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Saying goodbye to Apple's eMac

post #1 of 47
Thread Starter 
Apple's eMac computer is soon to become nothing more than a collector's item.

Only three years after introducing the eMac for its education customers, sources are reporting that Apple is ready to permanently discontinue the Mac model.

Introduced on April 29th, 2002, the eMac all-in-one desktop was coined "the most affordable G4 system ever." It featured a 700 MHz PowerPC G4 processor and a built-in 17-inch flat CRT display.

In the three-plus years that would follow, the eMac saw only minimal updates, recently topping out at 1.42GHz -- a revision Apple introduced quietly in May of this year without notifying the press.

Although the eMac initially served its purpose in catering to educational institutions that required the "complete package" in a single enclosure at a low cost, its CRT-based design has since grown dated.

Today Apple is able to offer its educational customers a more fashionable all-in-one package with its new flat-panel iMac, and a low-cost solution with its sub-$500 Mac mini.

For Apple, the design of the eMac may have also become burden to produce and revise. According to industry source, the eMac's all-in-one enclosure was the most expensive part of the computer to manufacturer and was uneasily modified.

As of Tuesday afternoon, Apple had yet to issue an official end-of-life notice for existing eMacs, but sources familiar with the matter were told by the company not to expect new models.

Providing further evidence of the discontinuation is Apple's own website and online store, both of which appear to be phasing out references to the computer.

Apple is expected to continue to sell the eMac until existing inventory is exhausted.
post #2 of 47
goodbye
post #3 of 47
I don't know what the sales to ed. customers have been around the country, but they are still popular here in NYC.

It is popular because it is an all in one, and sturdy as well. The price is also popular.

I'm not sure the iMac is a suitable overall replacememt in K-12.
post #4 of 47
the eMac is still available to schools through the Apple Store for Education. (it's no longer available to students or teachers to purchase for use at home, but it's still listed on the page for schools to buy equipment)

Don't forget, this started out as an education-only model and it was not released to the general public for several months after it was announced. It has now returned to its original status.

I think it will stick around for a few more months, but eventually I would expect Apple to tell its education customers to buy the Mac mini and get their CRTs elsewhere.
post #5 of 47
Over at MR there's much silly debate over whether the eMac or Mac Mini is "better." Obviously they BOTH have their own advantages.

eMac: faster (HD), speakers, mic, audio-in, all-in-one simplicity, more USB ports, and no hassle of finding your own peripherals. And CRTs are durable in schools. Mac Mini: flexible, small, light, and CHEAP! And not locked into one display. Great for switchers/adders.

If demand for the eMac has dropped, then so be it. But I do wonder if something new might replace it...

I hope Apple starts to sell a low-end LCD or CRT, because otherwise there is no more "one stop shop" for low-end Mac buyers.

PS, I still like my eMac First-gen, 700 Mhz, still going strong.
post #6 of 47
Good riddance. Ugly step-child. Poor CRT.

It was dated.

EOL.

Lemon Bon Bon
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post #7 of 47


notice the gap in the image where the emac gif has been removed. Its a different color.
post #8 of 47
Quote:
Originally posted by Lemon Bon Bon
Good riddance. Ugly step-child. Poor CRT.

It was dated.

EOL.

Lemon Bon Bon

Your not liking it doesn't mean that it is bad.

In a K-12 context an LCD is much less durable than a crt.

I've seen the Dell LCD's in PC labs destroyed from kids sticking pencil and pen points to the screen. The eMacs are almost indestructible.
post #9 of 47
I'll second the request for a new lcd-based iMac (low cost, like the mini, not like the iMac)...and for a 17" lcd monitor...DELL actually does something similar...the monitor and computer are physically sperate but they're mounted on the same pedestal.
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post #10 of 47
Quote:
Originally posted by melgross
I've seen the Dell LCD's in PC labs destroyed from kids sticking pencil and pen points to the screen. The eMacs are almost indestructible.

So they have taste...

But yes, you're right...maybe Apple can come up with a solution...they are Apple after all...

Incidentially, my school has the 100 or so of the Dell systems I described above and to my knowledge, vandalism hasn't really been a problem, but then I suppose it varies by school. Before that we had G3 iMacs and we had problems with people messing up the cd drives and the floppy drives on the IBM's that we had at the time. (the Dells don't have CD or floppy drives)
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post #11 of 47
Quote:
Originally posted by mynamehere
So they have taste...

But yes, you're right...maybe Apple can come up with a solution...they are Apple after all...

Incidentially, my school has the 100 or so of the Dell systems I described above and to my knowledge, vandalism hasn't really been a problem, but then I suppose it varies by school. Before that we had G3 iMacs and we had problems with people messing up the cd drives and the floppy drives on the IBM's that we had at the time. (the Dells don't have CD or floppy drives)

I wasn't actually picking on Dell. Here in NYC Dell and Apple are the only approved vendors. In fact the Bd of Ed buys its Macs and service for them through - Dell!
post #12 of 47
Quote:
Originally posted by nagromme
eMac: ..., more USB ports, ...

And two FW ports.

The eMac's fan is significantly noisier.

Quote:
PS, I still like my eMac First-gen, 700 Mhz, still going strong.

1.25Ghz here, bought during the long wait between the iMac G4 -> G5 transition. My wife and EyeTV are happily sharing it.

Personally, I think the eMac was a better value than the mini. And easily a better value than the last overpriced iMac G4, which I liked but couldn't justify buying when I suspected the end was near for that model.
post #13 of 47
Well, I kept forgetting that the eMac existed, and I guess this is proof of that. I thought it was the ugliest desktop Apple offered, too. I'd rather see schools save a bit of cash by going with the mini and their current computer monitors.
post #14 of 47
Quote:
Originally posted by FireEmblemPride
Well, I kept forgetting that the eMac existed, and I guess this is proof of that. I thought it was the ugliest desktop Apple offered, too. I'd rather see schools save a bit of cash by going with the mini and their current computer monitors.

Schools prefer simplicity. The less cables to have, to plug in, to unplug when moving machines around, to find the cables again, to plug it back together. No, they would rather an all-in-one. Apple has been selling all-in-one computers to schools for many years. The 5400 all-in-one's were very popular. Many are still in use after all these years.
post #15 of 47
Cmon guys, its sad when a faitful computer is disontinued sob sob
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post #16 of 47
I always thought an eServer + low-cost thin clients would be good for education customers... Imagine a 17" iMac design with optional CD/DVD drive and flash memory instead of a hard drive.
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post #17 of 47
I like mine. good solid peice of kit. bought it when i couldn't afford an angel-poise iMac. Now though I'll be saving up to go top-end on the iMac though as it seems so good.

agree with everyone that Apple should allow a one-stop-shop for cheaper customers as well. Maybe they could drop the price of their displays or bring out a cheap line.... maybe a bad idea... but they should do something.... not everyone needs an iBook.
post #18 of 47
Quote:
Originally posted by Lemon Bon Bon
Good riddance. Ugly step-child. Poor CRT.

It was dated.

EOL.

Lemon Bon Bon

Have you actually used an eMac? The screens are amazing. Flat, crisp, bright. Top quality next to standard PC monitors (which I use daily).

We all thought it was ugly, but it grew on us (I think I speak for most). Apple created it to meet a demand placed upon them by the educational market (after they announced the death of CRT). It served its purpose will, and for that, it was a notable product.

Onwards and upwards, though.
post #19 of 47
Quote:
Originally posted by coolfactor
Have you actually used an eMac? The screens are amazing. Flat, crisp, bright. Top quality next to standard PC monitors (which I use daily).

We all thought it was ugly, but it grew on us (I think I speak for most). Apple created it to meet a demand placed upon them by the educational market (after they announced the death of CRT). It served its purpose will, and for that, it was a notable product.

Onwards and upwards, though.

Hear, hear!
post #20 of 47
My school just got a classroom full of these suckers for photoshop.
post #21 of 47
Quote:
Originally posted by alliancep.s.i
My school just got a classroom full of these suckers for photoshop.

That's what I'm saying. Not the most advanced, but simple, reliable, and powerful enough for that purpose. A slightly higher rez screen would help, but it's all down to cost.
post #22 of 47
Quote:
Originally posted by FireEmblemPride
Well, I kept forgetting that the eMac existed, and I guess this is proof of that. I thought it was the ugliest desktop Apple offered, too. I'd rather see schools save a bit of cash by going with the mini and their current computer monitors.

And I'd rather see schools save a bit of cash by using sturdy computers that last more than 3 years. Your short-term view of economics is part of the problem.
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post #23 of 47
Quote:
Originally posted by geekdreams
I always thought an eServer + low-cost thin clients would be good for education customers... Imagine a 17" iMac design with optional CD/DVD drive and flash memory instead of a hard drive.

And I'm afraid you have little clue about the IT support found in your average middle school.

Man, the number of people who think they know how to run schools is just amazing. "No CPU left behind!!!"
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post #24 of 47
Quote:
Originally posted by MacGregor
And I'd rather see schools save a bit of cash by using sturdy computers that last more than 3 years. Your short-term view of economics is part of the problem.

The other thing he doesn't see is that most of these schools will be coming from an old 5400 all in one anyway, so they won't have monitors.
post #25 of 47
Quote:
Originally posted by MacGregor
And I'm afraid you have little clue about the IT support found in your average middle school.

Man, the number of people who think they know how to run schools is just amazing. "No CPU left behind!!!"

Yeah, schools don't upgrade until they HAVE to. I've got guys scrounging around for 4MB simms.

When the PC labs are down, it can take three days until most schools can get them working again. One Dell lab in my daughters HS has been down for a week because of a virus. Thank god they are now putting in a $100,000 Mac lab. It's an art and performing arts HS here in NY, so computers are very important. They've been screaming for a Mac lab for two years, so I've been told (it's her first year). They are a rare school in that they have a full time tech as well as a computer teacher who does nothing except work the computers, and still they haven't gotten the PC lab up.

Middle schools and below are much worse in that regard.
post #26 of 47
Quote:
Originally posted by melgross
The other thing he doesn't see is that most of these schools will be coming from an old 5400 all in one anyway, so they won't have monitors.

And I didn't mean to rag on him, but the education market can use both AIO's and Mac Mini's with monitors and that is the way it should be. Each school should be able to figure these things out on their own. The problem is often school boards and parent groups, who haven't stepped into a classroom in decades, thinking they know more than teachers.

One other advantage of the eMac was one of the problems that some in this thread have described. The eMac didn't update nearly as often as other boxes. That is an ADVANTAGE in schools that would incur greater costs if forced to upgrade accessories, programs, etc. Again, schools aren't designed to run like home offices.

i wish Apple was able to keep the choice open for schools. If they lose the option for the really nice, reliable, ugly so students won't steal them, upgradeable, Mac-centric all-in-ones, then they are going to only have little boxes and LCD screens to choose from and then there will be less reason to choose a Mac, because a Mini behind the monitor isn't any more rugged or special than a Dell behind the monitor.
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post #27 of 47
The school buying season is over and I think Apple will run the inventory out in preparation for an eMactel.

I have to say that I liked the eMac - it worked very for a lot of people and some of these will move up to iMacs in future years. The displays I have seen were damn good and the power is close to my year old PB. I think that the ones in the supply line may go fast - Apple will probably let resellers drop the price to move them, but most will probably hold the price for a while.

So now is the time for the guessing game on the eMactel.
Ken
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post #28 of 47
I've now also read that Apple will just be withdrawing them from individual purchase. so maybe they aren't being discontinued just yet.

Perhaps the non-edu. purchases have dropped too much since the Mini came out.
post #29 of 47
Quote:
Originally posted by MacGregor
And I'd rather see schools save a bit of cash by using sturdy computers that last more than 3 years. Your short-term view of economics is part of the problem.

Are you saying the Mac mini isn't sturdy? The only flaw I can see in using them would be theft, but then they might as well go with PCs for that (or, yes, the eMac). You're assuming the Mac mini and/or monitors (I'm guessing that's what you meant) would break down in three years, but in my anecdotal experience, it's always been either the keyboards, mouse (ball theft) or software itself for Windows. Do you have sufficient evidence to back up such a strong claim?

Quote:
Originally posted by melgross
The other thing he doesn't see is that most of these schools will be coming from an old 5400 all in one anyway, so they won't have monitors.

Not all schools use Apple computers; probably just as many are still on PCs with adequate monitors; I know in my area, most if not all schools use plain Jane PCs from some giveaway program a few years back. Coming from California (and San Francisco) where school budgets (and property) are central issues, you have to understand it from my perspective as well. So it's not an issue of me having "short-term economic views" as someone simplistically claimed.

I can see if schools had AIO's to begin with, then the eMac is a good solution. But it's simply better for school switchers to go with the Mac mini to avoid dealing with additional disposal costs and tons of other complicated fees associated with computers.
post #30 of 47
I rarely disagree with some of the stuff posted on this site, but in this case I seriously doubt that they are discontinuing the eMac.

As a person who recommends educational purchases, the eMac is hugely popular in our district. We have a couple hundred of them. Most other schools who use Mac buy this model.

The Mac Mini is simply not a suitable replacement in this setting. They are so small that they can easily be stolen. I would hate to have to purchase security cables along with these Macs. The slow laptop hard drive in these models is somewhat suspect, along with only 1 memory slot restricting you to the configuration that you purchased. Not to mention trying to dig up monitors from who knows where.

For our more professional users, Apple did throw use a curve by discontinuing the G5 Tower single CPU model, which we did find occasion to use.

I am not sure that the iMac G5 is appropriate either...it lacks expansion needed in a "Pro" model, and lacks the durability and price point of an entry level model like the eMac.

If Apple were to scrap the eMac entirely, I'm sure it would be replaced by something equivalent in scope. The main concern nowadays with the eMac in a lab setting seems to be the power requirements and footprint, but with an LCD built-in instead of a CRT, it may solve those issues. Maybe Apple will simply come up with an iMac at a substantially reduced price point for schools.
post #31 of 47
Quote:
Originally posted by FireEmblemPride
Are you saying the Mac mini isn't sturdy? The only flaw I can see in using them would be theft, but then they might as well go with PCs for that (or, yes, the eMac). You're assuming the Mac mini and/or monitors (I'm guessing that's what you meant) would break down in three years, but in my anecdotal experience, it's always been either the keyboards, mouse (ball theft) or software itself for Windows. Do you have sufficient evidence to back up such a strong claim?



Not all schools use Apple computers; probably just as many are still on PCs with adequate monitors; I know in my area, most if not all schools use plain Jane PCs from some giveaway program a few years back. Coming from California (and San Francisco) where school budgets (and property) are central issues, you have to understand it from my perspective as well. So it's not an issue of me having "short-term economic views" as someone simplistically claimed.

I can see if schools had AIO's to begin with, then the eMac is a good solution. But it's simply better for school switchers to go with the Mac mini to avoid dealing with additional disposal costs and tons of other complicated fees associated with computers.

The eMac is sturdy because it is an all in one. One of the first things to go is the cable. Eliminating the cables eliminates one problem. The eMac only needs (other than the mouse and keyboard cables of course) one power cable. The Mini needs two power cables and one monitor cable. Setup is much more difficult because not only is it more time consuming but also because you now need twice as many power jacks under the tables. 70 for one lab instead of 35. All of this is counting. We also have steel anti-theft devices for the machines. Now you eould have to have one for the computer and one for the monitor. More time and expense. I have never heard of a school district anywhere around the country that didn't have at least some problems with theft.

LCD's are also vulnerable to damage to a degree that crt's simply are not.

And, of course, if schools don't already have Mac's that they are replacing then naturally the situation is somewhat different. But the eMac is simply a perfect solution for a middle school or lower. High schools are always a more complex situation.
post #32 of 47
Quote:
Originally posted by FireEmblemPride
Are you saying the Mac mini isn't sturdy? The only flaw I can see in using them would be theft, but then they might as well go with PCs for that (or, yes, the eMac). You're assuming the Mac mini and/or monitors (I'm guessing that's what you meant) would break down in three years, but in my anecdotal experience, it's always been either the keyboards, mouse (ball theft) or software itself for Windows. Do you have sufficient evidence to back up such a strong claim?

So it's not an issue of me having "short-term economic views" as someone simplistically claimed.

Yes I do have a mountain of evidence. I have been a teacher and I have worked in a museum computer lab that is open to the public and gets much more use by the general public than any school computer lab that I know. And we used the old crt iMacs and LCD Dell comps and usually kept the lab about 50:50 ratios and had a rotation of replacement of replacing 1/3 of the computers every 3 years...depending upon the budget. It was painfully obvious how much easier the Macs were to maintain and upgrade by software. In terms of hardware the iMacs and then eMacs held up much better than the Dells which not only fell over more often, but were basically cheaply constructed. So that may not be a fair assessment of AIO vs Mac mini's obviously, but cables and power cord management and the difficulty of adding periferals from behind or under desks with the pc's was just a pain.

In short the iMacs and eMacs were workhorses, though of course the original iMacs eventually had too small of screens. The only advantage of a mini would be the ability to replace a bad one with a good one and work on it in the back and keep the lab running, but the eMacs broke down so rarely, it wasn't an issue.

And the "economics" over a three year period made the eMacs a cheaper investment. Any more questions?
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post #33 of 47
The eMac is currently not listed on the Apple Education store...
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post #34 of 47
Well, I had nothing particular against the emac lineup, but one thing is making me bloody nervous about them. At this stage all my rev A-D imacs' screens are dying, which makes me think that in about two years my emacs are going to become a huge liability. Still, full credit to apple, as the emac and mini are the only two model lines that I haven't needed to repair, let alone send back under warranty. I hope in three years time I still haven't had to buy the stupid plaster knife tool...

Roll on the intel based mini, and finally we'll have performance at a reasonable price I say. For all of you complaining about fingers and pencils on lcds, I say start up a company that makes nice glass covers for lcds. I'd buy a lot of them, and I'm sure the other whiners would too. Without impact damage, LCDs are so much more durable, it's a pitty such a stupid vunerability keeps people living in the past. It's time the emac dies (in the crt form at least), then again, as long as apple continues making the mini, I don't really care what other crud they sell.
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post #35 of 47
I'm a bit frustrated by this move, as I was in the middle of trying to sell my computer so I could buy an eMac with a gig of ram, however since in all likely hodd I won't be seeing an eMac for awhile I'm kinda screwed.

I'm hoping to get 1700 (CAD) for my money, which puts even the low end iMac well out of my reach (including tax and warranty) and I'm not touching the Mac mini with a ten foot pole. Terrible graphics solution, one ram slot, simply isn't worth it to me. I'll miss the eMac, as it was a cost effective alternative for those of is who couldn't afford the iMac line, but didn't want to sacrifice Conveinant Ram expandibility and a decent graphics solution.

Oh well, maybe the intel based Mini's won't horribly suck, and we'll get a decent price point replacement (I'd be all over a Mini with a bigger video card and two ram slots.)

Well, I guess I'll just keep trying to sell my PC, and put the money away until Apple releases something accessible to me, and use my laptop until then, oh well.
post #36 of 47
Quote:
Originally posted by Alcibiades
I'm a bit frustrated by this move, as I was in the middle of trying to sell my computer so I could buy an eMac with a gig of ram, however since in all likely hodd I won't be seeing an eMac for awhile I'm kinda screwed.

Check eBay and I bet you'll find a good eMac from either someone upgrading to the new iMacs or from a reseller with extras. You'll have a good machine with probably added RAM and it will last at least 3 years. The good (and bad for thrifty shoppers) thing about Macs is that they hold their value.
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post #37 of 47
Quote:
Originally posted by MacGregor
Check eBay and I bet you'll find a good eMac from either someone upgrading to the new iMacs or from a reseller with extras. You'll have a good machine with probably added RAM and it will last at least 3 years. The good (and bad for thrifty shoppers) thing about Macs is that they hold their value.

Good. I was going to suggest that as well.
post #38 of 47
Unfortunatly, I'll get little to no warranty, and have to pay a rather hefty amount and shipping, as well as take the gamble anyone takes when they buy used. I think I'll just wait, and get something directly from Apple (or an Apple retailer) that I know I can get repaired should the need arise.
post #39 of 47
Quote:
Originally posted by Alcibiades
Unfortunatly, I'll get little to no warranty, and have to pay a rather hefty amount and shipping, as well as take the gamble anyone takes when they buy used. I think I'll just wait, and get something directly from Apple (or an Apple retailer) that I know I can get repaired should the need arise.

Then buy a referbished one.
post #40 of 47
As far as I know, the online Canadian apple store does not offer refurbished items.
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