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Running - Page 2

post #41 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by tonton View Post

Remember, all the world-champion Ethiopian marathon runners train in bare feet, so it's definitely possible to run (with proper technique) with thin soles and still avoid injury.

Are you sure they do that anymore? If you don't have perfect feet, good shoes are a must. Even so, I haven't gotten shin splints since I finished growing, but I have hurt my knees ... mostly from running in thin-soled soccer boots.


Quote:
Originally Posted by ShawnJ View Post

On that point, where does everyone get cramps? I get them exclusively in my shoulders.

Try moving your arms more in tune with your stride, and with the elbow closer to a 90 degree angle. Doing so will also help avoid abdominal cramping, which incidentally is the only place I cramp. I can especially prevent it by avoiding eating for several hours before running and by better synchronizing my breathing.
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post #42 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by ShawnJ View Post

Now what exactly is a "runner's high?"

My question is, is the "runner's high" an uninterrupted feeling of euphoria, is it more periodic, or does it vary from person to person? During the end of my last workout, I pushed myself pretty hard and just after inhaling it felt different from normal breathing. It was slightly euphoric. But then I would feel the pain again right after. So it only lasted a second or two at most over and over again.

I think it's what you get afterwards. It is for me. I feel tremendous about an hour after I finish and carry on feeling really good for a few hours.

Running's pretty great.
post #43 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by ShawnJ View Post

On that point, where does everyone get cramps?

I get them exclusively in my shoulders.

When my shoulders start hurting during a run it usually means I need new running shoes.
post #44 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hassan i Sabbah View Post

I think it's what you get afterwards. It is for me. I feel tremendous about an hour after I finish and carry on feeling really good for a few hours.

The effect lasts for about 40 mins for me, and it is amplified by beer. The springtime wheat beers are really nice after a run.
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post #45 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Splinemodel View Post

Are you sure they do that anymore? If you don't have perfect feet, good shoes are a must. Even so, I haven't gotten shin splints since I finished growing, but I have hurt my knees ... mostly from running in thin-soled soccer boots.

I've decided to make an investment in proper running shoes.

If I understand this "pronation" concept correctly, disproportionate wear on the outside part of my soles means that I underpronate (or supinate). So I should look for shoes with a lot of cushioning but without any supporting devices that would further discourage pronation. Does that sound right?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Splinemodel View Post

Try moving your arms more in tune with your stride, and with the elbow closer to a 90 degree angle. Doing so will also help avoid abdominal cramping, which incidentally is the only place I cramp. I can especially prevent it by avoiding eating for several hours before running and by better synchronizing my breathing.

Ah, that's helped a lot.

I haven't had any shoulder cramps since I've been conscious not to let my arms fall out of stride.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hassan i Sabbah View Post

I think it's what you get afterwards. It is for me. I feel tremendous about an hour after I finish and carry on feeling really good for a few hours.

Yeah, I definitely feel better after a run than I do before a run.

It's just not euphoric. More like "pleased."
post #46 of 59
I've had too many aches and pains, so I run on a treadmill nowadays. I've got an iMac in front of it, and I watch TV shows for a 45-minute run - the first couple seasons of Lost, and now I'm going through seasons of 24.

The treadmill is quite different. It's definitely easier on my feet, but at the same time, it's not even close to the same degree of exercise, I suppose because of the bounciness of the running platform. It takes me 45 minutes to get as winded as about 15 minutes running on the street.
post #47 of 59
Found some cool links.

This "Age Grading Calculator" lets you know how you're doing in comparison to people around your age group. After about a week of running I have my 5k time down to 24 minutes, which puts me a little above average. Nothing to brag about.

I'm really only running to get my energy level up for the insane amount of studying I have to do this month. (It's working). But you know, it would be nice to get better for other reasons. One thing I noticed is that my body seems perfectly capable of running fast. It's just my damn heart and lungs holding me back! So I found this link about improving your VO2 Max.

Quote:
Consistent aerobic conditioning will increase your max, but only by so much. French exercise physiologist Veronique Billat found that the fastest way to reach your potential is to run intervals at a speed that elicits your VO2 max, a pace known in lab circles as velocity. This pace is equivalent to 3,000-meter pace or the fastest effort you can maintain for about eight minutes. To reap a training benefit, however, you only need to sustain that pace for two to five minutes, which is what I did every Tuesday for 20 ye
post #48 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by ShawnJ View Post

One thing I noticed is that my body seems perfectly capable of running fast. It's just my damn heart and lungs holding me back!

Heh. Not everyone can be perfect. If I had a better heart and feet (my lungs are big), I too would be a much better runner, but I guess that's life.

No surprise that interval training improves your aerobic capacity...
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post #49 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hassan i Sabbah View Post

I think it's what you get afterwards. It is for me. I feel tremendous about an hour after I finish and carry on feeling really good for a few hours.

Now I get it.

This is a runner's high. It feels pretty good except for the whole part about what you have to do to get it.

Like most highs for that matter.

post #50 of 59
So, I eventually ended up hurting my left knee.

This is rather embarrassing, but I hurt it by overextending it when I propped my legs up on my desk to read for an extended time during finals month. I didn't feel any pain then, but when running the next day I decided to "run through" pain I felt in the middle of the run. I didn't perceive at the time that it was "stop or you'll hurt yourself, shawn" pain; I just thought it was "oh ignore that, mind over matter" pain.

Mistake.

I've been out of commission for a very long time. I tried running several weeks later and I still felt something I shouldn't. It's a pain on the outside of my knee towards the back. I re-injured it again two weeks ago during a drunken escapade (god knows how), so this is turning into quite a problem for me. Luckily, I have time to bike now, and biking doesn't affect it one bit. I'm considering biking to work now.

Still, I don't know what's going on with that knee...
post #51 of 59
What part of the knee? If it is around the top of the kneecap I think that it is usually tendonitis, if it feels like it is underneath the kneecap it might be serious. If it is around the outside (below where your hands hang) it might be IT band friction swelling.

Did you see a doctor about it? Knee injuries are no joke.
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post #52 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by e1618978 View Post

What part of the knee? If it is around the top of the kneecap I think that it is usually tendonitis, if it feels like it is underneath the kneecap it might be serious. If it is around the outside (below where your hands hang) it might be IT band friction swelling.

Did you see a doctor about it? Knee injuries are no joke.

Didn't see a doctor yet, although I do have bare-bones health insurance.

The pain is definitely around the outside, so it sounds like it could be that IT band friction swelling thing.
post #53 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by ShawnJ View Post

Didn't see a doctor yet, although I do have bare-bones health insurance.

The pain is definitely around the outside, so it sounds like it could be that IT band friction swelling thing.

What they gave me for that was lots of anti-inflamitories (like super-advils). Onions and garlic also help, and icing it if the injury is still a bit raw.

Afterwards, once the healing is totally complete, stretch the outside of your leg before and after running or whatever:

http://www.rice.edu/~jenky/sports/itband.html

It works even better (but looks less macho) if you lean your torso towards your back foot. If it is IT band friction, it is caused by the sides of your legs being too tight, which makes the tendon at the end pop in and out of the bone slot in your knee.
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post #54 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by ShawnJ View Post

Didn't see a doctor yet, although I do have bare-bones health insurance.

The pain is definitely around the outside, so it sounds like it could be that IT band friction swelling thing.

Just give it rest. You can also overload on a high-quality glucosamine compound (like Cosamin DS) if you think it's a joint issue. FWIW, if you run regularly you should be taking a half-dose of glucosamine compound anyway. It really does seem to help.

I have had the same kind of injury as you, except from kicking balls (rugby balls, soccer balls). Give it about one to three months of rest, depending on how serious it is. If you're a pro soccer player and each week missed is $200k down the toilet, then arthroscopic surgery can fix you up fast, but for most of us this isn't the case.
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post #55 of 59
Just starting to run again

Very tough to start again as I can't even run 1/5th what I used to be able
post #56 of 59
I used to run 5k a couple times a week. Last summer we moved from ~ sea level to 9,500 feet and my typical 25 minute 5k took about 33 minutes. Didn't run much after that. Need to get back at it.
post #57 of 59
Who is digging up all of these old threads!?

This one's older than the hills!

Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

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Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

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post #58 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by progmac View Post

I used to run 5k a couple times a week. Last summer we moved from ~ sea level to 9,500 feet and my typical 25 minute 5k took about 33 minutes. Didn't run much after that. Need to get back at it.

Me too - it isn't just the altitude, but the bright sun, at 9500 feet you get 40% (or so) more light hitting you due to less air between you and the sun. I am really noticing the difference even at 5500 feet.

I just bought a concept II rowing machine, which I will start using every other day once it gets here. You get more of a full body workout than running, and you don't get a sunburn.

http://www.concept2.com/us/default.asp
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post #59 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by ShawnJ View Post

On that point, where does everyone get cramps?

I get them exclusively in my shoulders.

I get 'em in my shoulder too, which I thought was so weird at the time. At least I'm not alone!
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