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post #41 of 82
this bike doesnt look to bad, and ive been searching for a new bike also, and i didnt think this was half bad....

http://www.diamondback.com/items.asp...=14&itemid=132
Lone Wolf
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post #42 of 82
Quote:
Originally posted by ragingloogie
this bike doesnt look to bad, and ive been searching for a new bike also, and i didnt think this was half bad....

http://www.diamondback.com/items.asp...=14&itemid=132

I'll get laughed off the forum, but having owned a diamondback some 13 years ago, I will always have a place for them. I guess it depends on the price. Just don't expect much respect in the real world when you turn up on it.
post #43 of 82
Mark,
I'm glad you noticed my beloved saddle everyone at my shop has asked, insisted and threatend me to get a new one.. WHY!
its so comfortable..

anyway.. thanks for noticing, and I can see how some would have issue with a kona but that goes for any bike, each company builds their frames with a different style and body type in mind..

I guess we should say, try lots out. go to a shop that will fit the test rig right for you and go for a good spin, and make sure there is a hard climb and a steep down hill involved..

flick.
post #44 of 82
Quote:
Originally posted by MarcUK
I'll get laughed off the forum, but having owned a diamondback some 13 years ago, I will always have a place for them. I guess it depends on the price. Just don't expect much respect in the real world when you turn up on it.

Mark if you ride it I respect ya.
Kids that diss you for riding a certain type of bike had better be pretty damn good them selves.

I had a friend Jeff, raced with me never placed below third. He rode a rigid Rocky Fusion with Huge fat rigid forks on it.. you wouldn't think he was the guy that was about to beat you.

flick.
post #45 of 82
Flick,

I've been looking round for some large chainrings for my imaginary bike.

I was thinking of like 54, 42, 30,

but I can't find any manufacturer who makes rings in such sizes for standard mtb chainsets.

what would you say to putting a roadie triple set on a mountainbike?
post #46 of 82
Quote:
Originally posted by Flick Justice
Mark if you ride it I respect ya.
Kids that diss you for riding a certain type of bike had better be pretty damn good them selves.

I had a friend Jeff, raced with me never placed below third. He rode a rigid Rocky Fusion with Huge fat rigid forks on it.. you wouldn't think he was the guy that was about to beat you.

flick.

I tell ya, once I had a bike nicked, and for a while I rode the cheapest nastiest bike you could lay your hands on.

The thing was lead piping I tell you, and it weighed like 100lbs. At 6am in the morning I was malletting the chainset back on the bike because it wouldn't stay put - We rode off about 35 miles in the blistering heat of summer '93 i think to a Boscombe down airshow, there were my mates of their half-decent bikes. We spent all day in the sun getting roasted. 20 miles into the return journey, they all died! just at the point I was warming up. My mate Dave was like Lance Armstrong, - he had to get off and walk up the last hill, I did it in top gear.

Never forget that, nor will they. My greatest moment. They're all cool though, no pisstaking over the bike - which was just as well I guess.
post #47 of 82
Quote:
I can tell straight from the photos, who's a biker and who's not, obviously Flicks a hardcore biker, you can tell by the relationship of his saddle height to his handlebar height if nothing else he told you gave it away.

Sorry mark, all the "real" bikers now have low seats not high seats.

Haven't you heard? Cross-country is lame and it's now all about the freeride...
Only cross-country weenies keep their seats high.

I'll be keeping my seat low for most of my riding. (see below)

post #48 of 82
Quote:
Originally posted by MarcUK
I'll get laughed off the forum, but having owned a diamondback some 13 years ago, I will always have a place for them. I guess it depends on the price. Just don't expect much respect in the real world when you turn up on it.

thats prolly the cheapest ill go w/ a bike.. but when i go out to buy my new bike, b/c haro sucks, i had to keep fixing it b/c the guy i bought it from moved his bussiness down to florida, and ive been having to fix it myself, b/c the other guy i brought it too who was recommended by a good buddy of mine, couldnt fix squat.. so i brought it home, fixed it up and now the gears are screwed up and the brake lines wore down... how they wore down is beyond me...

so i figured it was time to go find a new bike, and i figured i go w/ diamondback w/ a price range of about 500-600$, i figure i can get a good mountain bike for that much. and besides, my brother has a diamond back, and he loves it.. so i figured i'd go that route...
Lone Wolf
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post #49 of 82
Quote:
Originally posted by dfiler
Sorry mark, all the "real" bikers now have low seats not high seats.

Haven't you heard? Cross-country is lame and it's now all about the freeride...
Only cross-country weenies keep their seats high.

I'll be keeping my seat low for most of my riding. (see below)


I real appreciate the skill freeriders have, and I have to admit I have bee riding more "northshore" But I'm going to put an end to "real" rider talk right now..
(I know your just poking fun but..)

"real" riders are folks that ride their bikes regardless of the brand style or location. A "real" rider welcomes anyone to join them on a spin. It isn't about how you ride or what you ride but how much you love riding.

maybe I'm a hippie old school cyclist but I've noticed that the once kind community has been tainted but the Bad ass attitude of people that feel that your no good if you don't huck or drop. Respect each other cause there are things you can learn from anyrider you meet regardless of what they ride or how they ride it.

flick.
post #50 of 82
Quote:
Originally posted by MarcUK
Flick,

I've been looking round for some large chainrings for my imaginary bike.

I was thinking of like 54, 42, 30,

but I can't find any manufacturer who makes rings in such sizes for standard mtb chainsets.

what would you say to putting a roadie triple set on a mountainbike?

Well you could but you also have to take into consideration that your ground clearance will be greatly reduced and depending on the riding you are doing it may not be a good idea....also you are going to have to chance your front der. to a road one to accomodate the huge ginormous rings. why you would want to do this is beyond me. but then again some old skool down hill racers who rode rigid xc bikes down fireroads would slap rings that big on their bikes but they didn't have any obstacles. Todays DH's usually don't go any bigger than 48....48 ring in the front with an 11 in the back is a hard gear(way harder than my 53 - 16 on my track bike)...and you can get a MB crankset with a 48.

flick.
post #51 of 82
nice going there flick, nice way to put it when i ride, ive been riding alone, mostly b/c i havnt found anyone else who wanted to ride if they were riding... part of mountain biking though that i like is when you make your own path becasue the path you were just on, ended or there was no path to begin w/... thats what i like about it
Lone Wolf
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post #52 of 82
Quote:
Originally posted by dfiler
Sorry mark, all the "real" bikers now have low seats not high seats.

Haven't you heard? Cross-country is lame and it's now all about the freeride...
Only cross-country weenies keep their seats high.

I'll be keeping my seat low for most of my riding. (see below)


Yeh right when I was a lad, I'd have done your wee obstacle course pushing 30mph, with no suspension, saddle high, no helmet or body armour, with my chopped down flat bars sporting XT thumbshifters, with that look on my face saying damn, I could've done this at 40mph.

Yee bikers of today are lame sissies, scared to get wet or muddy, cry when chainsuck scrapes a mm2 off your alu chainstays.

Even Shimano knows you're girls, because thats why they've shrunk the rings to 42 teeth and had to put huge dials on their shifters to let you know you're still in the granny ring going downhill.
post #53 of 82
Quote:
Originally posted by MarcUK
Yeh right when I was a lad, I'd have done your wee obstacle course pushing 30mph, with no suspension, saddle high, no helmet or body armour, with my chopped down flat bars sporting XT thumbshifters, with that look on my face saying damn, I could've done this at 40mph.

Yee bikers of today are lame sissies, scared to get wet or muddy, cry when chainsuck scrapes a mm2 off your alu chainstays.

Even Shimano knows you're girls, because thats why they've shrunk the rings to 42 teeth and had to put huge dials on their shifters to let you know you're still in the granny ring going downhill.

Ok thats funny!

flick.
post #54 of 82
Heheh, no worries, I was only joking with the "real" riders comment. I also ride a lot of cross-country... twas just rebutting the concept of a low seat meaning novice rider. I ride with a number of different groups and it's funny to see how blind each is to other forms of riding.

Here's one of my other rigs (2000 bullit)... picture me bringing this on an epic cross-country ride.

post #55 of 82
OK, maybe you guys can help me out.....

Had a friend with a bike shop who used to build me the odd hybrid thing for getting around town, recreational riding, take with on camping trips for light (improved) trail stuff... mostly just basic transportation with the occasional adventure.

But he's out of the biz and my last rig got stole.

So come to find out I know jack about bikes, and when I go shopping I'm horrified by the marketing differentiation that that happened since I last had to care, obliging me to choose, as they do, from among hybrid, city, comfort, touring, racing, freewheeling, mountain, cruiser, urban, cross over, and god knows what else.

So for a semi-fit semi-old guy who likes to get out in the fresh air, likes to tour the Napa valley and costal areas, likes to get from here to there with a modicum of speed and control, a dash of comfort and heaping helping of reliability, what would ya'll recommend?

Some shops seem to think for anything other than newly paved city streets I should be starting with a MBK and mod for comfort/speed.

Others think I'd be better off starting with a touring set up with an eye towards ruggednesss

Ideas?
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post #56 of 82
yikes, that's a beastie isnt it?
post #57 of 82
Quote:
Originally posted by Flick Justice
Well you could but you also have to take into consideration that your ground clearance will be greatly reduced and depending on the riding you are doing it may not be a good idea....also you are going to have to chance your front der. to a road one to accomodate the huge ginormous rings. why you would want to do this is beyond me. but then again some old skool down hill racers who rode rigid xc bikes down fireroads would slap rings that big on their bikes but they didn't have any obstacles. Todays DH's usually don't go any bigger than 48....48 ring in the front with an 11 in the back is a hard gear(way harder than my 53 - 16 on my track bike)...and you can get a MB crankset with a 48.

flick.

well, a 54:11, gives neary 5:1, so I guess I'll get hella fast , i always used to run out of gearing when it was 48:12, and boy could I pedal fast. There aint nothing like going so fast offroad that you don't have time to make decisions, and have to use the 'force'
post #58 of 82
post #59 of 82
My bike? It's over th..., uh, it's in there somewhere...
post #60 of 82
dfiler,
Santa Cruz sure knows downhill. Really nice ride.. or should I say shopping cart..
addabox,
Are you talking about just sticking to the road to spin miles? I think for comfort and reliability I'd find a Touring bike. I don't know much about them but they seem to have everythign you need. Unless you want to hit the dirt from time to time.. some one else perhaps from norway would know more about touring.

Cake,
at first glance I'm like 'cakes live in china somewhere look at all those bikes!'
where is that?
flick.
post #61 of 82
Quote:
Originally posted by alliancep.s.i

Is that you?
Have you ever been to Calgary Alberta, Canada?
We have a new park called millenium park.
Virtual tour (quicktime VR)

its open 24/7 as they have huge lights and very often you'll find a DJ spining records at night just for fun as you skate or ride..
flick.
post #62 of 82
Quote:
Originally posted by Flick Justice
Cake,
at first glance I'm like 'cakes live in china somewhere look at all those bikes!'
where is that?
flick.

A film studio where I work.
The lot is fairly large so many people ride bikes to get to and fro.

On the weekends there is usually twice as many bikes there and it sometimes is a challenge just to find your bike - then you have to try and extract it from the mass of other bikes.

Kind of a pain, but it beats walkin'.
post #63 of 82
Quote:
Originally posted by addabox
OK, maybe you guys can help me out.....


I'd start with a MBK, get some higher gearing (see above) and get some slick/semi slick tyres.

2nd choice, I'd get one of those hybrid bikes that look like an MBK, the ones with 700c wheels.
post #64 of 82
Oh yeah Flick, I nearly forgot to tell you about my crazy idea.

I was thinking of mating one of those Shimano Nexus 7 speed internal gearing things to a 9 speed cluster.

Imagine the gearing on that

Do you think its possible? I have a welding torch available.
post #65 of 82
Quote:
Originally posted by Flick Justice
Is that you?
Have you ever been to Calgary Alberta, Canada?
We have a new park called millenium park.
Virtual tour (quicktime VR)

its open 24/7 as they have huge lights and very often you'll find a DJ spining records at night just for fun as you skate or ride..
flick.

yes its me, i havent ever been to canada but hopefully in the next few years ill be able to get up there
post #66 of 82
Quote:
Originally posted by MarcUK
Oh yeah Flick, I nearly forgot to tell you about my crazy idea.

I was thinking of mating one of those Shimano Nexus 7 speed internal gearing things to a 9 speed cluster.

Imagine the gearing on that

Do you think its possible? I have a welding torch available.

Dear Frankenbike..
you know if you manage it.. PLEASE take a photo.
I'm not sure the world is ready for such a bike..
flick.
post #67 of 82
I wish I had pics of my Yeti ARC, but I've recently taken up biking again and somehow in the last 3 months I've thrashed it pretty badly. It's almost painful to look at it now.

As for seat positioning. I keep mine almost parallel in height with my bars, but that's a byproduct of me not having the longest legs. I also have knuckle-dragging length arms so my preference in bike geometry steered me toward Yeti's long top tubes and chainstays. I'm sort of sad for my bike...I doubt I'll ever get another Yeti...it's not the same company...in fact it's been several different companies since I got mine in 1996.

I only once weighed my bike way back when, but it was 22.5 pounds with '97 Shimano XTR components...most of which have long since broken and been replaced by a smattering of Syncros and RaceFace crap. Bike weight is crap anyway, isn't it? Other than the weight of the wheels themselves, shouldn't we be more worried about our own weight, heh.
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post #68 of 82
2004 Trek 1500



Andrew
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post #69 of 82
Just bought a commuter bike. It's unique in that it's shaft drive not chain drive. So far I'm loving it.

Made by Dynamic Bicycles
Model: Runabout 7 Speed

post #70 of 82
Quote:
Originally posted by MarcUK
Oh yeah Flick, I nearly forgot to tell you about my crazy idea.

I was thinking of mating one of those Shimano Nexus 7 speed internal gearing things to a 9 speed cluster.

Imagine the gearing on that

Do you think its possible? I have a welding torch available.

Was just scanning more of the other posts after I posted. I have the Shimano Nexus gear box on my bike (see my post above). It's a pretty cool gear box.
post #71 of 82
post #72 of 82
Quote:
Originally posted by Jared

I'm sorry but I just can't allow this to be here..

flick.
post #73 of 82
post #74 of 82
"In a republic, voters may vote for the leaders they want, but they get the leaders they deserve."
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"In a republic, voters may vote for the leaders they want, but they get the leaders they deserve."
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post #75 of 82
Quote:
Originally posted by studio@ilt.ca
Just bought a commuter bike. It's unique in that it's shaft drive not chain drive. So far I'm loving it.

Made by Dynamic Bicycles
Model: Runabout 7 Speed

I was thinking about getting one of those, but my friends convinced me to get my first road bike:


Just got back from doing 40 miles along Hermosa, Venice and Malibu beaches.
Very fun.
post #76 of 82
Quote:
Originally posted by Cake
I was thinking about getting one of those, but my friends convinced me to get my first road bike:


Just got back from doing 40 miles along Hermosa, Venice and Malibu beaches.
Very fun.

What type of brake hoods do you have?
post #77 of 82
Just got back from riding 4 hours of horrible, washed-out, rocky trails in PA. And I saw a huge black bear.
post #78 of 82
Quote:
Originally posted by ThinkingDifferent
What type of brake hoods do you have?

Shimano components all around.
Shimano Ultegra 6600 10 spd. rear
Shimano Ultegra 6600 dbl.front
Shimano Ultegra 6600 brakes:
post #79 of 82
Quote:
Originally posted by ShawnJ
Just got back from riding 4 hours of horrible, washed-out, rocky trails in PA. And I saw a huge black bear.

Crappy ride. Crappy trail. But I thought this flat watery section looked really scenic.



Nice example of carrying a bike like a girl:



Nice shot, but the climb to get to Lake Scranton was probably not worth it.

post #80 of 82
Bumped for my hours-ago purchased Specialized Hardrock:



The frame geometry of this bike is exactly what I was looking for, almost a hybrid between BMX and mountain.
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