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Who here is a runner?

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 
I'm curious if I'm the only one. . . I've noticed that there are some bikers round these parts, but running is cheaper. It's pretty common to see people out jogging (with iPods), but I've always been a no-iPod guy (a no-walkman guy before that), and I find it pleasant to watch people out and about after the workday is thoroughly over. (Hence I like to run in residential neighborhoods around 7:30-8-30PM)

Anyway, it's getting brutal down here. I'm training a little bit harder than usual to run in some races this fall. It has been a while since I've been competitive. I sweat through a synthethic shirt on my 10k, and I'm not a sweaty guy. Oh well. It's time to drink a gallon of water. . . and then some beer.
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post #2 of 14
I ran during high school and for a few years after that in college. Unfortunately, I developed shin splints, so I really can't run much. Nevertheless, I do like running and would like to take it up again.
post #3 of 14
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally posted by tonton
Unfortunately, I developed shin splints, so I really can't run much. Nevertheless, I do like running and would like to take it up again.

I used to get them until I got good, custom insoles for my trainers. As it is, I have flat feet. I'm undergoing a year-long excercise that supposedly allows one to self-correct flat feet (crazy, huh), but I just started a month ago, and, alas, they are still flat.
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post #4 of 14
40 miles a week here...endorphins are addictive!

btw... be very wary of buying training shoes that are 'on special offer' or 'last year's models'....its a false economy. The chances are, they have been on the shelf for months..or longer...The shock absorbent 'sorbothane' (and similar materials) that the soles are manufactured from, deteriorates over time, even when not used. Many people injure themselves as a result of running with trainers with less than adequate shock absorbency properties...resulting in typical runners' injuries like ankle strain, knee problems, shin splints, plantar fasciitis, pulled ligaments etc. etc. And of course, the same goes for old, over used trainers. A new pair of training shoes is good for about 600 miles...depending on how heavy the runner is, etc.
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"We've never made the case, or argued the case that somehow Osama bin Laden was directly involved in 9/11. That evidence has never been forthcoming". VP Cheney, 3/29/2006. Interview by Tony Snow
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post #5 of 14
I used to run 40 miles a week about 12 years ago. I quit for a long time, got fat, and now I'm running again. I did a lot of running this past spring, and got up to about 20 miles a week rather quickly considering. Now it's getting to humid and hot to do a lot of that. I'm going to try to run on the weekends in the morning this summer, but it's back indoors for the mostpart. Funny thing was, I lost a fair amount of weight this winter when I couldn't run but did a lot of weights and hamsper wheels -- you know, stationary bike, treadmill, elliptical, stairclimber. My weight plateaued when running, and now that I'm going indoors again for most of my exercise, I'm starting to lose again.

I just replaced my Asics with a pair of Pearl Izumis just for kicks, and they're pretty nice. I went through a period of chronic shin splints this past fall, and I found that my old shoes just fell apart in the midsole. As soon as I replaced them, things got a lot better. If you're getting shin splints, you might want to look into how you're running, whether you overpronate (do your feet flare out when you push off?) and how much. Get a shoe that is as light as possible while proving enough structure in the medial post to make you run with a more neutral gait. Getting a shoe with a ton of support also means you're getting a heavier shoe. More isn't better. I found that I could get a lighter shoe since I have a neutral gait, which reduced fatigue, which meant that my motion and strikedown were better, which translated into no more shin splints. That, and fresh shock absorption.
post #6 of 14
Been running since high school. It has been my sanity... through undergrad, law school and beyond. It is kind of my own time, my own little world. I do run with my "shuffle," cause I like noise, but I often find myself leaving the music behind so I can just listen to the outside. When you spend as much time inside as I do, you quickly forget how nice it is to just be outside.

I'm running the Marine Corp. in October, so I've got my work cut out for me. I've got a couple races before then, the Crim in August (the day before my birthday) and some other 10K and a 1/2 marathon.

My long run is up to 20 miles....
post #7 of 14
I run only when being hunted

If I've ever ran more than 2km in one go I think that'd be a record
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post #8 of 14
35-40 miles a week here... battling a bit of IT band syndrome right now though... stretching and ice.. my two best friends.
post #9 of 14
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally posted by OBJRA10
I'm running the Marine Corp. in October, so I've got my work cut out for me. I've got a couple races before then, the Crim in August (the day before my birthday) and some other 10K and a 1/2 marathon.

My long run is up to 20 miles....

Cool. I'm no marathoner. I tried a half marathon once, but I prefer 10k or less. (pretty much 8k or 5k). I shooting right now to run a sub-15 minute 5k. I've actually made that time on a practice run 3 weeks ago, but it seems that my pace isn't too consistent. I do know that it has a lot to do with what I eat before running, but the problem is that I can't eat for 5-6 hrs before running. If I do, my stomach gets very painful. I've found the best thing to eat (so far) is a fatty hamburger 6hrs before running, half a no-doze 2hrs before, and two shots of corn syrup 1hr before.
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post #10 of 14
5k addict here. I love the t-shirts.

I had to stop during the winter. Now I have a treadmill with shock absorbers, esay on my knee (two surgeries), and I may have to find some treadmill 5k's to start running in, this heat sucks!
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post #11 of 14
Quote:
Originally posted by sammi jo
btw... be very wary of buying training shoes that are 'on special offer' or 'last year's models'

RDF much? I find that very hard to believe...

As far as running goes, why run when you can walk? I'd rather walk 18 holes of golf than run a mile.
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post #12 of 14
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally posted by DanMacMan
RDF much? I find that very hard to believe...

As far as running goes, why run when you can walk? I'd rather walk 18 holes of golf than run a mile.

18 holes of golf takes 3 hours. If you're good. In contrast, A 5 mile practice run takes 30-35 minutes. I enjoy golf too, but I'm at the office for most of the day, and I can run in the dark. In fact, I like running in the dark.

In all fairness, I'd rather play football/soccer (same sport, different names) but I like exercise every day, and there's not always a game. Plus, the training allows me to pressure defenders for the full 90 minutes. I's estimate that I run more than four miles during a game. (perhaps closer to seven. . . hard to say)

Aside from that, it takes a few months of running before it stops being painful. You have to develop better circulation in your legs, which doesn't happen overnight. People I know with large upper or lower bodies also seem to hate running. Of course, with that said there are some phenomenal distance runners who are short and stocky.
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post #13 of 14
i run cross country and track in school, and i clock in maybe 20 miles a week on my own, give or take.
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I think I think...therefore, I think I am.

We get to think of life as an inexhaustible well. Yet everything happens only a certain number of times, and a very small number, really. How many more...
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post #14 of 14
I don't have flat feet. I actually have very strong arches, I think. I really like very lightweight runners. Do I need to get something with more shock absorbtion, then, to avoid shinsplints? Do my lightweight runners not give enough shock absorption?

Oh, and I have a very smooth stride, rolling heel to toe. I don't stomp, so that's not it. And I don't have any rotation.
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