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Chalabi wanted for murder.

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 
http://www.cnn.com/2004/WORLD/meast/....ap/index.html

The Bush admin's go to man from the middle east. Nice.
"[Saddam's] a bad guy. He's a terrible guy and he should go. But I don't think it's worth 800 troops dead, 4500 wounded -- some of them terribly -- $200 billion of our treasury and counting, and...
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"[Saddam's] a bad guy. He's a terrible guy and he should go. But I don't think it's worth 800 troops dead, 4500 wounded -- some of them terribly -- $200 billion of our treasury and counting, and...
Reply
post #2 of 18
Amazing isn't it? This guy was literally a rock star at Rumsfeld's Pentagon.

By the way, has anybody seen Rummy lately? Could he be under lock and key at Cheney's bunker?
post #3 of 18
He was spotted last night going to see HAROLD & KUMAR GO TO WHITE CASTLE and commented afterward that he thought it was "darn funny".

His wife then asked if he wanted to go out for ice cream and he said "ok".
But was heard muttering to her that he couldn't stay out late because "tomorrow he had to mow that bastard Cheney's lawn".
post #4 of 18
Which Chalabi is wanted for what? You did read the first paragraph before posting? Or are you "knowingly misleading" us into a thread!
post #5 of 18
Quote:
Originally posted by Scott
Which Chalabi is wanted for what? You did read the first paragraph before posting? Or are you "knowingly misleading" us into a thread!

Yes, Scott, it's Ahmed Chalabi's nephew that is wanted for murder. Our guy is merely wanted for money laundering and counterfeiting.

So that's all right then!
They spoke of the sayings and doings of their commander, the grand duke, and told stories of his kindness and irascibility.
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They spoke of the sayings and doings of their commander, the grand duke, and told stories of his kindness and irascibility.
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post #6 of 18
Quote:
Originally posted by addabox
Our guy...

Not our guy; scott's guy.

According to him Chalabi is just getting framed over and over and over and over and over again. Some people just have all the bad luck.
post #7 of 18
i think scott's point is pretty valid, the thread title is misleading.
post #8 of 18
Scott's right.

Ahmed Chalabi is wanted for counterfeiting.
His nephew Salem Chalabi is wanted for murder.
By the way, Salem Chalabi is not a nobody. He is head of the tribunal handling the trial of Saddam Hussein.
post #9 of 18
Quote:
Originally posted by tonton
By the way, Salem Chalabi is not a nobody. He is head of the tribunal handling the trial of Saddam Hussein.

He's also business partners with Feith's former law partner, Marc Zell.

All of this might also have something to do with Scott's favorite Iraqi politician aligning himself with the US's #1 political enemy in Iraq.
post #10 of 18
The Chalabis are surely a family of crooks!
Two Chalabi brothers, Hazem and Jawad have been convicted by Swiss authorities of false accounting.....and Ahmed himself was convicted in absentia by Jordanian authorities of banking fraud.

http://www.smh.com.au/articles/2003/...?oneclick=true

And the US approved Iraqi PM Allawi is alleged to have terrorist ties, and is also accused to the cold blooded murder of 6 inmates...

Its no surprise that such lowlife are favored by the Pentagon and Bush Administration. Criminals tend to associate.
"We've never made the case, or argued the case that somehow Osama bin Laden was directly involved in 9/11. That evidence has never been forthcoming". VP Cheney, 3/29/2006. Interview by Tony Snow
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"We've never made the case, or argued the case that somehow Osama bin Laden was directly involved in 9/11. That evidence has never been forthcoming". VP Cheney, 3/29/2006. Interview by Tony Snow
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post #11 of 18
Woooops. Boy? The anti-democracy hold outs in Iraq say "Jump!" you all say "How high?!"

Maybe this will help the anti-Bush and anti-US folks in this thread realize that everything is not so black and white.

The Chalabi Fiasco Continued

Quote:
Same target, new smear.

Wednesday, August 11, 2004 12:01 a.m. EDT

It's hard to see how the weekend arrest warrants for Ahmed Chalabi and his nephew Salem Chalabi advance the rule of law and the cause of justice in Iraq.

If nothing else, they raise the question of judicial priorities. Moqtada al Sadr, after all, remains on the loose. And despite the recent pounding his Mahdi militia has been taking from American forces, there is no indication that Iraq's new government intends to enforce its arrest warrant for the cleric himself.

Meanwhile, Iraq's Central Bank Governor has said that he issued no counterfeiting complaint against Ahmed Chalabi, contrary to the claims of the accusing judge in this case. As for the murder charges the same judge has levied against Salem--a respected lawyer in charge of the tribunal prosecuting Saddam and his henchmen--even Ahmed's enemies say they find them incredible.

...
post #12 of 18
Quote:
Originally posted by Scott
anti-US folks

Who's that then?
post #13 of 18
Poor, unlucky chalabi. He must have some really bad karma from a past life.
post #14 of 18
Or maybe a formerly powerful anti-Semitic dictatorship was out to get him?
post #15 of 18
Quote:
Originally posted by kneelbeforezod
Who's that then?

I think I can reasonably support that SJO is anti-american. She consistently tells or retells slanderous anti-US lies.
post #16 of 18
Quote:
Originally posted by Scott
Woooops. Boy? The anti-democracy hold outs in Iraq say "Jump!" you all say "How high?!"

Maybe this will help the anti-Bush and anti-US folks in this thread realize that everything is not so black and white.

The Chalabi Fiasco Continued

Quote:
Wednesday, August 11, 2004 12:01 a.m. EDT

It's hard to see how the weekend arrest warrants for Ahmed Chalabi and his nephew Salem Chalabi advance the rule of law and the cause of justice in Iraq.

If nothing else, they raise the question of judicial priorities. Moqtada al Sadr, after all, remains on the loose. And despite the recent pounding his Mahdi militia has been taking from American forces, there is no indication that Iraq's new government intends to enforce its arrest warrant for the cleric himself.

Meanwhile, Iraq's Central Bank Governor has said that he issued no counterfeiting complaint against Ahmed Chalabi, contrary to the claims of the accusing judge in this case. As for the murder charges the same judge has levied against Salem--a respected lawyer in charge of the tribunal prosecuting Saddam and his henchmen--even Ahmed's enemies say they find them incredible.

OK, look at it your way. It's evidence that the installation of a vibrant democracy that shall be as a shining light to the benighted isn't going so well. In fact, if this is true, it sounds like the Iraqi "leadership" are shaping up to be just another corrupt, despotic regime that uses extra-legal means to achieve its ends.

Which is of course justifies all the damage done.
They spoke of the sayings and doings of their commander, the grand duke, and told stories of his kindness and irascibility.
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They spoke of the sayings and doings of their commander, the grand duke, and told stories of his kindness and irascibility.
Reply
post #17 of 18
Quote:
Originally posted by addabox
OK, look at it your way. It's evidence that the installation of a vibrant democracy that shall be as a shining light to the benighted isn't going so well. In fact, if this is true, it sounds like the Iraqi "leadership" are shaping up to be just another corrupt, despotic regime that uses extra-legal means to achieve its ends.

Which is of course justifies all the damage done.

How's this for a Beacon Of Freedom:

Quote:
The transfer of sovereignty to a hand-picked cabinet in Iraq has done little to halt shameless prisoner abuse in the ailing nation, it seems. But instead of American G.I.s doing the damage, it's the new Iraqi authorities. And this time, they're not taking photographs. An article in yesterday's Oregonian details how a group of Oregon national guardsmen discovered an Iraqi torture den just after the late-June power switch.

The guardsmen, determined to ameliorate the black eye the armed services in Iraq suffered after Abu Ghraib, called in help, administered first aid and demanded answers from the Iraqi guards on hand.

"Some of the detainees said they had been held for three days with little water and no food. 'Many of these prisoners had bruises and cuts and belt or hose marks all over,' [Capt. Jarrell] Southall said. At least one had a gunshot wound to the knee.

"'I witnessed prisoners who were barely able to walk,' Southall said.

"The Oregon soldiers moved the prisoners into the shade of a nearby wall, cut them loose and handed out water bottles. They administered first aid when necessary and gave intravenous fluids to at least one dehydrated prisoner.

"At about that time, U.S. military police arrived on the scene and began disarming the Iraqi policemen and moving them farther away from the prisoners, according to Southall.

"As U.S. soldiers continued to fan out in the building, they found more bound-and-gagged prisoners, and "hoses, broken lamps and chemicals of some variety," which could have been used as torture devices, Southall said.

"Hendrickson radioed up the chain of command in the Army's 1st Cavalry Division, relaying what he had seen and asking for instructions. As the soldiers waited, Southall said, the Iraqi policemen began to get "defiant and hostile" toward the Americans.

"It wasn't long before the order came: Stand down. Return the prisoners to the Iraqi authorities and leave the detention yard."

So with a hasty power transfer already completed, the Americans couldn't do anything about it. But we doubt most Iraqis will be in the mood to make those kinds of distinctions. "'Iraqis want us to respect their sovereignty, but the problem is we will be blamed for leaving the fox in charge of the henhouse,' said Michael Rubin, a former adviser to the interim Iraqi government who is now a scholar at the American Enterprise Institute. "We did not generally put good people in.'"

I think that they have had years of uninterupted training . . . and recently, from an International team of trainers.
"They never stop thinking about new ways to harm our country and our people, and neither do we."
--George W Bush

"Narrative is what starts to happen after eight minutes
--Franklin Miller.

"Nothing...

Reply
"They never stop thinking about new ways to harm our country and our people, and neither do we."
--George W Bush

"Narrative is what starts to happen after eight minutes
--Franklin Miller.

"Nothing...

Reply
post #18 of 18
oh yeah . . . from HERE . . . down the page a ways.
"They never stop thinking about new ways to harm our country and our people, and neither do we."
--George W Bush

"Narrative is what starts to happen after eight minutes
--Franklin Miller.

"Nothing...

Reply
"They never stop thinking about new ways to harm our country and our people, and neither do we."
--George W Bush

"Narrative is what starts to happen after eight minutes
--Franklin Miller.

"Nothing...

Reply
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