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Apple planning Mac-focused TV ad campaign?

post #1 of 30
Thread Starter 
Apples television commercials currently feature only its iPod digital music player, but forthcoming ad spots will likely add a Mac focus, aiding the so-called iPod "halo effect."

These sentiments come from Merrill Lynch analyst, Steve Milunovich, who recently sat down for a one-on-one with Apple Chief Financial Officer, Peter Oppenheimer. However, Milunovich offered no further details.

Following the meeting, the Wall Street analyst said Apple doesnt appear concerned about a cell phone threat to the iPod.

"Management argued that iPod will remain the best way to manage and listen to music with MP3 capability in handsets more complementary than a replacement," Milunovich wrote in a report. "The negatives of music on a handset include a worse user interface and limited battery life."

He quoted Oppenheimer, who doesnt foresee problems working with carriers, implying that negotiating shared economics wouldnt be a deal killer.

Milunovich also stands behind recent video iPod rumors voiced by several analysts, saying he expects wireless and video capability in iPods for the holidays. "Our guess is that iPod will run short video clips, such as Britney Spears gyrating while 'Toxic' plays," he said.

As first reported in an AppleInsider write-up of recent meeting between UBS Investment Research and Apple's exec team, Milunovich also noted that Apple's share of flash-player market surged an additional 15% in March to approximately 60%.

Oppinheimer told Milunovich that Apple remained supply-constrained on the iPod shuffle into March, meaning that analysts will be keeping a close eye on the company's yet-to-be-released April shuffle sales as being another indicator of the new player's potential.

Merrill Lynch reiterates a "Buy" rating on Apple stock with a price objective of $51 per share.
post #2 of 30
Been a while since we got good ads for something other then iPod.
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post #3 of 30
i heard this news elsewhere too. this is good.
post #4 of 30
Quote:
Originally posted by ipodandimac
i heard this news elsewhere too. this is good.

Might the imposible come to be and they actually advertise Moc OS X Specifically?

No probably iMac commercials. They never did run a G5 iMac commercial.
post #5 of 30
I hope they do proper commercials. Not the "Gee Whiz" type they've done before, like the G5 blowing out the side of a house.

A bit more sober perhaps. Actually show what can be done with a Mac?

The Shuffle has shown to be another nay-sayer breaker. In four months it's gone from nothing to 60% of the market.

So much for displays on inexpensive models.
post #6 of 30
Quote:
Originally posted by melgross
I hope they do proper commercials. Not the "Gee Whiz" type they've done before, like the G5 blowing out the side of a house.

A bit more sober perhaps. Actually show what can be done with a Mac?

The Shuffle has shown to be another nay-sayer breaker. In four months it's gone from nothing to 60% of the market.

So much for displays on inexpensive models.

i love it. the Creative Zen Micro people can eat their words.
post #7 of 30
I dont understand the concept, an ad advertising the mac? I dont get it. Will someone explain?
post #8 of 30
Quote:
Originally posted by MajorMatt
I dont understand the concept, an ad advertising the mac? I dont get it. Will someone explain?

I don't understand your not getting it. What do you not understand?

Was that a joke?
post #9 of 30
Quote:
Originally posted by melgross
Was that a joke?

I'll answer for him: yes.

post #10 of 30
Quote:
Originally posted by Davey
I'll answer for him: yes.


Good first post!
post #11 of 30
A commercial in which some features of the Mac OS are demonstrated and we got to see a Mac- perhaps different combinations of features (such as iPhoto in one, iTunes and iPod in another, iMovie another) and Macs (iMac, iBook, etc.), would be great. It would be satisfying to finally see the Mac advertised!
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post #12 of 30
if the forget all the benchmark BS and just showoff the cool things such as expose, multimedia etc.. It will sell.
post #13 of 30
Maybe an arc around a desk. In the shot the people, computer, and software they're using changes continuouly as well as extra crap attached to the computer. If they use the 20 inch iMac and the 20 inch display positioned the same, everything around the screen can change while the screen stays in the same place drawing our focus to it. We'll see all the desktops. Then, at the end it'll change to the portable line while the user/s get up and move to the couch.

Think that'll convey the variety of Apple offerings and capabilities while underscoring the good old "for the rest of us" idea?
post #14 of 30
Quote:
Originally posted by melgross
I hope they do proper commercials. Not the "Gee Whiz" type they've done before, like the G5 blowing out the side of a house.

One of the more interesting reads on advertising I've come across lately discussed VW's apparent move away from the feel-good/fun/"conceptual" ads they were doing for along time to more recent feature/spec-oriented blasé fare. Here's the article.

Quote:
According to Alan Pafenbach, creative director at Arnold Worldwide (Volkswagen's ad agency for the past 10 years), the key here is "product cycle." At the beginning of any product cycle, when the product is first introduced, the ads tend to be emotional showstoppers...

...But a year or two down the roadafter this type of buyer is already driving around in the car and giving it a nickname and affixing "I Love My VW" bumper stickersyou need to start winning over a new type of buyer. People who buy with their heads instead of their hearts. Ads aimed at these folks will tout the car's more practical benefits.

This would seem to me to be as true for computers as cars, and a good approach. Captivate first, infomercial later.
post #15 of 30
Quote:
Originally posted by Guartho
Maybe an arc around a desk. In the shot the people, computer, and software they're using changes continuouly as well as extra crap attached to the computer. If they use the 20 inch iMac and the 20 inch display positioned the same, everything around the screen can change while the screen stays in the same place drawing our focus to it. We'll see all the desktops. Then, at the end it'll change to the portable line while the user/s get up and move to the couch.

Think that'll convey the variety of Apple offerings and capabilities while underscoring the good old "for the rest of us" idea?

Nice
I remember a couple of months ago somewhere on AI someone posted their own TV ad for the Mac mini. Maybe Apple should have a competition for their customers to come up with ads and give cool stuff as prizes - Grand Prize: A top-spec PowerMac with a 30" Cinema Display and a bunch of software
This would show what can be done by anyone with a Mac. Maybe a little ticker running across the bottom of the screen with the details of who made it, what system they used, what software etc.
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post #16 of 30
Isn't there an urban myth that Apple can't advertise OSX otherwise MS wil no longer make Office for the Mac?

Apparently it was something Gates said to Jobs.
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post #17 of 30
Quote:
Originally posted by BuonRotto
One of the more interesting reads on advertising I've come across lately discussed VW's apparent move away from the feel-good/fun/"conceptual" ads they were doing for along time to more recent feature/spec-oriented blasé fare. Here's the article.



This would seem to me to be as true for computers as cars, and a good approach. Captivate first, infomercial later.

They had to change because VW's sales are in the toilet.
post #18 of 30
Quote:
Originally posted by hugodrax
if the forget all the benchmark BS and just showoff the cool things such as expose, multimedia etc.. It will sell.

Benchmarks don't make good commercials, period. I've never understood people who spout off "Apple should advertise with real-world info, like how quickly you can burn a DVD in iMovie or something". Yeah, that will draw them in. "With OS X.4, you can burn a DVD in 4.5 minutes, get 150FPS in Quake III, and run the Cinebench 2003 test suite to a score of 621. Get a Mac people!".

As for showing off 'cool' things. Exactly how is showing off Expose going to sell computers. There's no way to sell it where it doesn't sound like a bad magic show. "Look at Bill. He's got a screen full of windows. Now, when he presses F9, all the windows disappear! Press F9 again, they appear! Now watch. He hits F10, and they all become really small windows!"

And multimedia? Please. All computers do multimedia. You can do movie making, photo cataloging, music playing, on any computer. And its hard to emphasize some supposed advantage over a Windows computer. Hell, if MS put out commercials, you'd all be saying "But my mac does that, why would I want to go to windows?"

Finally, how many commercials from computer companies and MS/Software companies actually give you any idea why their computers are better (hell, most of dell's commercials seem more inclined to tell you they're cheap and tech support in India is always available). Commercials for Windows have always been short on info, long on flying people. And the last set of Office commercials I recall basically involved people tackling each other because they apparently use Office and it makes everyone goofy.

Oh, and VW is the top-selling automaker in China.
post #19 of 30
Quote:
Originally posted by Louzer
Benchmarks don't make good commercials, period. I've never understood people who spout off "Apple should advertise with real-world info, like how quickly you can burn a DVD in iMovie or something". Yeah, that will draw them in. "With OS X.4, you can burn a DVD in 4.5 minutes, get 150FPS in Quake III, and run the Cinebench 2003 test suite to a score of 621. Get a Mac people!".

As for showing off 'cool' things. Exactly how is showing off Expose going to sell computers. There's no way to sell it where it doesn't sound like a bad magic show. "Look at Bill. He's got a screen full of windows. Now, when he presses F9, all the windows disappear! Press F9 again, they appear! Now watch. He hits F10, and they all become really small windows!"

And multimedia? Please. All computers do multimedia. You can do movie making, photo cataloging, music playing, on any computer. And its hard to emphasize some supposed advantage over a Windows computer. Hell, if MS put out commercials, you'd all be saying "But my mac does that, why would I want to go to windows?"

Finally, how many commercials from computer companies and MS/Software companies actually give you any idea why their computers are better (hell, most of dell's commercials seem more inclined to tell you they're cheap and tech support in India is always available). Commercials for Windows have always been short on info, long on flying people. And the last set of Office commercials I recall basically involved people tackling each other because they apparently use Office and it makes everyone goofy.

Oh, and VW is the top-selling automaker in China.

Best selling foreign car.

And wow! What a sophisticated public there!

You do have to show what the computer can do to a certain extent. PC's are all the same so they don't do that. They try to make it cool, like the Dell guy. Or stupid, like Gateways stampeding idiots. Hp has "Invent".

Apple should show how easy things are. Despite what you say, even the reviewers in the PC magazines say that OS X is the best OS, and that iLife the best software package.

Apple should show what comes packaged with the machine. Most PC people I know think that they have to go right out and spend hundreds of bucks to get started. That's one reason they don't switch.

Apple should show them that for most people, all you need is in the box.
post #20 of 30
Quote:
Originally posted by melgross
Apple should show what comes packaged with the machine. Most PC people I know think that they have to go right out and spend hundreds of bucks to get started. That's one reason they don't switch.[/B]

Wow. I thought that was just the PC-centric people I know that thought that
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post #21 of 30
I'm surprised that no one has mentioned the real issue that Apple can push in their ads. Security!

People are scared. Scared of terrorists, scared of the economy going down, scared of the Internet, scared of their computer doing something weird and random.

Apple's take: "Feel safe and secure, buy a mac".

No need to give benchmarks, no need to show expose (all those windows flying around the screen will just scare grandma), just do something stylish that gives people a warm and safe feeling.
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post #22 of 30
Quote:
Originally posted by jms698
I'm surprised that no one has mentioned the real issue that Apple can push in their ads. Security!

People are scared. Scared of terrorists, scared of the economy going down, scared of the Internet, scared of their computer doing something weird and random.

Apple's take: "Feel safe and secure, buy a mac".

No need to give benchmarks, no need to show expose (all those windows flying around the screen will just scare grandma), just do something stylish that gives people a warm and safe feeling.

Yes, because Macs are safe from Terrorists! And in a struggling economy, nothing like owning a Mac! That will keep you safe from a recession! And nothing more friendly then the internet on a Mac. No concerns about going to the wrong site and entering your PayPal password because your account is about to be locked up! On a PC, that's a huge problem. On a Mac, not at all.

Oh, and all you have to do is say "Look at us, we're secure" and the PC commentating crowd will first go "Really, then why are you always releasing security patches?", then the PC crowd will just go out and start up a Mac virus party. It doesn't have to be much. But enough to get people to say "Secure? No viruses? Don't think so!" And the only reason there's no malware/adware for the mac is that there isn't the market for it (who wants to spend the money when the PC has such a huge share?), not because the Mac is somehow secure.

And what does it matter, as the scariest part of computer security isn't what's going on my computer, its what's going on the computers of all those etailers, data warehouses, credit bureaus, etc, that's of more concern. When people can get a couple hundred thousand names, SSNs, etc out of ChoicePoint (through a social engineering problem, BTW, not through some back-door hole), then who cares if anyone can see my email to gramma?

And since most security problems are social engineering issues, not 'firewall settings' or 'closed ports', its really immaterial anyway.
post #23 of 30
Aside from the current iPod TV spots, Apple really has two different marketing problems.

1) Apple does not know how to market to "red" states, "flyover country", "Middle America", or whatever you want to call it. When I see Apple sponsoring a Nextel Cup team, and showing off how their kicka$$ Xserver cluster gives that team an advantage, I'll know they're on the the right track to solve this one.

2) Apple hasn't derailed the family computer know-it-all factor. We've got one in every family; they "just know Macs suck."

I haven't any good ideas on how to solve that one.
post #24 of 30
Quote:
Originally posted by Bart Smastard
Wow. I thought that was just the PC-centric people I know that thought that

I don't understand what you are saying. Please explain.
post #25 of 30
Quote:
Originally posted by jms698
I'm surprised that no one has mentioned the real issue that Apple can push in their ads. Security!

People are scared. Scared of terrorists, scared of the economy going down, scared of the Internet, scared of their computer doing something weird and random.

Apple's take: "Feel safe and secure, buy a mac".

No need to give benchmarks, no need to show expose (all those windows flying around the screen will just scare grandma), just do something stylish that gives people a warm and safe feeling.

I'm not sure that Apple wants to base a campain around that. Why challange these people by stating that "we're so secure"?

It might sell computers, but it might result in attacks.
post #26 of 30
Quote:
Originally posted by melgross
I'm not sure that Apple wants to base a campain around that. Why challange these people by stating that "we're so secure"?

It might sell computers, but it might result in attacks.

Huh???

Do you honestly believe that? That OS X is sitting precariously one step away from Microsoft scale security disasters ?

I am starting to realize just how effective MS's PR campaign has been over the past year or so in dealing with the topic of computer security. They have managed to set the terms of debate to such a degree that there is no place on the Net that doesn't accept as a fact that security is inversely related to popularity.
post #27 of 30
Quote:
Originally posted by Tuttle
Huh???

Do you honestly believe that? That OS X is sitting precariously one step away from Microsoft scale security disasters ?

I am starting to realize just how effective MS's PR campaign has been over the past year or so in dealing with the topic of computer security. They have managed to set the terms of debate to such a degree that there is no place on the Net that doesn't accept as a fact that security is inversely related to popularity.

No! No! No!

Wake up! NO OS IS COMPLETELY SECURE!!!

If you believe that it is, you're in a fantasy world.

All UNIX's are more secure (to a certain extent) than Windows is. The BSD's are more secure than other UNIX's are. Free BSD is more secure than most BSD's are. And Apple has generally done a good job of closing holes, and keeping unnecessary holes turned off.

Are you happy now?

But.

They just came out with a new security fix:

http://www.eweek.com/article2/0,1759,1811817,00.asp

They are ALWAYS coming out with new security fixes.

You really should come out of the borrow once in a while and look around. Most holes are hard to exploit. But there are those that are not as hard. It's tough to get a wide spreading virus running on OS X, but not impossible.

The same thing with trojan horses and spyware..

It's tough, but not impossible.

But if Apple boasts about how there haven't been ANY significant problems, they will challenge those out there to work on it, even if they think that it's harder than they want.

When it comes to the Russian Mafia, or other criminal groups who are out there these days, then yes obscurity does work for Apple. These people are in it for the money, and would rather concentrate on MS as that's where the money is.

But the amateurs who do it for fame and kicks will be inspired. We don't want or need that.

The point here is that even one major successful virus or trojan horse will be hurtful politically.

People looking to switching over because of the word of mouth about Apple's security can't distinguish between one virus and many virus's.

Once it happens, they'll be wary, and think that there's no difference.

Think about this. Don't just jump and think that we're all naively thinking that X is equal to Windows because we see a bit more deeply than you seem to want to look.
post #28 of 30
Quote:
Originally posted by Sam Damon
Aside from the current iPod TV spots, Apple really has two different marketing problems.

2) Apple hasn't derailed the family computer know-it-all factor. We've got one in every family; they "just know Macs suck."

I haven't any good ideas on how to solve that one.

This is so true. my wife's family had this brother in law jerk who pretended he knew computers. He was unemployed and surfed porn all day. That was is expertise. But he was the guy they asked about computers. of course bashed Macs.

His image could be a potential comercial.

A scene with this guy telling the family what to buy (a PC), then installing for them, (this is of course complicated...) then cleaning maleware etc... The point is they are always calling him. he is also a little slimy looking and anoying.

Then cut to a different family that we see buying a Mac, and just truning it on wolla it works. Then the phone rings at its their anoying computer expert relative. They just mention everything is all set up and he shoudl please not come over.

End with a funny tag line about how a mac can keep away relatives or something.
post #29 of 30
Quote:
Originally posted by melgross
I don't understand what you are saying. Please explain.

My apologies melgross, I was trying to be humorous but it obviously fell flat.

My intention was to make comment on your remark about the common misconception that switching to Apple means having to buy all new software.
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post #30 of 30
Quote:
Originally posted by Bart Smastard
My apologies melgross, I was trying to be humorous but it obviously fell flat.

My intention was to make comment on your remark about the common misconception that switching to Apple means having to buy all new software.

Noted. It is a common misconception.
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