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Items missing in Tiger. - Page 4

post #121 of 172
Quote:
Originally posted by MacCrazy
Cool, I bet 35 passes takes an age! How many over-writes would you need to make it FBI proof!?

If you want to be "fbi proof" forget doing these multi pass wipes, if it is that important, disassemble the HDD, and go over the surface of each platter with the rare earth magnet, then grind the platters to the dust from whence they came....


You can pretty much move the metal arround enough with 8 re writes, but if you have something to hide, get a new drive

if you incist on using the same drive, the only fool proof way is as follows:
one pass all 1's
one pass random data
one pass all 0's
rins and repeat 3x
geeze
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post #122 of 172
Quote:
Originally posted by a_greer
If you want to be "fbi proof" forget doing these multi pass wipes, if it is that important, disassemble the HDD, and go over the surface of each platter with the rare earth magnet, then grind the platters to the dust from whence they came....


You can pretty much move the metal arround enough with 8 re writes, but if you have something to hide, get a new drive


geeze

So the FBI can recover anything! I don't have anything to hide but that's quite impressive data recovery. So i know who to call when I lose my photographs!
post #123 of 172
Quote:
Originally posted by MacCrazy
So the FBI can recover anything! I don't have anything to hide but that's quite impressive data recovery. So i know who to call when I lose my photographs!

not anything per se, they understand the bit patterns and have people that look at the platters with high power microscopes that can reconstruct the data - but it is a known fact that they have a lot more trouble with mac than windows - but the canadian mounties have the apple experts...


Mind you, after 8 wipes, they would have one hell of a time getting at data, so yea it is safe for most people, but it makes me laugh when people say things like "how can I make it do that the fbi cant read my stuff?" when these same people feel perfecly safe with 128bit encrypted banking - as anything over 128 is illegal in the usa - all of this because the feds can now break 128 in about 10 miniuts.
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post #124 of 172
Quote:
Originally posted by a_greer
not anything per se, they understand the bit patterns and have people that look at the platters with high power microscopes that can reconstruct the data - but it is a known fact that they have a lot more trouble with mac than windows - but the canadian mounties have the apple experts...

so smashing the hard drive is the only safe option if you do have something to hide. Well I'm ok the FBI don't have a right to search my computer.
post #125 of 172
atomicchan: that's an interesting idea... you're right in that a three-column view (type, items, preview) would do basically the same as what Spotlight view does now, but I also agree with MacCrazy that it might be confusing for users.

Also, the advantage I see of the Spotlight view is that when requesting a search, and you're not sure what it's going to come up with, you want to be able to see a broad-spectrum view to see at-a-glance what it came up with, then you can narrow down. Remember, this is a view that needs to be focused primarily on content, not on type. The type info is just to help organize it. Note that you can also go by straight list or icon.

Column view is great when your primary focus is narrowing your view to one specific hierarchy path, but you want to see the breadth of possible paths.

Spotlight view is oriented towards a global view on pre-selected items, and the type listings with disclosure triangles are to then reduce the view until you can home in on what you want. Column view would require a user to click on each type in turn to see what had been returned before they could even make a decision on how to proceed.
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post #126 of 172
Quote:
Originally posted by MacCrazy
so smashing the hard drive is the only safe option if you do have something to hide. Well I'm ok the FBI don't have a right to search my computer.

read the second part of the post that I just added above
Quote:
Mind you, after 8 wipes, they would have one hell of a time getting at data, so yea it is safe for most people, but it makes me laugh when people say things like "how can I make it so that the fbi cant read my stuff?" when these same people feel perfecly safe with 128bit encrypted banking - as anything over 128 is illegal in the usa - all of this because the feds can now break 128 in about 10 miniuts.
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post #127 of 172
Quote:
Originally posted by a_greer
read the second part of the post that I just added above

Cool, I was just trying to work out how a criminal could protect themselves. I might keep on the straight and narrow!
post #128 of 172
The neat thing about criminals is that since they are criminals, they can go ahead and use real encryption! Speaking of which, I wonder if I can remember the passphrase to my 4 Mb encryption key. It took forever to do anything with it!

I look forward to the new views presented by Tiger. Since 10.0, I've used column view exclusively. I generally have two windows open, one on the top half of my screen, and one on the bottom, each the full width of the screen. With column view, I can then see much of the hierarchy, a preview and have my sidebar. This set up lets me copy to and from places pretty easily.

But there are bugs with Panther's column view still. I hope these gets fixed in Tiger. Sometimes the scroll bar doesn't show when there is scrollable content, and they haven't fixed the issues or media previews causing weird selection behavior and mislocated previews and after images.

What I see as improvement in Tiger is the ability to do on the fly Éxposé of graphics files as per http://www.apple.com/macosx/theater/spotlight.html. I am hoping that we'll be able to do this on any folder at some point, or even with any type of file! That will blow me away!

Edit: Fixed link. -Kickaha
post #129 of 172
Quote:
Originally posted by Code Master
What I see as improvement in Tiger is the ability to do on the fly Éxposé of graphics files as per http://www.apple.com/macosx/theater/spotlight.html. I am hoping that we'll be able to do this on any folder at some point, or even with any type of file! That will blow me away!

what do you mean? That link doesn't work.
post #130 of 172
(nevermind)

On the fly Expose -- you mean the slideshow feature, yes? Pretty nice.
post #131 of 172
Hey, I have always wondered about encryption. If one was trying to crack the encryption, how would one know if they did or not, unless they know what it is they're looking for? Like suppose you were looking at a hard drive, and there was an image file, if you happened to be missing the one small part at the beginning that says "this is an image", then all the numbers and binary would just look like garbage to you. Same thing with pretty much any file type, except plain text.

*Or what if you don't know how it was encrypted, do you just hope to get lucky?

It seems like if you were trying to anyalize a corrupted harddrive with a microscope it would be very lucky to find those small headers that say what the rest of the info is supposed to be interperated.
post #132 of 172
Quote:
Originally posted by BuonRotto
(nevermind)

On the fly Expose -- you mean the slideshow feature, yes? Pretty nice.

Yeah that is cool.
post #133 of 172
Quote:
Originally posted by a_greer
not anything per se, they understand the bit patterns and have people that look at the platters with high power microscopes that can reconstruct the data - but it is a known fact that they have a lot more trouble with mac than windows - but the canadian mounties have the apple experts...


Mind you, after 8 wipes, they would have one hell of a time getting at data, so yea it is safe for most people, but it makes me laugh when people say things like "how can I make it do that the fbi cant read my stuff?" when these same people feel perfecly safe with 128bit encrypted banking - as anything over 128 is illegal in the usa - all of this because the feds can now break 128 in about 10 miniuts.

So, is File Vault a waste of time with a good password?

Canadian Mounties ... Apple Experts? No kidding? How did that happen I wonder?
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post #134 of 172
Quote:
Originally posted by Code Master
What I see as improvement in Tiger is the ability to do on the fly Éxposé of graphics files as per http://www.apple.com/macosx/theater/spotlight.html. I am hoping that we'll be able to do this on any folder at some point, or even with any type of file! That will blow me away!

You can perform a slideshow on any images you select in the Finder. You can read about it here: http://www.apple.com/macosx/features/finder/
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post #135 of 172
Quote:
Originally posted by ChrisG
You can perform a slideshow on any images you select in the Finder. You can read about it here: http://www.apple.com/macosx/features/finder/

I had noticed that. Windows users have had that feature for a while.
post #136 of 172
Quote:
Originally posted by Imergingenious
That isn't a spotlight search result window though. Spotlight search result windows are in the new platinum metal theme.

Only if activated through the Spotlight menu. Cmd-F gives you the window shown above.
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post #137 of 172
Quote:
As opposed to sleep?

Kickaha, it is like Hibernate on Windows. It was present in certain builds of OS 9 I believe. It saves the RAM contents to the hard drive and the completely shuts down the computer. Sleep in OS X uses a lot of battery. Far more than 9. And even in 9, it still uses battery.

Save and Shut Down is one of the features I'm most looking forward to having added in OS X.
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post #138 of 172
1. The ability to choose between brushed metal and aqua.

2. Sounds with an option between the set in OS9 and a new OSX set

3. A link to the applications folder in the Apple menu and/or dock.
post #139 of 172
Quote:
Originally posted by BenRoethig
3. A link to the applications folder in the Apple menu and/or dock.

You can drag the applications folder to the right of the dock and have that as a link. I have it there, holding it down brings up a menu of what's inside which is handy.
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post #140 of 172
Quote:
Originally posted by danielctull
You can drag the applications folder to the right of the dock and have that as a link. I have it there, holding it down brings up a menu of what's inside which is handy.

Me too. I have tried DragThing and TigerLaunch for launchers and this no-extra-apps solution is actually working a lot better.

I'm still gonna check out Quicksilver, though that is supposed to be much more powerful than a launcher.
post #141 of 172
Quote:
Originally posted by Code Master
The neat thing about criminals is that since they are criminals, they can go ahead and use real encryption! Speaking of which, I wonder if I can remember the passphrase to my 4 Mb encryption key. It took forever to do anything with it!

Yes, but If the FBI can break 128 bit, certinly organized crime groups (particularly rogue dictatorships and terrorist groups) could break into comunicas of those of us who stay legal...I just think that these stupid rules, as much as they help, also hurt, you have to admit, if all confedential comunicas were transmitted with say 512 or higher bit encryption, then they couldnt break into our system without one MASSIVE supercomputer, one that likely couldnt be built without American company involvment - IBM, SYSCO, and maybe even Apple...who would most likly report to the feds if...lets say just for the sake of example N. korea ordered a large scale supercomputer.

but enough with my crazy tin-foil-hat theories...What is missing in tiger? 2048-bit pgp in mail.app out of the box!
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post #142 of 172
Quote:
Originally posted by aplnub
So, is File Vault a waste of time with a good password?

Canadian Mounties ... Apple Experts? No kidding? How did that happen I wonder?

Read it when I was doing some research a few months back - cant find the artical now to save my life...shoulda saved it as a PDF while I had the chance.
You can't quantify how much I don't care -- Bob Kevoian of the Bob and Tom Show.
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post #143 of 172
Quote:
Originally posted by danielctull
You can drag the applications folder to the right of the dock and have that as a link. I have it there, holding it down brings up a menu of what's inside which is handy.

I know you can do it, I've done it too. Apple should do it for you. It'd be much easier on the switchers who don't know enough about the operating system to do it themselves.
post #144 of 172
Quote:
Originally posted by BenRoethig
I know you can do it, I've done it too. Apple should do it for you. It'd be much easier on the switchers who don't know enough about the operating system to do it themselves.

Maybe, they add a URL link, partly to advertise themselves but also to let users know it's customisable. Maybe they should put folders in as well.
post #145 of 172
Quote:
Originally posted by BenRoethig
I know you can do it, I've done it too. Apple should do it for you. It'd be much easier on the switchers who don't know enough about the operating system to do it themselves.

You mean, put the Applications alias there in the Dock at install? Why not, but I am not sure how important that would be for usability.

One thing that I'd like to see for new users' benefit would be an interactive tutorial that floated on top of the UI and gave short explanations of frequent tasks and then instructed the user how to perform them, like dragging a shortcut to the Dock "take this icon (big red circle around the icon) and drag it here (big red X in Dock) to leave a shortcut for later use". This would not bother people during normal use but be a strictly separate "tour" designed to expose the user to Finder, Expose and some suitably non-technical, user-friendly system preferences like changing the desktop background.

Nowadays all games do "in game" tutorials, and many of them live or die by their usability. Why couldn't an OS do the same?

edit: one of these tasks could well be to drag the Apps folder to the Dock, and to use it in a couple different ways. A very natural way to expose people to this new object in the Dock instead of seeing it right away and going "WTF is this supposed to do?".
post #146 of 172
I think Apple would argue that an intuitive OS does not require this.
post #147 of 172
Quote:
Originally posted by MacCrazy
I think Apple would argue that an intuitive OS does not require this.

Only it's not that intuitive. Have you ever had to teach someone to use a computer who literally fears them?

We'll talk about intuitive once people do not have to know what applications are, where in the computer to find them, where in the computer to find their documents, and which application is the right one for the task they are trying to do.
post #148 of 172
They had one is 8.1 and up...
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post #149 of 172
Quote:
Originally posted by Gon
Only it's not that intuitive. Have you ever had to teach someone to use a computer who literally fears them?

We'll talk about intuitive once people do not have to know what applications are, where in the computer to find them, where in the computer to find their documents, and which application is the right one for the task they are trying to do.

Or try converting a windows user who is used to having an application list in the start menu. I've had a couple get really frustrated searching through all the folders trying to access a browser.
post #150 of 172
Quote:
Originally posted by Gon
Only it's not that intuitive. Have you ever had to teach someone to use a computer who literally fears them?

We'll talk about intuitive once people do not have to know what applications are, where in the computer to find them, where in the computer to find their documents, and which application is the right one for the task they are trying to do.

Yeah I agree it would be useful for some people but experienced users would find it frustrating so it shouldn't get in people's way.
post #151 of 172
Quote:
Originally posted by MacCrazy
Yeah I agree it would be useful for some people but experienced users would find it frustrating so it shouldn't get in people's way.

Read my last post again. This is an interactive tutorial that you expressly start.
post #152 of 172
I don't think it would really get in the way that much.
It could just run automatically the first time you start the computer, and it would have an exit button.

Windows sort of has something like this. Actually I don't think I've never done it, but I think it's more of like a flash movie that shows stuff. But anyway, if you don't want to do the tutorial, it's easy to skip.
post #153 of 172
Something like Linspire with it's flash tutorial. It starts when you first install the system after it boots, and if you want, you can follow it, if you don't you can close it.

You can start it at anytime you want, and it covers basic stuff, but in all categories of the OS.
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post #154 of 172
Nothing is missing. Apple needs to make money on 10.5 too.
post #155 of 172
Quote:
Originally posted by Gene Clean
Something like Linspire with it's flash tutorial. It starts when you first install the system after it boots, and if you want, you can follow it, if you don't you can close it.

You can start it at anytime you want, and it covers basic stuff, but in all categories of the OS.

I haven't seen this, but it would be a whole lot more effective if the tutorial was embedded well in the system, so you would not read a passage and watch an animation in a window and then try to imitate it, but would actually do the thing yourself all the time. The relevant items, buttons, icons, objects would be highlighted for you and explanations and animations telling what to do projected right on top of the screen, not in a window.
post #156 of 172
Oh you mean like System 7's Guided Help system?

Macs used to come with a "Welcome to Macintosh" tutorial that auto-ran on first boot. I wish they'd do that again.
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post #157 of 172
This is the demo: http://images.linspire.com/howto/marlin/en_US/kiosk.swf


I don't know if this is what you mean, but if you want, take a look.
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post #158 of 172
Not really like that. I agree with Gon that it needs to be a special type of program that is running on top of everything else, not just a normal application. I am sort of thinking of the Sims, when you do the tutorial game, it lets you play the game and at the same time is showing you how to play. It's like click on the character, and then it points at it with a red arrow, which moves around if the character is moving around.

In Mac OS it should be kind of similar. For example to browse the internet just click here to launch the Safari browser, and it should point to and make the Safari icon blink red in the Doc. Then when the user clicks it, they are actually clicking it, and the program launches. The walkthrough mode should be working with the OS, rather than just showing a movie of what is supposed to happen.
post #159 of 172
Yep WhiteRabbit, that's what I meant.

This method is so effective and prevalent for learning new UI's that nowadays that I'm surprised when I see a game that does not use a live tutorial of some kind.
post #160 of 172
OK, now I see what you guys mean (sorry, kind of slow today). That would indeed be a good idea. Since I don't play any games at all, I'm not really familiar with the method, but it does sound good.
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