or Connect
AppleInsider › Forums › Mobile › iPod + iTunes + AppleTV › First on AI: Settlement proposed in iPod class action suit
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

First on AI: Settlement proposed in iPod class action suit

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 
Users disgruntled with Apple's iPod battery claims may soon have relief.

A court has conditionally approved a settlement in a class action suit brought against Apple Computer by several consumers who claim their iPod batteries did not live up to the company's representation.

Approved by the Superior Court of California for San Mateo County, the settlement covers all consumers (class members) who purchased a first-, second-, or third-generation iPod model on or before May 31, 2004 and experienced "battery failure." Apple has agreed to the settlement without admitting fault or misrepresentation.

According to the published settlement notice, "battery failure" is when "the capacity of an iPod's battery to hold an electrical charge has dropped to four hours or less of continuous audio playback, with earbuds attached, with respect to the Third Generation iPod, or five hours or less of continuous audio playback, with earbuds attached, with respect to the First Generation iPod and the Second Generation iPod."

A fairness hearing is slated for Thursday, August 25, 2005, at 1:30 p.m., before the Honorable Beth Labson Freeman to determine whether the requested settlement should be granted and, if so, on what terms.

Settlement Benefits

Under the terms of the proposed settlement, class members who purchased or obtained a new third-generation iPod would be eligible for a one-year limited warranty extension on that iPod to cover battery failures. If the iPod experiences or has experienced battery failure during the one-year extension period, consumers who submit a valid claim have the option of returning the iPod to Apple for a replacement or receiving a Apple Store credit in the amount of $50.00.

Class members who purchased or obtained a new first- or second-generation iPod on or before May 31, 2004 and experienced battery failure within two years of purchase would receive a $50 credit at the online or retail Apple Store or a $25 reimbursement check.

Anyone who purchased or obtained one of the first three generation iPods on or before May 31, 2004 and paid for battery-related services under Apple's Battery Replacement Program before June 3, 2005, is also eligible to receive a reimbursement check for 50 percent of the cost of the service. iPod users must submit a claim to receive compensation.

Additionally, any user who also purchased an AppleCare Protection Plan (APP) for their iPod before June 3, 2005 and used the extended service warranty to obtain a replacement battery would be entitled to a $25 reimbursement.

The program also protects all class members going forward. The proposed settlement requires that Apple maintain its Battery Replacement Program for the covered class members through September 30, 2006. Furthermore, it prevents Apple from imposing any price increases on the service (and shipping charges) for covered purchases during that term.

Making a Claim

Only one settlement benefit is available for each qualifying iPod; users must submit individual claim forms for each iPod they own. To make a claim, class members can complete and submit the published claim form; as instructed and along with any required documentation.

For third-generation iPod claims, the postmark deadline for submitting a claim is two years after the original purchase date of the iPod or September 30, 2005, whichever is later. For all other claims, the postmark deadline for submitting a claim is September 30, 2005.

Attorney Compensation

If the Court approves the proposed settlement, the plaintiffs' counsel will ask the Court to award attorneys' fees and out-of-pocket expenses in the amount of $2,768,000. Apple has agreed not to oppose an award that does not exceed this figure. In addition, plaintiffs' counsel will ask the Court to award a $1,500 incentive payment to each of the class representatives for their time and effort related to the litigation--in addition to the benefits to which they are entitled under the settlement.

Apple has also agreed to pay all costs of mailed and published notices, as well as the costs of administering the settlement, but has denied and continues to deny any wrongdoing or liability as alleged by the suite.
post #2 of 12
They spent 2.7 million dollars on this lawsuit? No wonder lawyers have a bad reputation. How in the world can it cost that much?
post #3 of 12
Most of that, I'm sure, includes the lawyers' per-hour fees. If you've got half a dozen or so lawyers working for over a year on a single case, expect the cost to be in the millions.
post #4 of 12
That seems like a very reasonable settlement to me. $50 would go very nicely towards a brand new iPod since my 1st gen one is starting to show its age (even though I still love it to bits).
Wonder if this will apply to international iPod owners? (Bought mine through eBay from the US a few years ago). Hmmm...\
post #5 of 12
so who is covered under "class members"?? i have a third gen iPod that gets dirt for battery life that I bought in June or July of '03 here in the US. am i eligible to fill out this claimant form? hmmmm

nevermind, got out of lazy mode and checked out the settlement site..
pe@ce
Reply
pe@ce
Reply
post #6 of 12
Quote:
Originally posted by Trans9B
so who is covered under "class members"?? i have a third gen iPod that gets dirt for battery life that I bought in June or July of '03 here in the US. am i eligible to fill out this claimant form? hmmmm

nevermind, got out of lazy mode and checked out the settlement site..

Trans,

Second paragraph:
'...the settlement covers all consumers (class members) who purchased a first-, second-, or third-generation iPod model on or before May 31, 2004 and experienced "battery failure."'

Kasper =P
EIC- AppleInsider.com
Questions and comments to : kasper@appleinsider.com
Reply
EIC- AppleInsider.com
Questions and comments to : kasper@appleinsider.com
Reply
post #7 of 12
Does iPod mini count as a 3rd generation iPod? My mini's battery is at 3.5 hours max after a year of heavy use, even when I was conservative with charges to the point that I'd only plug it in every 3 days or so.

Now of course I can barely go all day on a charge.

Got AppleCare just to get the battery replaced, once soon and once again before the two years are up.

Not complaining... well, ok, not complaining too much. I think I have a valid complaint though as I took care of my iPod and the battery life is "the sucks".
Download BARTsmart BART Widget, the best BART schedule widget for Mac OS X's Dashboard.
Reply
Download BARTsmart BART Widget, the best BART schedule widget for Mac OS X's Dashboard.
Reply
post #8 of 12
thats a US only programm, right?
post #9 of 12
Quote:
Most of that, I'm sure, includes the lawyers' per-hour fees. If you've got half a dozen or so lawyers working for over a year on a single case, expect the cost to be in the millions.

The point here is that instead of spending $2.7M and passing that expense into the poor suckers that buy ipods, Apple should have admitted there was problem and replaced the defective batteries/ iPod without litigation.

There are instances when litigation is needed, and I don't pretend to be an expert in that area. But when the product is defective, a responsible business doesn't wait until its cutomers take it court.
post #10 of 12
i just got a notice from Apple about the iPod, since i have a first-gen. i think i'll scan in the documents and see if i can post them with any clarity, then people can see what they say. mostly, the AI article covered it. 1st/2nd gen- 5 or less hours, 3rd gen- 4 or less hours. It asks for when you bought it, when you experienced battery failure, and for first gen, it just needs a basic claim and for the 3rd gen, it asks for the proof of purchase and some sort of receipt or credit card bill or the like that shows that you bought it. i'll post the images later if possible
Macbook Pro
2.16 GHz Core 2 Duo
160GB HD
2GB RAM
Reply
Macbook Pro
2.16 GHz Core 2 Duo
160GB HD
2GB RAM
Reply
post #11 of 12
I am so angry. My 3G iPod is only about a year old (bought it on May 11, 2004) and the battery inside is completely messed up. I can charge my iPod fully up and it will work ok (the battery drains faster than usual), but that's not the problem. If I let it sit for awhile (where it actually shuts off instead of going into sleep), then when I turn it back on, the battery is completely dead and it tells me to charge it.

I wonder if I can get in on this lawsuit.
post #12 of 12
In the mail Saturday I received a mailing from Apple about the iPod battery settlement. It included instructions for filling out the claim form and the claim form. I hadn't contacted Apple about this so I'm assuming there may be the same mailing going out to all those who registered their 1, 2 amd 3-gen iPods with Apple.

In my case, last year my 2-gen iPod started getting around 3-hours battery life. I ended up replacing the battery myself with one of Newer's high capacity batteries, which I'm very satisfied with.

Anyway, I'll be sending the claim form in this week. I'll probably go with the $50 credit.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: iPod + iTunes + AppleTV
AppleInsider › Forums › Mobile › iPod + iTunes + AppleTV › First on AI: Settlement proposed in iPod class action suit