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Apple readies Australian iTunes music store (again)

post #1 of 25
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After several failed attempts, Apple is once again preparing to launch its iTunes Music Store in Australia, according to an online report.

The company has organized a press briefing for October 25th where it may finally unveil the store , Appletalk.com.au reported on its website earlier this week.

Top executives from Apple's iTunes and iPod divisions are expected to travel from the United States to speak at the briefing, which is being held in Sydney, Australia.

Speaking with CNet Australia, an Apple spokesperson confirmed the company had scheduled a "special" media briefing with two of its most senior United States-based executives on Tuesday the 25th.

Alongside the iTunes announcement, Apple is expected to present some original Australian video content recorded specifically for a small screen. The company is said to have approached music video producers to shoot and produce content for playback on the new fifth-generation video iPods.

If and when Apple's iTunes music and video download service finally makes its way to the Australian market, it will mark an end to a long struggle between Apple and the country's recording industry. In May, it was reported that an unsigned agreement with one major record company halted the launch of the store, which was originally expected to debut in April.

In late spring -- when iTunes Australia was in the final stages of testing -- some Mac users managed to gain access to a work-in-progress version of the store. At that time, the average price of a song was listed at $1.69 Australian. Album prices varied from $11.35 to $16.99.

Australia is one of the few remaining countries in which Apple operates but does not host an iTunes music store.
post #2 of 25
The poor people of Australia will just have to use allofmp3.com until iTunes launches, which costs a fraction of what iTunes does and often has a bigger selection. Aw.
post #3 of 25
And is apparently BOTH illegal and unethical

("Often" has a bigger selection? What makes it vary?)
post #4 of 25
Quote:
Originally posted by AppleInsider
...
At that time, the average price of a song was listed at $1.69 Australian. Album prices varied from $11.35 to $16.99.

Hum, the word that bothers me is "average". That means there are more than one price for the purchase of a single. Perhaps this is the future of my beloved 99 cents deal...
post #5 of 25
Quote:
Originally posted by nagromme
And is apparently BOTH illegal and unethical

("Often" has a bigger selection? What makes it vary?)

Not true. It is not illegal, unless you live in a country that does not allow you to purchase mail order music from overseas.

As far as unethical, the real question is: is it more unethical than the labels? Interesting question.
post #6 of 25
Quote:
Originally posted by Robin Hood
As far as unethical, the real question is: is it more unethical than the labels? Interesting question.

When someone uses the phrase "more unethical", what they really mean they don't give a damn about ethics. The 'question' is only interesting if you don't understand the meaning of the word "ethical".
post #7 of 25
So you're saying it is not up to consumers to question the ethics of companies they give money to, and therefore support?
post #8 of 25
Quote:
Originally posted by nagromme
And is apparently BOTH illegal and unethical

("Often" has a bigger selection? What makes it vary?)

"apparently ... unethical." Haha. Nice one.
post #9 of 25
Quote:
Originally posted by kmok1
Hum, the word that bothers me is "average". That means there are more than one price for the purchase of a single. Perhaps this is the future of my beloved 99 cents deal...

I don't think so. The sentence as it is doesn't really make sense:

Quote:
Originally posted by AppleInsider
the average price of a song was listed at $1.69

iTunes doesn't list songs' average price, just each individual price. Either this is meant to be: "the price of the songs listed was an average of $1.69" or "the price of an average song was $1.69".

Sorry AI, but there is a subtle difference...
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post #10 of 25
Quote:
Originally posted by nagromme
And is apparently BOTH illegal and unethical

("Often" has a bigger selection? What makes it vary?)

By the way, maybe rather than offering us the corporate-America propaganda you've been feed, you could read about it instead: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Allofmp3

That way you might grasp some understanding about it and realise that it's not as black and white as you think.
post #11 of 25
Quote:
Originally posted by danielctull
I don't think so. The sentence as it is doesn't really make sense:



iTunes doesn't list songs' average price, just each individual price. Either this is meant to be: "the price of the songs listed was an average of $1.69" or "the price of an average song was $1.69".

Sorry AI, but there is a subtle difference...

In Japan iTMS, songs are either 150 or 200 yens each. This could be the fate of all iTMSes...
post #12 of 25
Finally, im in Australia and this is much needed.. if it ever happens.
Would it really be worth living in a world without television - Krusty the Klown
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Would it really be worth living in a world without television - Krusty the Klown
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post #13 of 25
Yeah, I am waiting with abaited breath.
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post #14 of 25
I'm really hoping this takes off in Australia.

My biggest concern, however, is that the selection of music will be shit. And that it will be too expensive (if it really is $1.69 I think thats too high, but it's a start...). I haven't bought a CD for ages, but I'm pretty sure they are still way too expensive over here (a quick check looks like $26 - $30).

I also hope there are some decent music videos (I have quite a few all time favourite clips and they are impossible to get anywhere if you didn't at some stage record them off rage or whatever...) and I'd love to be able to dl them. Of course, they are far too obscure to end up on iTMS for now, but maybe one day!

I don't see iTMS ever replacing alternative sources of getting music, but the US store looks damn good, and I hope the Australian store gets a decent range of content too.
post #15 of 25
I am looking forward to the store. I haven't bought a cd in ages, purely because I listen to all my music through my comp out to speakers... I'm not one of those audiophile nuts who can hear the difference btween a cd and a downloaded track (a good download of course)...
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post #16 of 25
Yes, well, hopefully it's accessible New Zealand users or better still, we'll get our own. But I doubt it my .Mac sub still appears in Australian dollars, presumably because Apple doesn't have a division here and can't tell the difference between our accents...
post #17 of 25
NZ's store will come with the Australian store for sure as the same group does the licensing for both Australia and New Zealand. That said I doubt you'll get a separate store as Apple in New Zealand is run through Apple Australia isn't it?
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post #18 of 25
Quote:
Originally posted by Somynona
By the way, maybe rather than offering us the corporate-America propaganda you've been feed, you could read about it instead: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Allofmp3

That way you might grasp some understanding about it and realise that it's not as black and white as you think.

Your such a clown, and you are unethical. #1 wikipedia is not a 100% factual encyclopedia loaded with facts. It's mostly written by internet users. Notice the headline.

Welcome to Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia that anyone can edit.

It may not be illegal for russia's Allofmp3 to sell music, but they pay no one for it. You pay them, and that's where the money goes. No artist gets a cut. The record company does not deduct owed money from the artist contractual agreement, nor do they get royalties if their contract is paid off.
Because russia can't shut it down because of a loophole in russian law does not make it ethical for Allofmp3 to sell it, or for you to ignore the fact your just another thief stealing the works of others.
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post #19 of 25
Question: Are artists compensated for the downloads and how does this work in Russia?

Answer: We pay monthly deductions to ROMS. The distribution of the royalties to the authors fully depends on ROMS. ROMS (as well as RAO) distributes the royalties based on sales amount.

So it would seem artists are being compensated, though record companies don't get a cut (I believe artists have to register with ROMS directly to be compensated, if I understand how it works there... Feel feel to clarify how exactly ROMS and the RAO distribute compensation).
post #20 of 25
Monthly deductions to ROM's, as well as RAO. Oh that's Rich.
Quote:
The distribution of the royalties to the authors fully depends on ROMS

That looks more like a cute company to pay off with a nice name so everything looks like it's real.
I doubt The Russian Authors Society is paying anyone anything. Under the legal russian loophole that is letting this happen they don't have to.

Plus obviously ROMS isn't paying the Authors their due royalties per song downloaded. The Amount you pay for each song is likely less than a contractual deduction.

And you are people are claiming propaganda on our part. If you download from that site you are stealing music. That is all there is to it wake up, and stop lying to yourself. Your only fooling yourself.
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post #21 of 25
Quote:
Originally posted by onlooker
Monthly deductions to ROM's, as well as RAO. Oh that's Rich.

So in your opinion, they should not be paying monthly deducations to ROMS and RAO? I for one believe authors should be compensated. If that is not your opinion, fine.

Quote:
That looks more like a cute company to pay off with a nice name so everything looks like it's real.
I doubt The Russian Authors Society is paying anyone anything. Under the legal russian loophole that is letting this happen they don't have to.

You make it sound like ROMS and RAO are organisations created by Allofmp3 to hide behind. Get real, dude.

Quote:
Plus obviously ROMS isn't paying the Authors their due royalties per song downloaded. The Amount you pay for each song is likely less than a contractual deduction.

Seems like you know it all even before you check any facts.

Quote:
And you are people are claiming propaganda on our part. If you download from that site you are stealing music. That is all there is to it wake up, and stop lying to yourself. Your only fooling yourself.

I never claimed propaganda. As far as the law, when you download from allofmp3 you are NOT stealing music. That is the law.

As far as artists getting a smaller amount than if you had bought the CD, that is a different matter. But legally, downloading from allofmp3 is not stealing. There is nothing illegal about it.
post #22 of 25
By the way, I used to spend over $1000 a year purchasing CD's and DVD's. But since the recording industry clearly does not want my business anymore (selling crippled CD's that do not play in many devices, only selling me DRM-infected files online at exorbitant prices, going after children who downloaded 10 songs, the list goes on). Why should I force my business down their throats if they don't want it? I actually bought a bunch of songs through iTunes, but the DRM was too much hassle and provided lots of headaches listening to my own music. I don't blame Apple for this, they're forced to add the DRM.

And I've talked to artists. They're absolutely getting ripped off by the recording industry as well, having to sign all their rights over so it's locked up in some recording industry vault, with the record label taking most (in some cases all) of the profit.

I will continue to be happy to buy music from artists directly (just spent $30 on direct CD's the other day). But I refuse to give the recording industry more of my money than necessary until they mend their ways.

Edit: Check out http://music.podshow.com/ and the Accident Hash podcast in iTunes (search for Accident Hash). The thing the record labels are scared of is artists and consumers cutting out the middle man.
post #23 of 25
australians all let us rejoice...
for we are young and fr---


nah, let us rejoice for finally getting a bloody iTMS at last.


20/10/05
"Kathy McCabe writes in the Daily Telegraph this morning: "After waiting more than 12 months, hundreds of thousands of iPod owners will be able to access paid downloads from October 31.
An Apple media conference next Tuesday (25th) is expected to confirm the Australian store's launch and how much we will pay per song or album. Speculation has the cost per song being between 99c and $1.69."

At the same time, Cnet are calling the 25th as the launch date: "After more than a year of speculation and false starts, Apple is finally expected to launch the Australia iTunes Music Store on Tuesday, October 25, 2005." Cnet also reveal the location of the event. "The Apple event next week is taking place at the Siebel Pier One Hotel in Sydney's central business district."
post #24 of 25
I'd be surprised if the songs are below $1.49. Given the price of CDs in Australia $1.69 or $1.79 sounds more likely.
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post #25 of 25
Well it's now open.... songs are $1.69 and albums are $16.99

They went live without including any Sony BMG music... meaning negotiations are still ongoing.
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