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New high-end Xserve to sport faster processors, combo drive

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 
Apple Computer is preparing to refresh its Xserve G5 line of servers, AppleInsider has learned. According to sources, the new models are expected to debut as early as this week.

The new high-end Xserve will feature dual 2.3GHz G5 processors, 1GB of ECC RAM, an 80GB SATA drive, 2x Gigabit Ethernet, a combo drive, and Mac OS X Server with an unlimited license. The unit will reportedly retail for $3999.

A second dual processor 2.3GHz model will include all the features of the high-end Xserve, but will lack an optical drive and include only 512MB of RAM. The server will reportedly retail for $2999 and include a 10-user license.

Apple's new mid-range Xserve will continue to sport dual 2.0GHz G5 processors, 512MB of RAM, an 80GB SATA drive, Gigabit Ethernet, and Mac OS X Server with an 10-user license. The model will reportedly drop $300 in price to $2699.

Catering to corporations who require only a single processor Xserve G5, sources say Apple will introduce a new single processor 2.0GHz configuration with 1GB of RAM, 80GB SATA drive, 2x Gigabit Ethernet, a combo drive, and Mac OS X Server with an unlimited license. This model is expected to retail for $2999.

Finally, sources said that Apple will drop the price of its low-end 2.0GHz single processor Xserve from $2999 to $2699. This unit features 512MB of RAM, an 80GB SATA drive, 2x Gigabit Ethernet, a CD drive, and Mac OS X Server with an unlimited license.

The new Xserve offerings will reportedly be referenced by manufacturers numbers M9745LL/A, M9742LL/A, and M9743LL/A, respectively. Existing configurations being met with price drops are said to be M9215LL/A and M9216LL/A.

Along with the the new Xserves, Apple is expected to debut its highly anticipated Xsan network file system, which was previously slated for launch in the fall of 2004.
post #2 of 15
These specs are terrible.

First, the move to less than unlimited licenses is a big, big mistake. Apple is taking away one of the biggest selling advantages of the XServe, one that costs Apple nothing.

Secondly, the specs are odd, and a price hike is moronic. Just when the XServe is starting to get momentum and Apple has finally starting to get credibility in the corporate work place, and they go and raise prices.

I hope to God these specs and prices are wrong. Otherwise, Apple is letting the iPod success go to their collective heads.

iPod or no iPod, the Mac market share continues to crater, and Apple needs to be much more aggressive than this.
post #3 of 15
The more I think about this, the less I think these specs are correct.

Example:

Take the 2 different D2.3Ghz servers.

If you take the lowered price one, add in the memory, drive, and server upgrade, it's less than the $1000 price difference.

Accordingly, there would be zero reason to buy the high end server when you can get the same spec doing a BTO and save $200-400.

Also, I find it highly dubious that Apple is going to drop the server down to 512MB of memory. This is a server, and anyone wanting a D2.3 machine is going to need more memory for even their most basic of needs.
post #4 of 15
i agree that these specs don't seem right. consider, all current xserves (correct me if i'm wrong) have dual gigE, yet these specs seem to suggest apple is going to take a step backwards to the g4 xserve days and offer models with 1 gigE port. i highly doubt this and i *really* hope it's not true.
post #5 of 15
Quote:
Originally posted by BWhaler
The more I think about this, the less I think these specs are correct.

Example:

Take the 2 different D2.3Ghz servers.

If you take the lowered price one, add in the memory, drive, and server upgrade, it's less than the $1000 price difference.

Accordingly, there would be zero reason to buy the high end server when you can get the same spec doing a BTO and save $200-400.

Also, I find it highly dubious that Apple is going to drop the server down to 512MB of memory. This is a server, and anyone wanting a D2.3 machine is going to need more memory for even their most basic of needs.

you don't take into account the addition of an unlimited client license


the xServe is one product where Apple truly responds to the demands they receive. If they make these changes it's very likely that it's because it's what their clients and market asked for. May not make sense to you and me but each new model seems to serve a slightly different customer.
post #6 of 15
The 10 client machines are probably cluster nodes as they are today and are therfore also missing the two extra drive bays. I've made a list instead:

Dual 2.3GHz G5
1GB ECC RAM
80GB SATA drive
Dual Gigabit Ethernet
Combo drive
Mac OS X Server (Unlimited Client)
$3999.

Single 2.0GHz G5
1GB ECC RAM
80GB SATA drive
Dual Gigabit Ethernet
Combo drive
Mac OS X Server (Unlimited Client)
$2999.

Single 2.0GHz G5
512MB ECC RAM
80GB SATA drive
Dual Gigabit Ethernet
CD ROM drive
Mac OS X Server (Unlimited Client)
$2699 (Today $2999)

Dual 2.3GHz G5
512MB ECC RAM
80GB SATA drive
Dual Gigabit Ethernet
Mac OS X Server (10 Client)
$2999 (sounds like a cluster node)

Dual 2.0GHz G5
512MB ECC RAM
80GB SATA drive
Gigabit Ethernet
Mac OS X Server (10 Client)
$2699. (sounds like a cluster node - today $2999 with dual Gigabit)

Shouldn't there be a single 2.3GHz?
JLL

95% percent of the boat is owned by Microsoft, but the 5% Apple controls happens to be the rudder!
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JLL

95% percent of the boat is owned by Microsoft, but the 5% Apple controls happens to be the rudder!
Reply
post #7 of 15
still doesn't make sense. not just because of the step backwards with the single gigE port, but because there should definitely be a cluster node xserve with the highest ghz possible (2.3ghz in this scenario) as that's the entire point of a cluster node; processing power.
post #8 of 15
Quote:
Originally posted by c9h13o3n
still doesn't make sense. not just because of the step backwards with the single gigE port, but because there should definitely be a cluster node xserve with the highest ghz possible (2.3ghz in this scenario) as that's the entire point of a cluster node; processing power.

The second to last in my list is a 2.3GHz cluster node.

Apple Store Europe is down now btw. - perhaps they are updating the servers now.
JLL

95% percent of the boat is owned by Microsoft, but the 5% Apple controls happens to be the rudder!
Reply
JLL

95% percent of the boat is owned by Microsoft, but the 5% Apple controls happens to be the rudder!
Reply
post #9 of 15
er ya, sorry. im sitting here, barely awake, staring, credit card in hand, waiting to see if xserve updates are announced.
post #10 of 15
Quote:
Originally posted by c9h13o3n
er ya, sorry. im sitting here, barely awake, staring, credit card in hand, waiting to see if xserve updates are announced.

The UK store was back on momentarily and showed "Xserve 2.3GHz" in the "What's new" sidebar

There is also a new category on the left named something like "Essentials for 2005" with "Mac Essentials", "iPod Essentials", "Play!" and one other category.

Unfortunately the store has "closed" up again

Mike
post #11 of 15
They have released three models (as before):

a single 2.0 GHz PowerPC G5 processor with 1GB of PC3200 ECC RAM, a single 80GB Apple Drive Module with expandability for up to 1.2TB, dual Gigabit Ethernet on-board, a Combo (DVD-ROM/CD-RW) drive, FireWireĀ® 800 and USB 2.0, and an unlimited client license of Mac OS X Server for a suggested retail price of $2,999 (US);

dual 2.3 GHz PowerPC G5 processors with 1GB of PC3200 ECC RAM, a single 80GB Apple Drive Module with expandability for up to 1.2TB, dual Gigabit Ethernet on-board, a Combo (DVD-ROM/CD-RW) drive, FireWire 800 and USB 2.0, and an unlimited client license of Mac OS X Server for a suggested retail price of $3,999 (US); and

cluster-optimized dual 2.3 GHz PowerPC G5 processors with 512MB of PC3200 ECC RAM, a single 80GB Apple Drive Module, dual Gigabit Ethernet on-board, FireWire 800 and USB 2.0, and a 10-client license of Mac OS X Server for a suggested retail price that starts at $2,999 (US) per cluster node.
JLL

95% percent of the boat is owned by Microsoft, but the 5% Apple controls happens to be the rudder!
Reply
JLL

95% percent of the boat is owned by Microsoft, but the 5% Apple controls happens to be the rudder!
Reply
post #12 of 15
Quote:
Originally posted by BWhaler
These specs are terrible.

First, the move to less than unlimited licenses is a big, big mistake. Apple is taking away one of the biggest selling advantages of the XServe, one that costs Apple nothing.

Secondly, the specs are odd, and a price hike is moronic. Just when the XServe is starting to get momentum and Apple has finally starting to get credibility in the corporate work place, and they go and raise prices.

I hope to God these specs and prices are wrong. Otherwise, Apple is letting the iPod success go to their collective heads.

iPod or no iPod, the Mac market share continues to crater, and Apple needs to be much more aggressive than this.

The move away from the unlimited is in the cluster model, which doesn't do clients, and, as such, doesn't need an unlimited license.

See, that's the problem with rumors, they're not always correct, and it gets people all in a tizzy until they find out "Oh, wait, yeah, that's OK".

BTW, the 10-client on the mid-range would've been fine, as well, as long as the price was cut by $500 to go along with it. Not all people need a unlimited license.
post #13 of 15
My only concern with this anouncement is the speed of the upgrades. If new chips are ready or almost ready for the G5's at impresive new speeds or using new chips all together, it seems like an ill omen that the Xserve speedup is only up to 2.3. does anyone think the speed/processors of the Xserve is in any way related to what is coming soon from the G5 workstation line???
post #14 of 15
Quote:
Originally posted by mikenap
My only concern with this anouncement is the speed of the upgrades. If new chips are ready or almost ready for the G5's at impresive new speeds or using new chips all together, it seems like an ill omen that the Xserve speedup is only up to 2.3. does anyone think the speed/processors of the Xserve is in any way related to what is coming soon from the G5 workstation line???

Nah, I don't think so. I think the conventional wisdom is that you use things in servers that you know are rock solid and have a very low risk of failure, and speediness is of a lesser import.
A good brain ain't diddly if you don't have the facts
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A good brain ain't diddly if you don't have the facts
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post #15 of 15
cool, thats what I was wanting to believe. I am about to upgrade my office workstations with the latest top of the line PM's, (whatever ships next) so I'm praying for a good update! =).
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