posted by Mac Voyer
At first glance, on the desktop side, one would think they are only targeting those who are willing to pay $2 to $3k, or those who only want minimal spec AIOs. Neither of these are very large markets. Some people get upset when people say Apple is only targeting the rich or the content creation pro. But they really don't seem to be going after the masses. The Power line is for the pros. The rest of for the pros' wives and children, or so it seems.

Thoughts?

i would basically agree. the mac is almost exclusively for creative professionals: artists, editors, writers, photographers, musicians and the like. i know a lot of people who do not fall into these catagories that have a mac, but 100% of the time they bought a mac because of the way they saw me use mine, or how simple things were when they saw me use it, etc. I may be wrong, but i have yet to know a non-creative to buy one just because -- without any influence by someone they knew who was a creative.
post #3 of 13
as of right now, the mac market is well the mac market, that is to say upgrades to the existing installed user base. and the unix community and teens and 20-somethings who are pissed at the 200mb of security patches requiered to bring a fresh install of xp up to snuff - and that doesnt include updates for apps like directx, mediaplayer and movie maker - the reason i say teens and 20somethings is that by the age of 30, it is unlikely that your mind wil be changed on preferances - weather you drink coke or pepsi, prefere FORD or CHEVY and so on.
just my $0.02
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post #4 of 13
I'll reserve the bulk of my comments until I see the next iMac. The Powermacs aren't Apples problem area. It is the all-important $1000-1500 area that is extremely weak right now. Shore that up and AAPL is looking great.

Apple's target market has always been the consumer and creative types.
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post #5 of 13
Quote:
Originally posted by hmurchison
I'll reserve the bulk of my comments until I see the next iMac. The Powermacs aren't Apples problem area. It is the all-important $1000-1500 area that is extremely weak right now. Shore that up and AAPL is looking great.

Apple's target market has always been the consumer and creative types.

Bingo.
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post #6 of 13
I think that Apple's strategy (or rather, 'A good strategy for Apple would be...') is to make the iPod extremely popular, have iPod=cool, and then come out with an ad campaign that basically says 'We make computers, too".
post #7 of 13
Weird fact: an iMac G5 with a 17" display (when it debuts) is more than good enough to do professional 3D work on. Incidentally, it's also good enough to do slick video editing on, and iMovie and FCPE are there (now also Motion). I think Apple is marketing to people who have a few characteristics.

1) Middle/Upper income folks who are willing to pay a bit more for a better user experience. paying 500 more for a computer is not a huge deal if you have a decent income.

2) People who like to have fun with technology. No other platform offers as many entry level tools (the whole iLife bunch and more). This includes people who like to shoot a lot of digital photos or video. It's the whole digital hub concept. People are starting to buy into it.

3) Professionals in media and design.

The first two groups do overlap, but it's a huge market. Way bigger than 5% or whatever. Apple's problem is not really pricing. These are the same people who buy the 500 dollar option to get seats that warm up your ass. Apple's problem is the status quo. People who should consider macs don't, because of a stigma of uncompatibility that developed in the 90's.

But don't worry. Apple's market share and success will grow in the next ten years for the simple reason that us kids who have been exposed heavily to the internet weren't using computers much during the compatibility days (at least I wasn't. . . my dad had a tandy for a while. I wrote papers by hand when that was not the cool thing to do ) But anyway, the compatibility problem dies when the people who believe in it aren't young anymore.

So buy stock in Apple.
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post #8 of 13
Quote:
Originally posted by Placebo
I think that Apple's strategy (or rather, 'A good strategy for Apple would be...') is to make the iPod extremely popular, have iPod=cool, and then come out with an ad campaign that basically says 'We make computers, too".

Well step one is down, so when do the "computers too" ads come?
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post #9 of 13
Quote:
Originally posted by Splinemodel
Weird fact: an iMac G5 with a 17" display (when it debuts) is more than good enough to do professional 3D work on. Incidentally, it's also good enough to do slick video editing on, and iMovie and FCPE are there (now also Motion). I think Apple is marketing to people who have a few characteristics.

1) Middle/Upper income folks who are willing to pay a bit more for a better user experience. paying 500 more for a computer is not a huge deal if you have a decent income.

2) People who like to have fun with technology. No other platform offers as many entry level tools (the whole iLife bunch and more). This includes people who like to shoot a lot of digital photos or video. It's the whole digital hub concept. People are starting to buy into it.

3) Professionals in media and design.

The first two groups do overlap, but it's a huge market. Way bigger than 5% or whatever. Apple's problem is not really pricing. These are the same people who buy the 500 dollar option to get seats that warm up your ass. Apple's problem is the status quo. People who should consider macs don't, because of a stigma of uncompatibility that developed in the 90's.

But don't worry. Apple's market share and success will grow in the next ten years for the simple reason that us kids who have been exposed heavily to the internet weren't using computers much during the compatibility days (at least I wasn't. . . my dad had a tandy for a while. I wrote papers by hand when that was not the cool thing to do ) But anyway, the compatibility problem dies when the people who believe in it aren't young anymore.

So buy stock in Apple.

and for us not-so-richy-rich types (who would like to be some day) the product lifespan is longer, the newest windows apps choak on a 6 month old unit, whereas ilife 2k4 purrs on a 4 year old g3 tower thus we have more time between upgrades to stash $$ away
You can't quantify how much I don't care -- Bob Kevoian of the Bob and Tom Show.
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You can't quantify how much I don't care -- Bob Kevoian of the Bob and Tom Show.
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post #10 of 13
With Apple's server products and talk of enterprise, it would make sense for Apple to have a good office model Mac. The eMac might be okay in many cases, but Apple needs a low end model that is not an AIO.

I agree that if Apple does well on the next iMac, the consumer market is in pretty good shape, though it could use the same model as the enterprise market too.
post #11 of 13
Quote:
Originally posted by a_greer
as of right now, the mac market is well the mac market, that is to say upgrades to the existing installed user base. and the unix community and teens and 20-somethings who are pissed at the 200mb of security patches requiered to bring a fresh install of xp up to snuff - and that doesnt include updates for apps like directx, mediaplayer and movie maker - the reason i say teens and 20somethings is that by the age of 30, it is unlikely that your mind wil be changed on preferances - weather you drink coke or pepsi, prefere FORD or CHEVY and so on.
just my $0.02

Well i'm 30, and i'm always looking for things to be done easier, and if i see something that will make my life easier that the current situation then i'll adopt it.

the same can be said for my dad. He's 65 now and has used mac's ever since they introduced them in publishing. About 5 years ago he went freelance and had to use windows for editing, lack of cash, and he was quite happy to use it with my guidance. Then i switched him back about a year ago.

I think your argument about reaching a certain age and being stubborn, is for people that just can't admit being wrong, Like Most IT professionals.
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post #12 of 13
36 here and just got my first Mac a few months ago... an iBook. I've been a PC person (and still primarily am) for 20 years. The iBook was the right form factor and the right price to make it worth while to "experiment" with. I've been very happy so far and will probably look into a PowerBook in a year or so when there is a major update.
post #13 of 13
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally posted by a_greer
and for us not-so-richy-rich types (who would like to be some day) the product lifespan is longer, the newest windows apps choak on a 6 month old unit, whereas ilife 2k4 purrs on a 4 year old g3 tower thus we have more time between upgrades to stash $$ away

You must not be talking about GB and iDVD which is 2/5 of iLife.
Apple has no competition. Every commercial product which competes directly with an Apple product gives the distinct impression that, Where it is original, it is not good, and where it is good, it...
Reply
Apple has no competition. Every commercial product which competes directly with an Apple product gives the distinct impression that, Where it is original, it is not good, and where it is good, it...
Reply
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