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Which software do you use to create websites?

post #1 of 33
Thread Starter 
I'm about to switch from the PC world back to the Mac world, after an absence of about 6 years. I currently use Fusion (PC) for website work. I'm told I can continue to use it with Virtual PC, but was wondering what program most Mac users were using? I'm not into html coding and am most interested in a WYSIWYG approach.

Thanks for your feedback.
post #2 of 33
Adobe Golive is an option, I prefer it to Macromedia Dreamweaver for some reason, but I don't do any heavy web development stuff. Actually I tend to use the text editing more than wyswyg, though for tables, wyswyg is a lot nicer.
post #3 of 33
BBEdit

You can't beat code coded by hand. You'll also feel unknown pride when you are done, not because you did something great, but because you learned something.
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post #4 of 33
I use Adobe Golive.
post #5 of 33
I use both Dreamweaver and GoLive. GoLive appeals more the designer side of me but I like the way Dreamweaver does somethings so I use them both.

I have heard really good things about Freeway but I have never used it.
post #6 of 33
I have Dreamweaver and GoLive, but prefer the latter when a GUI is more productive. But most the time BBEdit is my tool of choice. Used Freeway for 30 minutes, and that was enough. Didn't find any redeeming value it in.
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post #7 of 33
Thread Starter 
Are you guys using Dreamweaver and GoLive TOGETHER? If so, just curious about interfacing the two?
post #8 of 33
Quote:
Originally posted by Belvadere
Are you guys using Dreamweaver and GoLive TOGETHER? If so, just curious about interfacing the two?

Personally I have GoLive installed, and only use it to create tables and forms (I'm to lazy to type in this informaton myself). But other than that I use BBEdit to create all my code. I usually program websites wiht JSP (preffered) or PHP.

When creating dynamic content, I find that its better to write the code yourself, rather than rely on some application to create it for you (more controll). Also, I find that WYSIWYG apps dont create code that validate against the W3c standard...

.:BoeManE:.
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post #9 of 33
Webobjects builder! HTML 3.2 all the way baby

post #10 of 33
BBEdit.

It's the only option.
post #11 of 33
SimpleText!!!!!!!!!


wait....that's a bit old
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post #12 of 33
SubEthaEdit

Live updating of your webpage as you create it. Mmm!
post #13 of 33
Emacs--not a pretty drag and drop interface but it does offer code highlighing and some other nice features for those of us raised on Unix.
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post #14 of 33
BBEdit for small projects.
Adobe Golive and BBEdit when the result needs to look sexy.
xemacs at school...

BBEdit is particularly nice when you have to write PHP pages, while xemacs often has a hard time with them.
With Golive, it's very easy to create nice-looking pages, but the output code often looks weird (sometimes totally ugly!), so you'd better edit the pages output by Golive...
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post #15 of 33
I used to work in Netobjects Fusion, but it was discontinued years ago on the mac. The alternative closest to Fusion that offers transparent nonhtml coding must be Freeway.

If you were to take the step and learn some decent html, I would recommend Tumult Hyperedit that offers live previewing of code in a very elegant way, and that for a fraction of the price of Dreamweaver. (a bit comparable to Homesite, that used to be bundled with Fusion).
post #16 of 33
BBEdit for the code.

Golive for looks and easy editing.

Flash for the fancy stuff.

Photoshop for graphics ofcourse.

Illustrator for advanced graphics and consept sketches,

Omnigraffle for hierarchic structure.

all browsers...

VPC, for testing on even more browsers...

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post #17 of 33
Belvadere

If you are coming from the PC side you should try Dreamweaver. Dreamweaver feels more like a PC application to me than GoLive does but then again all of Micromedia's applications seem to have a PC interface.

VanNostran
post #18 of 33
I am surprised that no-one has mentioned Nvu the Mozilla-based html editor. It is very beta on MacOS X, but does run natively.

It is not as good as the big boys, but it is free.
post #19 of 33
Mozilla! It's really easy! Hats off to 'em. Apple should add something like that in to Safari.
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post #20 of 33
Not that I'm any great shakes as a web developer, but I use a combination of BBEdit and Canvas.

OmniWeb also comes with a nice little editor with WebDAV support built in. I don't use it currently because I'm still dependent on FTP, and BBEdit has that built in.

BBEdit's template, #include and automation capabilities are incredibly powerful. They take time to learn, and time to set up, but once you've got them going site maintenance is almost pleasant.
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post #21 of 33
oh, forgot Transmit... my FTP weapon of choice...
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post #22 of 33
If we are talking about Transmit, then Fugu has to be mentioned. It can't do plain ftp, but it is miraculous on all of the secure file transfer methods.

And if you can't be secure *shudder*, then RBrowser should also be considered. Not my favorite interface, but nice functionality.
post #23 of 33
Quote:
Originally posted by New
oh, forgot Transmit... my FTP weapon of choice...


great tool. i love the edit feature. use it to do most of the editing on many of my existing sites. i also use both golive, and dreamweaver, plus, whatever text editor is handy and cssedit.
post #24 of 33
I use magic to make websites. And I don't mean a program, I mean like David Blaine and David Copperfield and everyone else named David.

ya anyways, I write raw code with TacoHTML Edit.
post #25 of 33
Quote:
Originally posted by Karl Kuehn
And if you can't be secure *shudder*, then RBrowser should also be considered. Not my favorite interface, but nice functionality.

Secure or not, RBrowser is my FTP/SFTP/SSH client of choice. It allows editing files of any type remotely, not just text. The interface is its only con (began life as an NEXTstep app IIRC).

Get into the office, sit down at my desk, open up RBrowser and my day begins
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post #26 of 33
I use BBEdit. I tried Dreamweaver and GoLive but found that I really preferred hand coding. Between the two I'd recommend Dreamweaver, I think it handled the code better then GoLive.
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post #27 of 33
I use dreamweaver as my preference, though I had started off with GoLive...Dreamweaver seems to code better for all browsers, and I find the layout of palettes and tools to be more logical than GoLive. I probably work on 25-30 different websites a day so that is my input...
post #28 of 33
Quote:
Originally posted by Res
I use BBEdit. I tried Dreamweaver and GoLive but found that I really preferred hand coding. Between the two I'd recommend Dreamweaver, I think it handled the code better then GoLive.

None of the two will touch your code if you write it externally, and import it...
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post #29 of 33
BBedit, for 8 years now. And I still keep using it. I fire up Dreamweaver MX2004 once in a while -wich is a good tool- but I'm always annoyed within 5 minutes to what it does in (and sometimes with) my code. But that's because BBedit'ers are used to total control.
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post #30 of 33
Thread Starter 
Are you BBedit users telling me I need to learn to code HTML? If so, any suggestions on the best way to go about this? I'm not disinterested, but I am clueless about writing code. Books? Courses?

And can some of you list some websites written with these programs? I'd love to see the sites written using specific software. I don't do anything fancy. My own stuff is very text oriented without tons of frills (ie. my website )

Thanks for all the feedback so far. It's been helpful. FUSION will work with Virtual PC so I may stick with that until I can decide what to do. In the meantime, it appears I should be learning to write HTML.
post #31 of 33
I've been a web designer/developer for almost 10 years and use Dreamweaver. I'm a hand coder and like that Dreamweaver gives me a visual idea of what's going on with the split code/design view. Code coloring is also a godsend over just a plain black text for differentiating between tags. The built-in FTP and site management features are real time savers.

As far as learning HTML or any other web language, some of the best tools are free! Dreamweaver comes with a quick start guide & some good tutorials. There are numerous websites that offer free tutorials (i.e. http://www.dmxzone.com/). As for books I like the desk reference variety over the "learn XXX in 21 days". The Dreamweaver Bible is a pretty good general DW book.

If your initial goal is to start with a basic website, the quick start & Macromedia supplied tutorial should easily have you up and running within a weekend. Dreamweaver has many built-in and downloadable extensions that allow creation of pages with point-click / Drag-drop simplicity. If you use the split view, you can see what code is being adding and where. This can also be a very valuable learning tool.

Dreamweaver, GoLive, and most others offer free 30 trial versions.
post #32 of 33
Thread Starter 
Thanks Math-Sux (I agree with you, by the way. Math does suck, except when there is a dollar sign involved.).

I'm a pretty quick learner, but can't say that hand coding strikes my fancy. Most everybody I talk with thinks Dreamweaver is the way to go, even if it is overkill for a lot of people.

I'm not into all the fluff that I find slow loading, even though more and more of us are using broadband. Flash and other stuff is not appealing to me, so those features are of no interest to me (yet).

It's like anything else, you get comfortable with whatever you've been using. Fusion is something I've worked in for over 4 years, so learning anything new will be cumbersome for awhile. My goal is to set about to learn a program worth learning so I can stick with it for a period of time. I don't like to fiddle with the latest software simply because it's the newest thing out there. I'd rather learn the nuances of a program that will do what I need, and keep learning to use it more effectively over time. (I might be wrong in that approach, but I'm not big on investing in all the newest software just so I can say I have it.)

Thanks, again.
post #33 of 33
Dreamweaver is a good call, especially for beginners learning html (it does all the work for you, but you can peep the html too).

BBedit is useful for things like PHP, due to syntax highlighting. I'll have to look into emacs (*shudder*).
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