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New Tiger builds include Address Book sharing, PDF bookmarking, more

post #1 of 32
Thread Starter 
New builds of Apple's Mac OS X Tiger operating system are beginning to surface with dozens of previously unpublicized features.

The first external builds of Mac OS X Tiger to leave Cupertino in recent months are packing new features. Sources have already provided details on Jabber iChat support, parental controls, and RSS feed customization. Additional enhancements are said to include Address Book sharing, PDF bookmarking, and incremental Energy Saver settings.

Screenshots: Address Sharing; Address Backup; iTunes Screensaver

The latest developmental versions of Address Book--the centralized repository for contact information in Mac OS X--have revealed support for both sharing and backup of contacts. Through a new preference panel, users can add or send invites to other users, allowing them to view or edit contacts present in their address book. Likewise, the addition of a second preference panel will aid users in backing up their contact listings on a daily or weekly basis.

Screenshots: Preview; Security; iCal Groups; iCal Prefs

Tiger's version of Preview is another Mac OS X application that is reflecting significant changes. According to sources, the new version sports text annotation capabilities and PDF bookmarking. A text annotation tool will encapsulates PDF content in red ovals and let the user record comments, while a new Bookmarks application menu provides instant access to specific PDF document pages.

Screenshots: Energy Saver; Crash Dialog; Preview Tools

A revised version of Tiger's Energy Saver application now displays six new settings buttons, each capable of retaining its own set of customized power management preferences. Users may reportedly use the new feature to denote incremental energy saver preferences, ranging from "Better Battery Life" to "Better Performance."

Screenshots: Sharing Panel; Graphing Calculator 1; Graphing Calculator 2; Graphing Calculator 3

The latest builds of Mac OS X Tiger also include file sharing capabilities for host machines running off Dynamic DNS or Apple's Xsan Network file system. Meanwhile, additions to Tiger's "Screensavers" and "Security" preference panes have unveiled a new iTunes album art screensaver and an option to encrypt memory when its being swapped to disk, respectively.

Among several other noticeable additions, the new Tiger builds reveal a brand new Mac OS X Graphing Calculator application, iCal calendar groups, and an enhanced dialog that provides bug report and safe relaunch options following an unexpected application crash.
post #2 of 32
Yes! Oh god, yes! Address Book sharing, 'show birthdays calender', PDF bookmarking and annotation, Xgrid, Xsan!!!

The graphing calculator still looks rough around the edges...it's clear the toolbar icons are placeholders but it looks pretty sweet.
post #3 of 32
This looks really nice, especially the graphing calculator. Once I saw the pictures of the graphing calculator I knew they were familiar. It looks like Curvus Pro X, a graphing calculator produced by Arizona. After noticing this, I went to the website and discovered an interesting little tidbit. "On July 22, 2004 Curvus Pro X was bought by an international company and its distribution has been discontinued. It is therefore not possible any longer to download nor to buy any kind of registration license for this program." http://www.curvuspro.ch/osx/en/index.html As far as I figure Apple must have bought the rights to the program so that they could include it in Tiger. I am glad to see this as Curvus Pro X was a great graphing application.
post #4 of 32
Quote:
Originally posted by Eagleeye87
This looks really nice, especially the graphing calculator. Once I saw the pictures of the graphing calculator I knew they were familiar. It looks like Curvus Pro X, a graphing calculator produced by Arizona. After noticing this, I went to the website and discovered an interesting little tidbit. "On July 22, 2004 Curvus Pro X was bought by an international company and its distribution has been discontinued. It is therefore not possible any longer to download nor to buy any kind of registration license for this program." http://www.curvuspro.ch/osx/en/index.html As far as I figure Apple must have bought the rights to the program so that they could include it in Tiger. I am glad to see this as Curvus Pro X was a great graphing application.

Are some of the toolbar icons from the Curvus Pro X app? Like the blue Aqua toolset in the left part of the toolbar?

edit: heh...it's exactly Curvus Pro X but with the brushed-metal interface.
post #5 of 32
Wow, the graphing calculator's (beta) interface looks absolutely horrible.

I guess this goes to show how bad software can be prior to adequate apple polish.
post #6 of 32
This is looking more and more like Apple is going to deliver a very major upgrade to OS X. It's going to drive MS nuts that they are falling so far behind, especially when it comes to Spotlight. The graphing calculator will add some kick to students and some scientists.

The real issue for me is that Apple continues to move forward with major steps in both software and hardware. All with "only" 2% of the market share.
Ken
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Ken
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post #7 of 32
What is meant by iCal calendar groups? Perhaps multiple people could hav access to a calendar for editing? Please elaborate if possible.
post #8 of 32
Quote:
Originally posted by kenaustus
This is looking more and more like Apple is going to deliver a very major upgrade to OS X. It's going to drive MS nuts that they are falling so far behind, especially when it comes to Spotlight. The graphing calculator will add some kick to students and some scientists.

The real issue for me is that Apple continues to move forward with major steps in both software and hardware. All with "only" 2% of the market share.

Amazing what a tiny little company with relatively no cash can accomplish compared to the behemoth with near-limitless resources in cash and human knowledge.

I keep hearing, from what I believe are ignorant people, that software developers working for Microsoft are geniuses and innovators...but I think we know who the real brains are working for.
post #9 of 32
AddressBook sharing. Done.

Now waiting for Rendezvous...err...Open Talk...iCal calendar sharing.



Tiger looking more fun all the time.
post #10 of 32
I don't know how I missed it but the memory swap encryption is excellent news. Some people have been complaining lately that some passwords could be found in the swap files.

This should take care of the problem.
post #11 of 32
Quote:
Originally posted by kim kap sol
I don't know how I missed it but the memory swap encryption is excellent news. Some people have been complaining lately that some passwords could be found in the swap files.

This should take care of the problem.

But at what price? There has to be some performance impact here.
post #12 of 32
addressbook sharing is a huge feature for me and my wife with multiple computers in our home. Having one database of addresses that we can use will be a huge help. I understand that we could do this through .mac, but that is a long process.

Now if iCal can incorporate the ability for invites to meetings and even some M$ Exchange support we could all be in business, plus it would further the push of making the mac a viable choice in the corporate environment.

my 2 cents
zen
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Imagine all the people!!!
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post #13 of 32
Quote:
Originally posted by mikef
But at what price? There has to be some performance impact here.

Not necessarily.

Hard drives are unbelievably slow relative to the rest of the computer — literally thousands to tens of thousands of times slower, depending on the part. The filesystem can get some encryption done during the hard drive's seek time, and it can do encrypt the next spoonful of data while the hard drive is busily writing out the last spoonful. All the time required to the work is buried in the time the computer spends waiting for the hard drive, and the user never notices a slowdown at all.
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"...within intervention's distance of the embassy." - CvB

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Becca Sutlive - Iowa Fried Rock 'n Roll - now on iTMS!
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post #14 of 32
Quote:
The filesystem can get some encryption done during the hard drive's seek time, and it can do encrypt the next spoonful of data while the hard drive is busily writing out the last spoonful. All the time required to the work is buried in the time the computer spends waiting for the hard drive, and the user never notices a slowdown at all.

Regardless of your explanation of how it might work, you cannot aruge that additional CPU cycles will be required to perform the encryption. Yes, today's CPUs are fast, however encryption is still an operation that requires CPU cycles.

Whether or not this peformance hit will be noticed by the end-user is another story, hence my asking "at what cost?".
post #15 of 32
Quote:
Originally posted by Eagleeye87
This looks really nice, especially the graphing calculator. Once I saw the pictures of the graphing calculator I knew they were familiar. It looks like Curvus Pro X, a graphing calculator produced by Arizona. After noticing this, I went to the website and discovered an interesting little tidbit. "On July 22, 2004 Curvus Pro X was bought by an international company and its distribution has been discontinued. It is therefore not possible any longer to download nor to buy any kind of registration license for this program." http://www.curvuspro.ch/osx/en/index.html As far as I figure Apple must have bought the rights to the program so that they could include it in Tiger. I am glad to see this as Curvus Pro X was a great graphing application.

Interesting... the folks at PacidifcTech who developed the original graphing calculator shipped with Mac OS have for years said that they didn't plan on developing a Mac OS X native version... that running in Classic mode was good enough. Now suddenly they say they are testing one. Wonder if there is any connection...
post #16 of 32
Quote:
Originally posted by mikef
Regardless of your explanation of how it might work, you cannot aruge that additional CPU cycles will be required to perform the encryption. Yes, today's CPUs are fast, however encryption is still an operation that requires CPU cycles.

Whether or not this peformance hit will be noticed by the end-user is another story, hence my asking "at what cost?".

Its the cost of security. You can't have security at no cost. Some of the cost is having passwords all over and not booting up straight into OS X. Or having to enter a password to update the OS or some apps. Or, in my case, having to unlock my keychain when I wake my iBook from sleep.

In this case, if you felt insecure about VM on your computer, you can encrypt it, at the cost of some speed. But, then again, if this wasn't a concern of yours, you can leave it off.

However, the bigger question should be, "What kind of encryption is it?" Some algorithms would take more time to encrypt/decrypt than others, which other algorithms may not be that secure to prevent people from decoding it (although its one thing to just see if you can find a password, its another to spend time decrypting a swap file hoping to find a password).
post #17 of 32
Quote:
Originally posted by mikef
...however encryption is still an operation that requires CPU cycles.

But if the CPU is otherwise sitting there waiting for the drive to get back with the data, it doesn't cost anything.

You can have passengers in your car asking "Are we there yet? How about now?" or they can help with navigating, calling the hotel to validate the room, finding a restaurant, and making reservations. That work doesn't lengthen the total travel time.
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post #18 of 32
For those with this build, can you explain how the Addressbook sharing works? Is it for sharing between multiple users on the same box, users over Rendezvous, or over the internet? Or perhaps all of the above? I think knowing the answer to this could potentially give us an idea on where they're going with sharing in general. If it has support for multiple users on the same machine, then perhaps other apps like iCal, iTunes, iPhoto, etc may also get that functionality. Which as we all know is really needed.

John
post #19 of 32
Quote:
Originally posted by mikef
Regardless of your explanation of how it might work, you cannot aruge that additional CPU cycles will [not] be required to perform the encryption. Yes, today's CPUs are fast, however encryption is still an operation that requires CPU cycles.

But if those CPU cycles would otherwise be wasted while the system waits for the hard drive, what's the cost? A few milliwatts, nothing more.

Quote:
Whether or not this peformance hit will be noticed by the end-user is another story, hence my asking "at what cost?".

My argument is that there could well be no performance hit whatsoever if the system would otherwise be twiddling its thumbs, waiting for the hard drive.

As another example, the coffeehouse across the street from my office individually brews each cup of coffee. This takes a while. It's a popular place, so you're also standing in line for a while. So, they ask you what you want while you're still pretty far back in line, and bury the time required to brew the coffee under the time required to get to the register. By the time you're paid up, your coffee's done. Even if you ask for a slow brew, it effectively takes no time to get your coffee, because you're otherwise occupied while it's brewing.
"...within intervention's distance of the embassy." - CvB

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The Mayflies - Black earth Americana. Now on iTMS!
Becca Sutlive - Iowa Fried Rock 'n Roll - now on iTMS!
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"...within intervention's distance of the embassy." - CvB

Original music:
The Mayflies - Black earth Americana. Now on iTMS!
Becca Sutlive - Iowa Fried Rock 'n Roll - now on iTMS!
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post #20 of 32
Thank God for real bookmarks in Preview!

I always thought it was a sick joke that Adobe Reader had so-called Bookmarks that were nothing of the sort. They were chapter and header markers.

I used to have the practice of writing a Stickie when I wanted to leave a note of where I stopped reading. Real bookmarks and the ability to annotate will prevent a lot of unnnecessary hassle and make PDF's almost as useful as they could potentially be.
post #21 of 32
Does anyone know anything about the Dynamic DNS in the sharing tab? What services it works with? I'd like to try it out but I didn't attend WWDC and I don't have a build.
post #22 of 32
Quote:
Originally posted by macFanDave
Thank God for real bookmarks in Preview!

I always thought it was a sick joke that Adobe Reader had so-called Bookmarks that were nothing of the sort. They were chapter and header markers.

I used to have the practice of writing a Stickie when I wanted to leave a note of where I stopped reading. Real bookmarks and the ability to annotate will prevent a lot of unnnecessary hassle and make PDF's almost as useful as they could potentially be.

yes yes yes!
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post #23 of 32
Quote:
Originally posted by Amorph
My argument is that there could well be no performance hit whatsoever if the system would otherwise be twiddling its thumbs, waiting for the hard drive.

Multithreaded operating systems and filesystems do not "twiddle their thumbs". Unused CPU cycles are given back to the task scheduler which allocates them to processes waiting to be run.

The fact of the matter remains that with the filesystem encrypting the swap file, there is a new task required that is consuming CPU cycles that previously were made available to other tasks. CPU cycles are finite. As soon as you add a new process, it takes cycles away from other processes.
post #24 of 32
Assuming the CPU is constantly pegged at 100%, then yes, you are correct.

(Checks CPU meter)

Nope, not here. Sorry to hear your machine is that bogged down...
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post #25 of 32
Frankly, I am more excited by Address Book sharing because Apple can take on Plaxo with something truly peer-to-peer and updating without annoying reminder emails. At least i hope so.
post #26 of 32
Quote:
Originally posted by mikef
Multithreaded operating systems and filesystems do not "twiddle their thumbs". Unused CPU cycles are given back to the task scheduler which allocates them to processes waiting to be run.

If there are any. If they aren't also blocked on I/O.

I/O has this funny way of interrupting the normal course of things.

Quote:
The fact of the matter remains that with the filesystem encrypting the swap file, there is a new task required that is consuming CPU cycles that previously were made available to other tasks. CPU cycles are finite. As soon as you add a new process, it takes cycles away from other processes.

Which, as Kickaha points out, only matters in the very worst case, and then only if those processes aren't also blocking on I/O.

It remains obvious that, in all but pathological cases, VM encryption will be free for all intents and purposes. There are already implementations like this out in the wild, and nothing is getting bogged down. Your concern is at best theoretical. Unless Apple seriously drops the ball on the implementation, I don't imagine anyone will even notice the impact.
"...within intervention's distance of the embassy." - CvB

Original music:
The Mayflies - Black earth Americana. Now on iTMS!
Becca Sutlive - Iowa Fried Rock 'n Roll - now on iTMS!
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"...within intervention's distance of the embassy." - CvB

Original music:
The Mayflies - Black earth Americana. Now on iTMS!
Becca Sutlive - Iowa Fried Rock 'n Roll - now on iTMS!
Reply
post #27 of 32
Quote:
Originally posted by mikef
Multithreaded operating systems and filesystems do not "twiddle their thumbs". Unused CPU cycles are given back to the task scheduler which allocates them to processes waiting to be run.

Correction... Multithreaded OSs do not twiddle their thumbs if and only if they have something else to do. Realistically, almost ALL computers twiddle their copper and aluminum thumbs about 95% of the time... Only 90% for power users.

Oh yeah, only 5% for active servers. But the thing is, if you have an active server you care a lot more about security than a few CPU cycles. And, hopefully your server has enough memory that it doesn't have to write to or read from the page file very often.

In other words, the cost of this feature should be really low for just about everyone.
post #28 of 32
Quote:
Originally posted by HumanJHawkins
Correction... Multithreaded OSs do not twiddle their thumbs if and only if they have something else to do. Realistically, almost ALL computers twiddle their copper and aluminum thumbs about 95% of the time... Only 90% for power users.

Whatever - they twiddle 95% of the time if you include time the user is doing other things. If you are rendering scenes in some graphics/video app, its going to be slower with encryption- particularly because you ram is swapped out all the time.

Have no doubt that there is going to be a Mac out there that can just barely capture analog video-in without encryption, and can't keep up with it on.

However, I agree that for most people whom it will affect, they will just get a new machine. Its not going to be a serious issue.

Hey - did I just use "whom" right! If I did its the first time.
post #29 of 32
Quote:
Originally posted by jhitchco
Does anyone know anything about the Dynamic DNS in the sharing tab? What services it works with? I'd like to try it out but I didn't attend WWDC and I don't have a build.

I'm with jhitchco. Tell us more about Dynamic DNS. Maybe someone at Apple saw my post from fifteen months ago where I said:

Quote:
Originally post by fahlman
I request that Apple adds a dynamic DNS application to 10.3, which in conjunction with your .mac account allows you to access your computer from any other MacOS X computer that has an internet connection and an Apple client application. With the growth of broadband connections with dynamic IP address this would not only make .mac a must have, but would also add one more feature to 10.3 that would make people want to upgrade.
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post #30 of 32
Quote:
Originally posted by joshDavenport
Whatever - they twiddle 95% of the time if you include time the user is doing other things. If you are rendering scenes in some graphics/video app, its going to be slower with encryption- particularly because you ram is swapped out all the time.

The hard drive is going to be killing you there, not any encryption algorithm. Remember, a hard drive is three or four orders of magnitude slower to respond than a CPU, minimum. If your system thrashes when you do work, the solution is more RAM. There's no way around that.

Quote:
Have no doubt that there is going to be a Mac out there that can just barely capture analog video-in without encryption, and can't keep up with it on.

Given that every Mac CPU that can run video software at any usable speed can handle far more bandwidth than any external bus has, I sincerely doubt this. Again, sure it's theoretically possible, but in practice it's so pathologically unlikely that there's no point considering it. The hypothetical problems raised by the technology pale to nothingness beside the real benefits of the technology.

At any rate, if some machine exists for which this would be true, the problem would be solved the same way thrashing is solved: More RAM.
"...within intervention's distance of the embassy." - CvB

Original music:
The Mayflies - Black earth Americana. Now on iTMS!
Becca Sutlive - Iowa Fried Rock 'n Roll - now on iTMS!
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"...within intervention's distance of the embassy." - CvB

Original music:
The Mayflies - Black earth Americana. Now on iTMS!
Becca Sutlive - Iowa Fried Rock 'n Roll - now on iTMS!
Reply
post #31 of 32
Quote:
Originally posted by averagezen
addressbook sharing is a huge feature for me and my wife with multiple computers in our home. ...

Hope they are also working on a way to share some Mail filtering rules...
post #32 of 32
Quote:
Originally posted by Amorph
If there are any. If they aren't also blocked on I/O.

I/O has this funny way of interrupting the normal course of things.

Which, as Kickaha points out, only matters in the very worst case, and then only if those processes aren't also blocking on I/O.

It remains obvious that, in all but pathological cases, VM encryption will be free for all intents and purposes.

I have been experimenting with encrypted swap on my Mac for about a month now... I simply disabled the dynamic_pager in /etc/rc startup script and then wrote a little startup items script to create an encrypted Disk Image that holds the swap files.

I use a "sparse image", the same kind that FileVault uses, so that there is no overhead in disk space vs. unencrypted swap. I was only able to get this to work in Tiger (WWDC release so far). On 10.3.x sparse image for swap does not work.

Performance overhead? For me, NOT NOTICEABLE vs unencrypted swap.


Here is an encrypted-swap script by Andreas Schwartz (not me) that seems to work well with 10.3.x -- try it for yourself!
http://andreas-s.net/osx-encrypted-swap.html

AlBook 15" 1.25 GHz, 1.25 GB RAM. When I'm swapping, I'm generally hammering the disk via application-level I/O anyway (Photoshop or Mail.app or compiling or copying large files to Firewire or running a large Java application (Eclipse IDE)).
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