or Connect
AppleInsider › Forums › Other Discussion › AppleOutsider › PoliticalOutsider › Why do they hate America?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Why do they hate America?

post #1 of 60
Thread Starter 
A book review in Foreign Affairs highlights "Anti-Americanism"

"L'ennemi americain: Genealogie de l'antiamericanisme francais. Philippe Roger. Paris: Seuil, 2002, 601 pp. 126.00.

...France remains the country in which anti-Americanism finds its most sophisticated intellectual expression in the West. This phenomenon persists despite the fact that few countries benefited more from the American security umbrella in the twentieth century.

...At a time when anti-Americanism is rising around the world and in France, and when, thanks to the prospect of war in Iraq, Americans are unusually interested in what France has to say, two distinguished French intellectuals have written what amount to anti-anti-American tracts.

L'obsession anti-americaine, by Jean-Francois Revel (best known in the United States as the author of Without Marx or Jesus), finds anti-Americanism to be a product of French political and moral failures. L'ennemi americain, by the well respected scholar Philippe Roger, traces the historical development of an anti-American discourse in France on both the right and the left over the past 200 years.

...These books are Franco-French products, intended to contribute to ongoing debates in France about France. They are not interested in what truths anti-Americanism reflects about America, or what Americans should do to minimize the power of visceral anti-American feeling around the world. Nevertheless, the non-French world should take note. What the authors have accomplished is to define what Roger calls a discourse of anti-Americanism: a free-floating but well defined set of ideas and perceptions that, over time, have crystallized into a coherent world view. Anti-Americanism in this sense is very different from opposition to some specific American policy; it is a systematic view of the United States as a danger to all one holds dear.

On the one hand, anti-Americanism is, as both Revel and Roger convincingly argue, a self-referential Franco-French phenomenon largely untroubled by larger questions of fact. On the other hand, the rise and persistence of this discourse reflects actual historical trends. Anti-Americanism developed and persisted in France because the United States thwarted, threatened, and diminished that country. Anti-Gallicism in the United States has had a fitful and shadowy life because France has only rarely risen to more than a nuisance in American eyes. In the realms of power politics, economics, and culture, French anti-Americanism is the psychological footprint of a conflict -- a conflict all the more irksome to the loser simply because the winner never seems to have paid it much attention..."

Well, why do they hate us?
post #2 of 60
Implicit in this is the belief that "they" "hate" "us" which is built on a multitude of half-truths, generalizations and projections that I have yet to see convincing proof for. Some Frenchies hate Americans, sure. But They, meaning all French? Most French? I seriously doubt it.

Many French (or Brits or <insert nationality>) take issue with the current administration's policies?

Hells yeah.

Now is a bad time to go back-packing the Middle East with an American flag badge sewn on one's backpack, but that doesn't mean everyone hates America. Please understand the distinction.
post #3 of 60
Quote:
Originally posted by 1337_5L4Xx0R
Implicit in this is the belief that "they" "hate" "us" which is built on a multitude of half-truths, generalizations and projections that I have yet to see convincing proof for. Some Frenchies hate Americans, sure. But They, meaning all French? Most French? I seriously doubt it.

Many French (or Brits or <insert nationality>) take issue with the current administration's policies?

Hells yeah.

Now is a bad time to go back-packing the Middle East with an American flag badge sewn on one's backpack, but that doesn't mean everyone hates America. Please understand the distinction.

winner.
orange you just glad?
Reply
orange you just glad?
Reply
post #4 of 60
The question should be, why does the US hate the French (with the caveat above)?

Why do the Murdoch papers trash the euro to the British people and regularly call Chirac a 'worm'?

Why does 'the US' keep saying the French hates the US, when it was US papers that called them 'cheese-eating surrender monkies' and changed the name of 'French fries' to 'freedom fries'?

Do you honestly think that the French papers EVER use hate-filled language like that, or that the French parliament would do something as pathetic and hate-filled as, say, ban burgers?

Do you think an American in Paris would be more or less welcome then a Parisian in America?

Clue: remember the invective on the street in the US in the run-up to war.

You are being told a lie. You are being made to believe that the French hate you, and that you should hate the French. Sure, they hate Bush; but hell, I hate the bastard and so does most of the planet.
meh
Reply
meh
Reply
post #5 of 60
Living in Paris (though not for much longer) this anti-US/anti-French issue is something I have never figured out.

I have lived all over Europe and I can honestly say that (imo) Framce is one of the most right-wing countries I have been unlucky enough to have experience of. Possible exception would be Italy - it even beats the UK which is saying one hell of a lot.

Sure, there are some vocal anti-Bush bashers in France (as everywhere) and the US left (again imo) latch on to these to bash the anti-French stance of many US wingers, thus elevating their importance far beyond what they intrinsically merit.

These same French 'intellectuals' all without exception supported the headscarf ban, a large percentage of them support Sarkozy (a politician somewhere to the extreme right of Mussolini and who will without doubt replace Chirac with a landslide majority) who enjoys almost saturation support amongst the general populace.

This is the nation that voted for Nazi Jean-Marie Le Pen to the degree he was runner-up in the national election. Tell me another country on the face of the planet that can trump that.

Racism and discrimination is endemic here (if not in institutionalised) and the police/army armed presence on the streets has reached saturation coverage.

And you have an extreme right leaning government bringing in discriminatory race laws. Do the math.

Sure some people hate Bush but that is a universal and in France's case mostly a reaction to the initial US attitude as Harald says. The thing is, the French just want the status quo and their own comfy, non-challenging life.

To them that means traditional cafes, few mass chains, no wars where someone (French) might get hurt and the general continuation of the 'French way of life' without disturbance.

Bush's policies lead in the opposite direction and he tried to get Europe on board - that's the only problem. There's no hate and if Bush hadn't messed up (as with so many other things) they'd be natural allies and best of chums.

The schism, such as it is, is just one more example of Bush failing to organise an orgy in a brothel on his father's gold Amex.
What is Faith? When your good deed pleases you and your evil deed grieves you, you are a believer. What is Sin? When a thing disturbs the peace of your heart, give it up - Prophet Muhammad
Reply
What is Faith? When your good deed pleases you and your evil deed grieves you, you are a believer. What is Sin? When a thing disturbs the peace of your heart, give it up - Prophet Muhammad
Reply
post #6 of 60
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally posted by Harald
The question should be, why does the US hate the French (with the caveat above)?

Why do the Murdoch papers trash the euro to the British people and regularly call Chirac a 'worm'?

Why does 'the US' keep saying the French hates the US, when it was US papers that called them 'cheese-eating surrender monkies' and changed the name of 'French fries' to 'freedom fries'?

Do you honestly think that the French papers EVER use hate-filled language like that, or that the French parliament would do something as pathetic and hate-filled as, say, ban burgers?

Do you think an American in Paris would be more or less welcome then a Parisian in America?

Clue: remember the invective on the street in the US in the run-up to war.

You are being told a lie. You are being made to believe that the French hate you, and that you should hate the French. Sure, they hate Bush; but hell, I hate the bastard and so does most of the planet.

You ought to note that the review was of two new French books, both by respected intellectuals within France. Theyve identified the obsession with anti-Americanism.

One would have to have a very crabbed view, limited to recent history, to ignore that Europeans, in particular the French, have had a long history of obsessive anti-Americanism. Resentment of the leadership role of the United States in post-war Europe drove the French to leave the NATO military command and DeGaul to bitterly announce that America cared no more about the liberation of France than the Soviet Union cared about the liberation of Poland an intemperate absurdity, particularly egregious because it was made by an allied leader in the cold war.

According to Revel, French interest in America becomes a frenzy at the first report of bad news such as a rise in the unemployment rate. For days the French press will predict some dire end of Americas economic role. It is routine for the French to view the United States as the land of jungle capitalism, a place that is ruled by only the few super-rich. They consider American diversity ideas to have failed, and tout their dubious successes at integration. And the French continually lash out against American business as either uncouth or unfair, as they are empowered by too much money.

As I recall, more recently, 113 French intellectuals signed a hit peace, warning the world of an evil much greater than terrorism: the United States.

This started long before Bush.
post #7 of 60
Quote:
Originally posted by MaxParrish
As I recall, more recently, 113 French intellectuals signed a hit peace, warning the world of an evil much greater than terrorism: the United States.

This started long before Bush.

Sure. We're a superpower that often supports tyrannical regimes with financial, military, and political influence; exploits other countries with "free-trade" agreements; quickly consumes the world's natural resources, polluting more than its fair share. I would agree to that statement. We have more power to change the world than terrorists can dream of. In that regard-- terrorism isn't the problem-- the issues underlying terrorism are the problem. And we have more power to help mitigate or exacerbate those issues than anyone. Historically, we've mainly prodded up terrorism.
post #8 of 60
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally posted by ShawnJ
Sure. We're a superpower that often supports tyrannical regimes with financial, military, and political influence; exploits other countries with "free-trade" agreements; quickly consumes the world's natural resources, polluting more than its fair share. I would agree to that statement. We have more power to change the world than terrorists can dream of. In that regard-- terrorism isn't the problem-- the issues underlying terrorism are the problem. And we have more power to help mitigate or exacerbate those issues than anyone. Historically, we've mainly prodded up terrorism.

Assuming you are not French, at least your opinions are not hypocritical. Given that France supported Saddam in the Iran-Iraq war (providing a major portion of his arms), helped make a mess of Zaire and Rhwanda, and 'historically' had more than its fair share of colonialism (e.g. Indochina) and brutality (Algeria) one wonders about the real source of the visceral dislike of American society and politics.

BTW, I got the story a little wrong:

"A group of 113 French intellectuals launched an appeal against the "imperial crusade" in Afghanistan: "In the name of the law and morality of the jungle" (not because 3,000 people had been murdered), "the Western armada administers its divine justice." Of course, if any parties in this entire affair believed themselves to be divine, it was the Islamists--the kind that murders thousands of innocent civilians in the name of Allah, or the kind that, in Nigeria and Sudan, massacres Christians for being unwilling to submit to sharia. In two months alone, several hundred Nigerian Christians were exterminated by Muslims. Our 113 intellectuals had nothing to say about it." Revel
post #9 of 60
freedom fries!!!!!!!!!! the most stupid thing america may have ever done, ok at least one of the most stupid things
post #10 of 60
Quote:
Originally posted by burningwheel
freedom fries!!!!!!!!!! the most stupid thing america may have ever done, ok at least one of the most stupid things

You can get "W" ketchup to go with them now....
What is Faith? When your good deed pleases you and your evil deed grieves you, you are a believer. What is Sin? When a thing disturbs the peace of your heart, give it up - Prophet Muhammad
Reply
What is Faith? When your good deed pleases you and your evil deed grieves you, you are a believer. What is Sin? When a thing disturbs the peace of your heart, give it up - Prophet Muhammad
Reply
post #11 of 60
Quote:
Originally posted by burningwheel
freedom fries!!!!!!!!!! the most stupid thing america may have ever done, ok at least one of the most stupid things

I always thought the ironic backfire of that joke. If you extend the Words Freedom to replace French and France, then you end up renaming France Freedom land.(or something to that effect
orange you just glad?
Reply
orange you just glad?
Reply
post #12 of 60
Quote:
Originally posted by segovius
You can get "W" ketchup to go with them now....

. . .pulpy red stuff made from crushed nightshades into a stewlike gruel, a virtually thin, runny vegetable . . . n'est-pas?!
"They never stop thinking about new ways to harm our country and our people, and neither do we."
--George W Bush

"Narrative is what starts to happen after eight minutes
--Franklin Miller.

"Nothing...

Reply
"They never stop thinking about new ways to harm our country and our people, and neither do we."
--George W Bush

"Narrative is what starts to happen after eight minutes
--Franklin Miller.

"Nothing...

Reply
post #13 of 60
At least people can avoid buying Heinz. People canĀ“t avoid buying Haliburton because your government is doing it for you.
"I reject your reality and substitute it with my own" - President Bush
Reply
"I reject your reality and substitute it with my own" - President Bush
Reply
post #14 of 60
We don't hate you, stupid. We're not, (have never ever been) anti-American.
We just hate your president and his stupid propaganda.
I'm The Boss... This Is Champaign...
Merry Christmas !
Reply
I'm The Boss... This Is Champaign...
Merry Christmas !
Reply
post #15 of 60
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally posted by pierr_alex
We don't hate you, stupid. We're not, (have never ever been) anti-American.
We just hate your president and his stupid propaganda.

From Stupid,

Of course you're not, that's self evident.
post #16 of 60
<under the ever-watchful eye of the mods>
post #17 of 60
Quote:
Originally posted by segovius
You can get "W" ketchup to go with them now....

i'm ashamed to be an american
post #18 of 60
I'll tell you why they hate us. A guy walked in to Sears today and he's like "Kerry has a face I don't trust." That's why. Americans are stupid.
"Overpopulation and climate change are serious shit." Gilsch
"I was really curious how they had managed such fine granularity of alienation." addabox
Reply
"Overpopulation and climate change are serious shit." Gilsch
"I was really curious how they had managed such fine granularity of alienation." addabox
Reply
post #19 of 60
Quote:
Originally posted by Aquatic
I'll tell you why they hate us. A guy walked in to Sears today and he's like "Kerry has a face I don't trust." That's why. Americans are stupid.

I've heard that before, actually disturbingly enough, I've heard it a bunch from people all over the country(both first hand and otherwise) stuff like "I can't vote for kerry, I look at him, I just don't like the way he looks" or "I just don't feel like I can trust him" or "he's just the type of person you don't think you can trust"

of course, I highly doubt that these voters are so vane in their reasoning, additionally, I've also heard a good wealth of people say the same things about bush(or more note worthy and consistently about cheney)

Not exactly a standard to judge anything by, but it is a lame thing to hear, especially if there is any truth in it.
orange you just glad?
Reply
orange you just glad?
Reply
post #20 of 60
People are like that all over the world . . . . probably even in Iceland . . .
"They never stop thinking about new ways to harm our country and our people, and neither do we."
--George W Bush

"Narrative is what starts to happen after eight minutes
--Franklin Miller.

"Nothing...

Reply
"They never stop thinking about new ways to harm our country and our people, and neither do we."
--George W Bush

"Narrative is what starts to happen after eight minutes
--Franklin Miller.

"Nothing...

Reply
post #21 of 60
Quote:
Originally posted by Harald
Do you think an American in Paris would be more or less welcome then a Parisian in America?

Clue: remember the invective on the street in the US in the run-up to war.

You are being told a lie. You are being made to believe that the French hate you, and that you should hate the French. Sure, they hate Bush; but hell, I hate the bastard and so does most of the planet.

Hell ya the French hate us. I experienced that first hand 6 years ago when I went to France. Treated like shit simply because we were Americans. Not only in Paris but other parts of France, too. Had no problems in any other European country we went to; just France. Also had a guide from Belgium who explained why they were doing some of the things they did.

I've also had relatives who had problems with the French when they visited. No problems anywhere else, though.

As far as French in America: I befriended quite a few while they were here, and I don't know a single person who would treat a Frenchman like crap simply because they were French.
post #22 of 60
.
post #23 of 60
Quote:
Originally posted by X X
Hell ya the French hate us. I experienced that first hand 6 years ago when I went to France. Treated like shit simply because we were Americans. Not only in Paris but other parts of France, too. Had no problems in any other European country we went to; just France. Also had a guide from Belgium who explained why they were doing some of the things they did.

I've also had relatives who had problems with the French when they visited. No problems anywhere else, though.

As far as French in America: I befriended quite a few while they were here, and I don't know a single person who would treat a Frenchman like crap simply because they were French.

Maybe you're not a very nice person and you have no friends anywhere ;-)
P.S. So what did your Belgium guide revealed you...?
I'm The Boss... This Is Champaign...
Merry Christmas !
Reply
I'm The Boss... This Is Champaign...
Merry Christmas !
Reply
post #24 of 60
I am sorry to say this, Max Parrish but french people are more interested by the latest soccer match, or by their beloved reality TV show than by the US.

Bush is not very popular here, but is not popular in others european countries either (do not speak of the governements here).

Saying that french hate US is grossly overexagerated. Some leftist intellectuals think so, because US represant the capitalist countrie by excellence. The left is not the majority of france, and the intellectuals are a very small part of the population ...

If french, hate so much US, how do you explain that US attract so many french people ?


Segovius. I disagree with your statement about the extremely right winded mussolinian Sarkozy. For me it's a joke. I could not let you write this without noticing. Feel free to elaborate, but I fear that nobody here, will be interested by this discussion.
post #25 of 60
Quote:
Originally posted by Powerdoc
Feel free to elaborate, but I fear that nobody here, will be interested by this discussion.

Well, I have to agree there - I know when I'm beaten so I'll leave Sarkozy out of it. I don't think even I could handle it actually
What is Faith? When your good deed pleases you and your evil deed grieves you, you are a believer. What is Sin? When a thing disturbs the peace of your heart, give it up - Prophet Muhammad
Reply
What is Faith? When your good deed pleases you and your evil deed grieves you, you are a believer. What is Sin? When a thing disturbs the peace of your heart, give it up - Prophet Muhammad
Reply
post #26 of 60
Quote:
Originally posted by MaxParrish
A book review in Foreign Affairs highlights "Anti-Americanism"

"L'ennemi americain: Genealogie de l'antiamericanisme francais. Philippe Roger. Paris: Seuil, 2002, 601 pp. 126.00.

...France remains the country in which anti-Americanism finds its most sophisticated intellectual expression in the West. This phenomenon persists despite the fact that few countries benefited more from the American security umbrella in the twentieth century.

...At a time when anti-Americanism is rising around the world and in France, and when, thanks to the prospect of war in Iraq, Americans are unusually interested in what France has to say, two distinguished French intellectuals have written what amount to anti-anti-American tracts.

L'obsession anti-americaine, by Jean-Francois Revel (best known in the United States as the author of Without Marx or Jesus), finds anti-Americanism to be a product of French political and moral failures. L'ennemi americain, by the well respected scholar Philippe Roger, traces the historical development of an anti-American discourse in France on both the right and the left over the past 200 years.

...These books are Franco-French products, intended to contribute to ongoing debates in France about France. They are not interested in what truths anti-Americanism reflects about America, or what Americans should do to minimize the power of visceral anti-American feeling around the world. Nevertheless, the non-French world should take note. What the authors have accomplished is to define what Roger calls a discourse of anti-Americanism: a free-floating but well defined set of ideas and perceptions that, over time, have crystallized into a coherent world view. Anti-Americanism in this sense is very different from opposition to some specific American policy; it is a systematic view of the United States as a danger to all one holds dear.

On the one hand, anti-Americanism is, as both Revel and Roger convincingly argue, a self-referential Franco-French phenomenon largely untroubled by larger questions of fact. On the other hand, the rise and persistence of this discourse reflects actual historical trends. Anti-Americanism developed and persisted in France because the United States thwarted, threatened, and diminished that country. Anti-Gallicism in the United States has had a fitful and shadowy life because France has only rarely risen to more than a nuisance in American eyes. In the realms of power politics, economics, and culture, French anti-Americanism is the psychological footprint of a conflict -- a conflict all the more irksome to the loser simply because the winner never seems to have paid it much attention..."

Well, why do they hate us?


God! You really don't get it do you?

Bush didn't do anything for our image with that little gesture of attack first find the reason to attack later.

If we keep that up we'll be the loser. It could easily be that in 100 years we could be a has been major power. Why? Because nobody would do business with us because they don't trust us.

1950's logic where we are the only player on the field just won't work anymore. We have to learn to be respectful and play nice.
Without the need for difference or a need to always follow the herd breeds complacency, mediocrity, and a lack of imagination
Reply
Without the need for difference or a need to always follow the herd breeds complacency, mediocrity, and a lack of imagination
Reply
post #27 of 60
Quote:
Originally posted by X X
Hell ya the French hate us. I experienced that first hand 6 years ago when I went to France. Treated like shit simply because we were Americans. Not only in Paris but other parts of France, too. Had no problems in any other European country we went to; just France. Also had a guide from Belgium who explained why they were doing some of the things they did.

I've also had relatives who had problems with the French when they visited. No problems anywhere else, though.

As far as French in America: I befriended quite a few while they were here, and I don't know a single person who would treat a Frenchman like crap simply because they were French.

Do you speak any French? I've been to France three times and seen the majority of the country and on every occasion I've had to interact with French people, from public officials to rural families, they were kind and gracious to me. On a few occasions I was literally welcomed into someone's home once they found out I was American. This is not to say that people weren't sometimes rude, but for the love of god, try walking across Manhattan sometime and see how people react to you. I've talked to all kinds of Americans who shared your sentiments about the French people and it's been my experience that if you dig enough they were (perhaps unintentionally) rude themselves. And yes, speaking only English in a foreign country and expecting to be understood is rude.
post #28 of 60
Quote:
Originally posted by pierr_alex
Maybe you're not a very nice person and you have no friends anywhere ;-)
P.S. So what did your Belgium guide revealed you...?

I vaguely remember what he said, but it had something to do with the French veiwing Americans as lazy, flaunting their money, and having poor dining habits. Also, I think he mentioned something about how Americans don't know a bit of French and talk to the French like they should know English.
post #29 of 60
Quote:
Originally posted by a10t2
And yes, speaking only English in a foreign country and expecting to be understood is rude.

I fully understand that, which is why my brother did most of the talking, (he spoke a little French), and we attempted to speak French whenever we could. However, my language is German (not too well anymore) and when I went to Germany it seemed to me the Germans couldn't care less whether I spoke German or not, and only spoke English even when I did speak German.
post #30 of 60
Quote:
Originally posted by X X
However, my language is German (not too well anymore) and when I went to Germany it seemed to me the Germans couldn't care less whether I spoke German or not, and only spoke English even when I did speak German.

That's exactly the experience I had in France; people who spoke English were proud to show it off.

How exactly were you treated like shit in France?
post #31 of 60
Quote:
Originally posted by X X
I fully understand that, which is why my brother did most of the talking, (he spoke a little French), and we attempted to speak French whenever we could. However, my language is German (not too well anymore) and when I went to Germany it seemed to me the Germans couldn't care less whether I spoke German or not, and only spoke English even when I did speak German.

Well here is my personal opinon about talking :

People are always pleased to see somebody trying to speak their own language, but manytimes they could not resist to the pleasure to show that they speak the language of the foreigner.
When I met an english people, I like to speak english with it : it's not because I find his french sucks, but because I am so happy to be able to speak english.
post #32 of 60
Quote:
Originally posted by X X
Hell ya the French hate us. I experienced that first hand 6 years ago when I went to France. Treated like shit simply because we were Americans. Not only in Paris but other parts of France, too. Had no problems in any other European country we went to; just France. Also had a guide from Belgium who explained why they were doing some of the things they did.

I've also had relatives who had problems with the French when they visited. No problems anywhere else, though.

As far as French in America: I befriended quite a few while they were here, and I don't know a single person who would treat a Frenchman like crap simply because they were French.

I guess you where unlucky, there is bad people everywhere. If I met an american or any foreigner I will try to be nice with him, because I think it's very important to give a good image of your self or your countrie.

I went to the Guadeloupe Caraiban island last year. People told me and my wife, that this people where arrogant. I did not find it, they where nice, but I try to be respectful with people. I don't say it wasn't your case, but beware that unconsciously you negative feelings.
post #33 of 60
Quote:
Originally posted by a10t2
That's exactly the experience I had in France; people who spoke English were proud to show it off.

How exactly were you treated like shit in France?

The first currency exchange place we went to the guy tried ripping me off. When I caught it, I simply went back up to him and politely show him the "mistake" he gave me this evil look and tossed the rest of the money on the counter. We were put upstairs away from everyone else in restaurants and in one instance being ignored (fortunately we had our Belgian friend at the time) until the Belgian spoke up. We also got kicked out of a youth hostile. We had stayed their one night and weren't allowed to sign up again for another night.

We were only there for four days and didn't have a whole lot of interaction because we spent a lot of time on the road, but when we did it wasn't the best experience.
post #34 of 60
Quote:
Originally posted by Powerdoc
I guess you where unlucky, there is bad people everywhere. If I met an american or any foreigner I will try to be nice with him, because I think it's very important to give a good image of your self or your countrie.

I went to the Guadeloupe Caraiban island last year. People told me and my wife, that this people where arrogant. I did not find it, they where nice, but I try to be respectful with people. I don't say it wasn't your case, but beware that unconsciously you negative feelings.

I guess I was. I understand there are plenty of great Frenchmen. We were advised to speak French or try and speak French (they would help you if you attempted to speak their language) before we went, which is why my brother did most of the talking and that Belgian tagged along for a bit, but the behaviour in France was a stark contrast from how we were treated in the other countries.
post #35 of 60
Quote:
Originally posted by X X
We also got kicked out of a youth hostile.

well what do you expect
What is Faith? When your good deed pleases you and your evil deed grieves you, you are a believer. What is Sin? When a thing disturbs the peace of your heart, give it up - Prophet Muhammad
Reply
What is Faith? When your good deed pleases you and your evil deed grieves you, you are a believer. What is Sin? When a thing disturbs the peace of your heart, give it up - Prophet Muhammad
Reply
post #36 of 60
Quote:
Originally posted by segovius
well what do you expect

???

[edit] Nevermind, I see what you mean. LOL!
post #37 of 60
Quote:
Originally posted by X X
Hell ya the French hate us. I experienced that first hand 6 years ago when I went to France. Treated like shit simply because we were Americans. Not only in Paris but other parts of France, too. Had no problems in any other European country we went to; just France. Also had a guide from Belgium who explained why they were doing some of the things they did.

I've also had relatives who had problems with the French when they visited. No problems anywhere else, though.

As far as French in America: I befriended quite a few while they were here, and I don't know a single person who would treat a Frenchman like crap simply because they were French.

uhh If you were treated poorly it is most likely because you were crude and tasteless.

I was in Paris and my friend and I had the best hospitality you can imagine from the people in France.

We were looking at a map and this very kind young woman came up to us and helped us. She spoke English and helped us to find our way.

In all the places we went the French people spoke english as well and this was very good for us as we do not speak French.

When I arrived at Paris at CDG airport the process was very professional and welcoming.

When I returned to America via. Atlanta Hartsfield I never felt so unwelcome and this was in my home country. There were endless lines like you are cattle on the way to slaughter and large signs everywhere that say "KEEP MAD COW DISEASE OUT OF AMERICA" and other nice things like that. It felt very confrontational to come back to this place called america.

The employees at Hartsfield were loud, crude, annoying, and 95% of them were morbidly obese.

in Paris the employees at CDG were very intelliigent, quiet, and helpful..

I actually felt more at home in Paris than I do here in America

Fellowship
May the peace of the Lord be with you always

Share your smile, Have respect for others, and be loving to all peoples

Paul in Athens: Acts 17 : 16-34
Reply
May the peace of the Lord be with you always

Share your smile, Have respect for others, and be loving to all peoples

Paul in Athens: Acts 17 : 16-34
Reply
post #38 of 60
Quote:
Originally posted by X X
???

Apologies - know I shouldn't have but I couldn't resist. The idea of a Youth Hostile where they kick you out seemed so...Pythonesque.

Btw, Fellowship is right about Paris - civilization and politeness are unparalleled - and rudeness too !
What is Faith? When your good deed pleases you and your evil deed grieves you, you are a believer. What is Sin? When a thing disturbs the peace of your heart, give it up - Prophet Muhammad
Reply
What is Faith? When your good deed pleases you and your evil deed grieves you, you are a believer. What is Sin? When a thing disturbs the peace of your heart, give it up - Prophet Muhammad
Reply
post #39 of 60
Quote:
Originally posted by Fellowship
uhh If you were treated poorly it is most likely because you were crude and tasteless.

We were not "crude and tasteless". We put more effort into being "accepted" in France than we did in any other country specifically because of the warnings we had received before going. Our so called "crude and tasteless" tact didn't generate any bad behaviour in any other country except France, then.
post #40 of 60
Quote:
Originally posted by segovius
Apologies - know I shouldn't have but I couldn't resist. The idea of a Youth Hostile where they kick you out seemed so...Pythonesque.

Btw, Fellowship is right about Paris - civilization and politeness are unparalleled - and rudeness too !

I understood what you meant after I read more closely. Just took me a second.

There are plenty of nice Europeans, and I'm certain that many of the Americans who have been treated like crap probably deserved it.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: PoliticalOutsider
AppleInsider › Forums › Other Discussion › AppleOutsider › PoliticalOutsider › Why do they hate America?