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G5 - The truth - Page 13

post #481 of 490
Perhaps there is another thread more suited for this info but here goes...
G4 7470 1.5GHz supports PC2100 DDR-SDRAM @ 266MHZ <a href="http://www.applelinks.com/articles/2002/05/20020524162055.shtml" target="_blank">http://www.applelinks.com/articles/2002/05/20020524162055.shtml</a>
How credible is this? Does this guy check sources? Is this just the Register rumor circulating around?
If no G5 I want to believe this.

<img src="graemlins/hmmm.gif" border="0" alt="[Hmmm]" />
post #482 of 490
It's just the Register rumor recycled:

From the article:
[quote]
Various rumorial sources readily available Webwise to anyone with half a mouse have posited [...]
<hr></blockquote>

In other words, he's just retelling the same stuff we've seen before.
post #483 of 490
It wouldn't make sense for Apple to use a new, un-FIELD-tested CPU in a server. Apple needed to make some bandwidth improvements for the XServe, but even if a CPU that supported DDRRAM was to be available in June, it would have been too big of a risk to use it in the intended markets.

So Apple's hack is the best solution available for the XServe. It's better than straight SDRAM, and better than using a new CPU.
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post #484 of 490
One thing I haven't seen mentioned yet: there have been rumours of MPX-based DDR motherboards around for over a year now. That implies that Apple has had a working chipset for at least that long, and hasn't released it yet. It may be that they didn't want to get hammered for using a "hack solution" in their desktop/notebook machines. The benchmarked performance improvement just wouldn't be enough to warrant it, but it actually made a lot of sense for a server. Only after a great deal of testing would they feel comfortable releasing a server based on a "new" chipset (at least I hope that is the case!). This means that they had the chipset design lying around anyhow, so why not use it for something even though a completely new chipset & processor was just about to arrive.

This implies, of course, that they are waiting for a bigger leap. As I said above, the on-chip memory controller / RapidIO bus design should be cheaper to build than the MPX-based design due to RIO being a fast & narrow bus and the memory being kept close ot the processor. It makes a lot of sense for all of Apple's other machines: towers, iMac, iBook, PB. Cheaper, better, faster.

There is another alternative as well, that I'll throw into the ring while I'm at it, just to muddy the waters further: Apple has been designing their own chipsets for years, and that level of integration gives them lots of advantages. They can (and have) built a chipset that talks to all the devices in the system, which means that the processor only needs to talk to the chipset. Currently no other devices talk to the processor via MPX. This means to replace the MPX all you need to do is replace the processor and the chipset. Chipset is obviously a no-brainer, and we all have heard that Apple has gotten more involved in the processor design end of things. So while Motorola prefers RapidIO for a lot of good reasons (from their point of view), Apple doesn't really care about it that much... and they sit on the HyperTransport consortium. Imagine, if you will, a 12 gigabyte/second pipe from the CPU to the memory controller which is completely under Apple's control. This situation would be one of great happiness and joy for Apple because now they could design a killer motherboard to feed their processor's voracious appetite. Put multiple HyperTransport links onto the chipset along with bus snooping logic and you have a muliprocessor. If you get buddy buddy with ATI and/or nVidia and they give you a HyperTransport graphics solution (they are on the HT consortium as well, and talking it up -- sockets have to be coming soon) then you've got massive bandwidth to the graphics engine as well. You also avoid the problems inherent in a per-processor memory design.

No evidence, of course, but it does show that there are other possibilities.
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post #485 of 490
Very clever, Programmer, and just a few weeks ago, nVidia was commenting about some cool work they are doing with Apple. Can't just be another graphics card. Hmmm...
post #486 of 490
[quote]Originally posted by Programmer:
<strong>Snip

There is another alternative as well, that I'll throw into the ring while I'm at it, just to muddy the waters further: Apple has been designing their own chipsets for years, and that level of integration gives them lots of advantages. They can (and have) built a chipset that talks to all the devices in the system, which means that the processor only needs to talk to the chipset. Currently no other devices talk to the processor via MPX. This means to replace the MPX all you need to do is replace the processor and the chipset. Chipset is obviously a no-brainer, and we all have heard that Apple has gotten more involved in the processor design end of things. So while Motorola prefers RapidIO for a lot of good reasons (from their point of view), Apple doesn't really care about it that much... and they sit on the HyperTransport consortium. Imagine, if you will, a 12 gigabyte/second pipe from the CPU to the memory controller which is completely under Apple's control. This situation would be one of great happiness and joy for Apple because now they could design a killer motherboard to feed their processor's voracious appetite. Put multiple HyperTransport links onto the chipset along with bus snooping logic and you have a muliprocessor. If you get buddy buddy with ATI and/or nVidia and they give you a HyperTransport graphics solution (they are on the HT consortium as well, and talking it up -- sockets have to be coming soon) then you've got massive bandwidth to the graphics engine as well. You also avoid the problems inherent in a per-processor memory design.

No evidence, of course, but it does show that there are other possibilities.</strong><hr></blockquote>

I would like to also add that Apple about 4 years ago when SOC was the next thing said that they were not interested in SOC. They felt that it made chip development slower and they would rather have a system with 2 chips, a system chip and the processors. Which is what Apple has done with Xserve. What Programmer is saying would be the next step, but I'm sure that there could be half steps. As much as I would like to see a HT solution.
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post #487 of 490
[quote]Originally posted by b8rtm8nn:
<strong>Very clever, Programmer, and just a few weeks ago, nVidia was commenting about some cool work they are doing with Apple. Can't just be another graphics card. Hmmm...</strong><hr></blockquote>

hopefully it was vague enough to avoid the wrath of Steve would stink for both of them for such a neat thing to be "ATI-ed"
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post #488 of 490
[quote]Originally posted by BobtheTomato:
<strong>hopefully it was vague enough to avoid the wrath of Steve would stink for both of them for such a neat thing to be "ATI-ed" </strong><hr></blockquote>

Heh, well I can officially state that I have no actual knowledge of anything related to unreleased Apple products. Everything I say in this forum is based on what I like to this is "semi-informed technical" speculation. And I think it would be way cool.
Providing grist for the rumour mill since 2001.
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Providing grist for the rumour mill since 2001.
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post #489 of 490
Way cool! doesn't sound unlikely for the G5 i think, but what are the chances of moto making a G4 that supports hypertransport? Is it more difficult/expensive to do than DDR? The G4 is obviously getting some kind of overhaul anyway, but will apple foot the bill for this if the G5 is close to release?

Bring the light Programmer!
post #490 of 490
Double post.

[ 05-28-2002: Message edited by: LowB-ing ]</p>
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