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Inside Mac OS X Tiger build 8A323 - Page 2

post #41 of 70
dose QUICKTIME MPEG4 AVC/H.264 encode/decode work in these builds or is it not present?
I'm having deja-vu and amnesia at the same time. I think I've forgotten this before.
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I'm having deja-vu and amnesia at the same time. I think I've forgotten this before.
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post #42 of 70
Quote:
Originally posted by staphbaby
defaults write com.omnigroup.OmniWeb5 OWUserStyleSheetLocation
file:///Users/your account/Documents/OWCSS.css

sounds like u are suggesting some cryptic method of entering a preference to use a stylesheet in the 'com.omnigroup.OmniWeb5.plist'.

i entered in the terminal

defaults write com.omnigroup.OmniWeb5 OWUserStyleSheetLocation

command not found

a simple UI pref woiuld be nice
post #43 of 70
Quote:
Originally posted by oceanzen
By far the best thing about Tiger for me, will be the fact that it is 64 bit and so should show considerable difference to the speed ( I hope).

First of all, Tiger isnt 64 bit. It is 32 bit, with specific 64 bit optimizations for the G5's.
Secondary, 64 bit isnt gonna give you more than 0-5% more speed.
"There's no bigot like a religious bigot and there's no religion more fanatical than that espoused by Macintosh zealots." ~Martin Veitch, IT Week [31-01-2003]
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"There's no bigot like a religious bigot and there's no religion more fanatical than that espoused by Macintosh zealots." ~Martin Veitch, IT Week [31-01-2003]
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post #44 of 70
Quote:
Originally posted by Targon
sounds like u are suggesting some cryptic method of entering a preference to use a stylesheet in the 'com.omnigroup.OmniWeb5.plist'.

i entered in the terminal

defaults write com.omnigroup.OmniWeb5 OWUserStyleSheetLocation

command not found

a simple UI pref woiuld be nice

Here's an idea... if you don't like OW, you don't like the workarounds people have given you, and you are going to complain at each stage when people are trying to help... don't use it.

defaults is in /usr/bin/defaults - try typing it that way.
My brain is hung like a HORSE!
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My brain is hung like a HORSE!
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post #45 of 70
So if Tiger was purely 64-bit, it would run at least twice as fast as Panther does?
post #46 of 70
*Sigh*

No.

64-bit *ONLY* refers to memory access and bus-wdith. It has jack all to do with computation speed unless you're dealing with massive amounts of data, and then it only has to do with getting data to/from the CPU.

In some cases, it can actually slow down computation by a few percent.
My brain is hung like a HORSE!
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My brain is hung like a HORSE!
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post #47 of 70
Quote:
Originally posted by Kickaha
shibnitz(n): 1. Da bomb. 2. r0x0rs. 3. bitchin'. cf. Spotlight.

Your variant of shiznitz?
post #48 of 70
An new information about this build? Screenshots?
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I'm a Computer Geek. If I'm not here I'm either sleeping or I died.
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post #49 of 70
Quote:
Originally posted by sjk
Your variant of shiznitz?

I am but a trendsetter.

Oh and lookie here: http://arstechnica.com/news.ars/post/20041211-4454.html

Turns out WinFS, the behavioural user-end equivalent of Spotlight, isn't even going to see the light of day by Longhorn *Server*. They're thinking another 4 years out at this point. Wow.

(Note I said behavioural user-end equivalent because while it is radically different under the hood, the goal was to provide the same sort of metadata flexibility to the user that Spotlight will offer - *without* requiring developers to go insane rewriting their back ends, or users to learn a whole new approach at one shot.)
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My brain is hung like a HORSE!
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post #50 of 70
Quote:
Originally posted by Kickaha
(Note I said behavioural user-end equivalent because while it is radically different under the hood, the goal was to provide the same sort of metadata flexibility to the user that Spotlight will offer - *without* requiring developers to go insane rewriting their back ends, or users to learn a whole new approach at one shot.)

Yep, it's been suggested that Spotlight is a first step on Apple's path for future filesystem-related enhancements rather than forcing developers/users to take one long WinFS-type jump. Seeing Spotlight as a beginning rather than the end gives it a fairer comparison with WinFS.
post #51 of 70
Yeah, Apple has learned this lesson well: train the users slowly, with neat new tools in certain apps that they learn to love, and then deploy them across the board after they've been fine-tuned.

Eg, smart playlists, iTunes' search field. iTunes was the proving ground, and it has turned out to be a fantastic UI addition. So much so, that we're about to see it in darned near every app Apple ships. Address Book, Mail, Finder... anything that deals with collections of data (which is most things we do on the computer, in my experience) is about to get a huge upgrade thanks to this little pair of ideas.

The march to a database based filesystem really started with iTunes, if you think about it. Users are now prepped and not only are they not *afraid* of the new UI features, they can't *wait* for them.

That's salesmanship.

Longhorn's approach was going to force users to get comfy with a radically new approach all at one shot. "You're going to use it, and you're going to *like* it!" Ditto for the developers. Getting developers on board with CoreData means that when the inevitable shift occurs under the hood, those devs will be already ready for it. Slick.
My brain is hung like a HORSE!
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My brain is hung like a HORSE!
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post #52 of 70
Quote:
Originally posted by Targon

My criteria again if u missed it, 'a small light app to simply open an excel file'.

Targon, check out the program icExcel.
It just might be what you are looking for.
http://www.panergy-software.com/prod...cel/index.html

I'm not connected with the developer and I haven't actually tried the program myself...
post #53 of 70
Can anyone comment on whether or not Mail.app plays better with Groupwise appointments now? The current version doesn't indicate that calendar items have been moved to the calendar folder and are unread (and so I miss appointments). I'd love to switch back to Mail.app from Entourage, but these "hidden" appointments are a deal-breaker.
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Gangs are not seen as legitimate, because they don't have control over public schools.
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post #54 of 70
Quote:
Originally posted by Eric_Z
Hmmm, does anybody know if smart folders are fully scriptable? So that there'd be a easy way to, say, show the 20 most used aplications that isn't in the dock. As i imagine that the current interface doesn't allow you to do that, or...?

I don't know about that, but I do know that SpotLight is integrated in Automator so you can use its results to create Workflows.

Mike
post #55 of 70
Quote:
Originally posted by Kickaha
The march to a database based filesystem really started with iTunes, if you think about it.

Thanks for the reminder. Forgot I've even used iTunes as a simple example to explain why Spotlight will be cool.

And CoreData will be the shiznitz, too.
post #56 of 70
Quote:
Originally posted by ZO
dose QUICKTIME MPEG4 AVC/H.264 encode/decode work in these builds or is it not present?

Ahhh good question. Anyone? ... Anyone?

Any hint of native HDV support?
- - - - - - - -

- J B 7 2 -
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- - - - - - - -

- J B 7 2 -
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post #57 of 70
Quote:
Originally posted by sjk
And CoreData will be the shiznitz, too.

CoreData rulez. Definitely.
Technology is dominated by two types of people: those who understand what they do not manage, and those who manage what they do not understand. Putts Law
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Technology is dominated by two types of people: those who understand what they do not manage, and those who manage what they do not understand. Putts Law
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post #58 of 70
Quote:
Originally posted by - J B 7 2 -
Ahhh good question. Anyone? ... Anyone?

Any hint of native HDV support?

Removed
post #59 of 70
Quote:
Originally posted by sjk
Thanks for the reminder. Forgot I've even used iTunes as a simple example to explain why Spotlight will be cool.

I find there's one other simple thing which makes Spotlight and iTunes searching so super useful, and that's live searching as you type. You don't have to type something, then wait for results, then reselect the search box, change your search, rinse and repeat, it's so much simpler... In iTunes, half the time I don't even finish typing my search phrase, as after a few letters I see the track I was after anyway.

I wonder if Microsoft will pick up on this - I've not used their new desktop search toolbar, but the demo flash suggests that it isn't the case.

Neil.
a.k.a. Arnel
post #60 of 70
Quote:
Originally posted by MasonMcD
This?

3G

awesome, thanks

if you do any encoding can you give your machine's specs (processor, ram) what source file is and destination, and approx speed?

for example, if you have 1 minute of DV material and convert it to a 512kbs MPEG4 AVC/H.264 file, can you tell me how long it took to do? Is there option for double pass?

The more the info, the better!

Thanks
I'm having deja-vu and amnesia at the same time. I think I've forgotten this before.
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I'm having deja-vu and amnesia at the same time. I think I've forgotten this before.
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post #61 of 70
Quote:
Originally posted by ZO
awesome, thanks

if you do any encoding can you give your machine's specs (processor, ram) what source file is and destination, and approx speed?

for example, if you have 1 minute of DV material and convert it to a 512kbs MPEG4 AVC/H.264 file, can you tell me how long it took to do? Is there option for double pass?

The more the info, the better!

Thanks

Removed
post #62 of 70
Quote:
Originally posted by costique
CoreData rulez. Definitely.

I am confused about a lot of the details on CoreData. Could you go into any details about what advantages it offers?
post #63 of 70
Quote:
Originally posted by MasonMcD
http://www.masonmcd.net/export.png

http://www.masonmcd.net/exportimage.png

http://www.masonmcd.net/properties.png

For those settings (glitchy interface wouldn't let me radio button multipass) set to allow streaming (under the streaming tab), a 7:39 iMovie project took 40 minutes on a 1.5 GHz AlPB 1.2 GB RAM.

It did something funky with the audio, though. The movie is 7:39, and same for the audio track, but it didn't combine them properly, and the audio didn't play at all. The video wasn't deinterlaced or something either, and had these horizontal lines throughout. Previewing the iMovie is pretty much impossible it's so choppy.

Looks like High Def is in there, but still lots to work on, it seems.

Thats awesome wow, thanks. We are looking into MPEG 4 AVC streaming servers that have to convert raw source t o512/1mbit AVC streams. Some source may even be 4-8 mbit mpeg2 transcoding.

Looks like you have aboatload of options!!

You should report to Quicktime team all the problems you have. I know some people there and they are working like mad on AVC in Quicktime and any input is welcome.

Thanks again
I'm having deja-vu and amnesia at the same time. I think I've forgotten this before.
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I'm having deja-vu and amnesia at the same time. I think I've forgotten this before.
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post #64 of 70
Anyone snag the screenshots MasonMcD posted before he removed them? If not, can you describe them?
post #65 of 70
Quote:
Originally posted by MPMoriarty
I am confused about a lot of the details on CoreData. Could you go into any details about what advantages it offers?

Mac OS X v10.4 Tiger: Developer Overview
post #66 of 70
Quote:

Read it before and that didn't give me a lot of information except that it is a framework that helps developers with creating and managing database backends for their applications.

Here's a question though: Can the data that is stored in a application's CoreData database be indexed by SpotLight?
post #67 of 70
Quote:
Originally posted by MPMoriarty
Can the data that is stored in a application's CoreData database be indexed by SpotLight?

Based on information from Working with Spolight I don't see how that would work since Spotlight and its importers are file oriented. What types of Core Data objects would Spotlight index and what would be the results of queries, assuming an importer could be written for it? Maybe you'll locate database files more efficiently with Spotlight but it won't help make any useful interpretation of the content.
post #68 of 70
Quote:
Originally posted by MPMoriarty
Read it before and that didn't give me a lot of information except that it is a framework that helps developers with creating and managing database backends for their applications.

Here's a question though: Can the data that is stored in a application's CoreData database be indexed by SpotLight?

Yes, but from what I can gather I presume you'll have to write a metadata importer for that kind of database.

CoreData is essentially an Apple-provided API for working with databases, be they XML or SQL or anything yet to come. You write one program and it should with a nearly zero effort work with any back-end supported by Apple. SQL support is not too shabby, to start with.
Technology is dominated by two types of people: those who understand what they do not manage, and those who manage what they do not understand. Putts Law
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Technology is dominated by two types of people: those who understand what they do not manage, and those who manage what they do not understand. Putts Law
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post #69 of 70
Quote:
Originally posted by MPMoriarty
Read it before and that didn't give me a lot of information except that it is a framework that helps developers with creating and managing database backends for their applications.

That is what I thought at first.

It looks like the database part of Core Data is the least interesting part. What is cool about Core Data is most likely not going to be visible to end users directly. A developer using Core Data will be able to just describe the data in his application that needs to be saved and let CD take care of the details. In many ways it is very similar to the tradeoff developers made when moving to the original Mac and it's Toolbox.

Before the Mac, everyone wrote their UIs from scratch. The positive side of that was you had the flexibility to do what you wanted as a developer in building a custom UI tailored to your particular application. The negative was that there was a tremendous duplication of effort by developers reinventing / re-implementing all the low level details over and over again.

The winning tradeoff developers made when they moved to the Mac was in sacrificing some freedom to gain a significant amount of functionality for free from Apple. Core Data is the next step in that process of consolidating the common elements of applications into ready to use packages that allow developers to focus their efforts on the unique features of the application.

I've seen people complain about how OS X applications are constantly requiring the latest OS version which forces users to pay for upgrades they don't feel the need for. From a developers perspective things like Core Data, and Bindings in 10.3, enable you to rip out large sections of your code and replace it with something simpler and most likely with more features. Users running older OS versions require the developer to maintain the new small and simple code and all the old messy code. It's just to tempting to just rip out all the old code and require users to have the latest version.
post #70 of 70
Quote:
Originally posted by Tuttle
Users running older OS versions require the developer to maintain the new small and simple code and all the old messy code. It's just too tempting to just rip out all the old code and require users to have the latest version.

Not only tempting. We should not forget that supporting 2 versions of one product based on 2 different APIs/technologies/platforms is likely to be substantially more costly. On the other hand, almost nobody runs 10.0 these days, even though many of us complained about backward compatibility when 10.1 was released. This is progress, and it doesn't care if we like it or not.
Technology is dominated by two types of people: those who understand what they do not manage, and those who manage what they do not understand. Putts Law
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Technology is dominated by two types of people: those who understand what they do not manage, and those who manage what they do not understand. Putts Law
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