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Jobs asks author: "Are you a nut case?" - Page 3

post #81 of 103
Again, I'm glad to answer your questions and, again, since no one here has read the article/chapter, why not save judgement until you have a chance to. And why not use your real name(s), unless you don't want to stand behind what you say or have to own up to it? Feel free to write me at SteveJobsBio {at} yahoo.com
post #82 of 103
Yeah, like we're going to believe you are Maxwell.
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post #83 of 103
Quote:
Originally posted by CosmoNut
Yeah, like we're going to believe you are Maxwell.

He is. I checked.
post #84 of 103
I do find Steve Jobs and also Steve Wozniak to be quite interesting. Mr. Jobs has had quite a few books written about him.

I would like to see some other folks be written about, who are in the Apple firmament. One character was Jef Raskin, who has had some notoriety, and who is no longer with us, yet who really got the Mac project going. Another is Bill Atkinson, a protege of Raskin's, who had a lot to do with the original Mac OS, as did Andy Hertzfeld, and Bud Tribble. Other fellows who had a lot to do with Apple in those days were Steve Capps, and Larry Tesler, and then there is another fellow who has been around, from Apple to Be to Palm and back to Apple, and that is Steve Sakoman.

How much has been written about any of these folks, just in the Mac universe, and there are many more. For me, it is erroneous to think that such bios would not sell. I would buy them.

And further abroad, William Hewlett and David Packard should have more air time, so to speak, or Alan Kay, or Ray Noorda. There is another interesting man.
post #85 of 103
Quote:
Originally posted by NordicMan
I do find Steve Jobs and also Steve Wozniak to be quite interesting. Mr. Jobs has had quite a few books written about him.

I would like to see some other folks be written about, who are in the Apple firmament. One character was Jef Raskin, who has had some notoriety, and who is no longer with us, yet who really got the Mac project going. Another is Bill Atkinson, a protege of Raskin's, who had a lot to do with the original Mac OS, as did Andy Hertzfeld, and Bud Tribble. Other fellows who had a lot to do with Apple in those days were Steve Capps, and Larry Tesler, and then there is another fellow who has been around, from Apple to Be to Palm and back to Apple, and that is Steve Sakoman.

How much has been written about any of these folks, just in the Mac universe, and there are many more. For me, it is erroneous to think that such bios would not sell. I would buy them.

And further abroad, William Hewlett and David Packard should have more air time, so to speak, or Alan Kay, or Ray Noorda. There is another interesting man.

Mr. H an Mr. P have had books written about the, I'm not sure about Noorda. He certainly was (and I believe still is) odd. I'm not sure if he died recently. He is pretty old.

Raskin and the others have been featured in quite a few books, but no tby themselves.

Maybe someone should write a book about them and leave Job and the Woz out of it.
post #86 of 103
Quote:
Originally posted by melgross
He is. I checked.

Checked what?
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post #87 of 103
Maybe he asked this guy?






My cut is this whole little publicity stunt is downright stupid. Publishing something as whacky as "Are you a nut case?" just smacks of desperation.
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post #88 of 103
How is Jobs "wrong"? He doesn't like people prying around in his most private life. It MAY be interesting, some day, to have a big, old-fashioned, Victorian-style 800-page biography of Jobs, but those things are usually posthumous. This is just smash and grab burglary.
post #89 of 103
Quote:
Originally posted by CosmoNut
Checked what?

The publisher and his e-mail.
post #90 of 103
Quote:
Originally posted by NordicMan
I do find Steve Jobs and also Steve Wozniak to be quite interesting. Mr. Jobs has had quite a few books written about him.

I would like to see some other folks be written about, who are in the Apple firmament. One character was Jef Raskin, who has had some notoriety, and who is no longer with us, yet who really got the Mac project going. Another is Bill Atkinson, a protege of Raskin's, who had a lot to do with the original Mac OS, as did Andy Hertzfeld, and Bud Tribble. Other fellows who had a lot to do with Apple in those days were Steve Capps, and Larry Tesler, and then there is another fellow who has been around, from Apple to Be to Palm and back to Apple, and that is Steve Sakoman.

How much has been written about any of these folks, just in the Mac universe, and there are many more. For me, it is erroneous to think that such bios would not sell. I would buy them.

And further abroad, William Hewlett and David Packard should have more air time, so to speak, or Alan Kay, or Ray Noorda. There is another interesting man.

I wrote about both Kay and Noorda in Bad Boy Ballmer, and Wendy Rohm wrote extensively about Noorda in The Microsoft File. By the way, in BBB it was Noorda who gave one of the best quotes, calling Bill Gates and Steve Ballmer "The Pearly Gates and The Em-ballmer: on sets you up for heaven, the other prepares you for the grave."

As far as the other folk you'd like to see book written about, feel free. Of course then, unlike most folk chatting here, you'd have to use your real name, and stand behind what you write.
post #91 of 103
Quote:
Originally posted by Hiro
Maybe he asked this guy?






My cut is this whole little publicity stunt is downright stupid. Publishing something as whacky as "Are you a nut case?" just smacks of desperation.

Nice to hear from you. You can find my picture online. And why not use your real name? Unless, of course, you work for Apple.
post #92 of 103
Quote:
Originally posted by Fredric Alan Maxwell
I wrote about both Kay and Noorda in Bad Boy Ballmer, and Wendy Rohm wrote extensively about Noorda in The Microsoft File. By the way, in BBB it was Noorda who gave one of the best quotes, calling Bill Gates and Steve Ballmer "The Pearly Gates and The Em-ballmer: on sets you up for heaven, the other prepares you for the grave."

As far as the other folk you'd like to see book written about, feel free. Of course then, unlike most folk chatting here, you'd have to use your real name, and stand behind what you write.

Not too interested in Ballmer. I read with interest Wendy Rohm's densely written book that you mention. Yes, Mr. Noorda had many good quotes, that one being quite notable. I think he is a quite principled man who sought to do his country good, as he felt that he had missed serving in the armed services. He wrote a poem about 'Pearly', as he liked to call Gates. I hold Noorda high in estimation, though I do not know him.

One living in a small town far away is scarcely in a position to write about such people, getting interviews would not be easy, and I am not in any tech industry. My business takes up my days from sun up to sundown.

When I have something to say publicly, then my name is on it, as it would be if I wrote a book, if anyone is in business, then you stand for what you think. You have quite a thing about everyone who converses on line having to use their own name. Not everyone wishes to use their own name on line. Of course, if it pertains to one's business, then you will use your name on line.
post #93 of 103
Quote:
Originally posted by Fredric Alan Maxwell
Nice to hear from you. You can find my picture online. And why not use your real name? Unless, of course, you work for Apple.

First off, I wasn't addressing you, nor even referring to you. I was addressing CosmoNut and the "source" melgross said he had. You now show everyone here a certain lack of attention to detail in what you read, showing your real world judgement is not infallible and is observed to actually be quite substantially off the mark. A really bad thing when you say you are writing autobiographies

Another thing, sidling up to the talking bar at a website and demanding things also shows a very poor sense of judgment. I don't go to your hang-outs and tell you and your friends to wear name badges, or what colot t-shirt to wear.

So now you go from me thinking you must be just some annoying publicity hound, to me thinking that maybe Steve had it right in the first place. Go ahead and dig yourself deeper, because at this point you can only loose potential readers.
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post #94 of 103
Lose, not loose Mr. Attention to Detail.
'L'enfer, c'est les autres' - JPS
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post #95 of 103
Quote:
Originally posted by Hiro
First off, I wasn't addressing you, nor even referring to you. I was addressing CosmoNut and the "source" melgross said he had. You now show everyone here a certain lack of attention to detail in what you read, showing your real world judgement is not infallible and is observed to actually be quite substantially off the mark. A really bad thing when you say you are writing autobiographies

Another thing, sidling up to the talking bar at a website and demanding things also shows a very poor sense of judgment. I don't go to your hang-outs and tell you and your friends to wear name badges, or what colot t-shirt to wear.

So now you go from me thinking you must be just some annoying publicity hound, to me thinking that maybe Steve had it right in the first place. Go ahead and dig yourself deeper, because at this point you can only loose potential readers.


Thank you for your permission, Mr. Hiro, to "dig [myself] deeper and deeper" and for your opinion of what this will do for me. I was waiting for that. And thank you as well, Mr. Hiro, for your opinion that I show "a certain lack of attention to detail in what [I] read" and that my "real world judgment is not infallible and is observed to be quite substantially off the mark." I think a mirror might be in order when you make that statement, Mr. Hiro, as I am melgross's "source," --exactly whom you were addressing. Keep looking in that mirror, Mr. Hiro, as you then go on to pontificate that this is "a really bad thing when [I] say [I am] writing autobiographies." I am not writing any "autobiographies," Mr. Hiro. Never said I was. But someday I might author one.

In fact, right now I'm spending allota time responding to people who don't have the guts to use their real names (though some of you have written me at my e-mail address [stevejobsbio {at} yahoo.com], using your real names and with some very insightful comments -- and a few Seve Jobs stories.) I'm just trying to correct the record, and do some research on what's happened when the word that I had the Jobs' Birth Father story came out. Much of it's pretty funny, actually.

And, of course, Apple monitors these sites -- might even have shills adding to the conversation -- so it's interesting to watch those who have taken such an interest in a failed attempt to discredit my work -- especially when they've never read it.

As I wrote the Apple Board of Directors, the sad thing about all this is that the book, Finding Steve Jobs, is such a positive look at Mr. Jobs, the artist who uses a technological canvas, yet it's the dark side of Mr. Jobs that certain people seem to want to concentrate on. I don't. And so I don't. Einstein is one of my heroes. Yet any quality biographer of the man has to at least mention that Mr. Albert was a terrible father and a horrible husband. We aren't his family so that matter too much to us. (I'd love, however, to find Einstein's illigitimate daughter) One person wrote me that he "doesn't care if [Steve Jobs is] Osama bin Laden's son, he makes great machines." But a biographer has to be concerned about such things. I could go on, but ... Enough said. Signed Fred.
post #96 of 103
Quote:
Originally posted by NordicMan
Not too interested in Ballmer. I read with interest Wendy Rohm's densely written book that you mention. Yes, Mr. Noorda had many good quotes, that one being quite notable. I think he is a quite principled man who sought to do his country good, as he felt that he had missed serving in the armed services. He wrote a poem about 'Pearly', as he liked to call Gates. I hold Noorda high in estimation, though I do not know him.

One living in a small town far away is scarcely in a position to write about such people, getting interviews would not be easy, and I am not in any tech industry. My business takes up my days from sun up to sundown.

When I have something to say publicly, then my name is on it, as it would be if I wrote a book, if anyone is in business, then you stand for what you think. You have quite a thing about everyone who converses on line having to use their own name. Not everyone wishes to use their own name on line. Of course, if it pertains to one's business, then you will use your name on line.

Thanks for the clairfication, Mr. NordicMan (is that redundant?) I conducted over 150 interviews with people on the Ballmer bio, most over the phone, several over the net, a few dozen in person, so you can do it from a small town.

Good to hear that you stand behind your words. Not so many do. Especially here.

Also, The Microsoft File was a must-read for me, as were a few dozen MSFT-related books. I really enjoyed David Kaplan's The Silicon Boys and their Valley of Dreams, not in a small part because I met him, and we had the same publisher and the same editor. Of course, I still find Steven Levy's Hackers the single best book on the creation of the personal computer industry, even though Tracy Kidder's The Soul of a New Machine won a Pultizer. Keep reading books -- Apple's making an assault on them in general, and the biographers of a certain subject in particular.
post #97 of 103










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post #98 of 103
Any news on the unauthorized biography of Steve Jobs by Fredric Alan Maxwell?
post #99 of 103
Quote:
Originally posted by Benton
Any news on the unauthorized biography of Steve Jobs by Fredric Alan Maxwell?

He gave me that chapter back then. I didn't think it would be a good idea to post it (it's too long for a post, among other things). But, there's nothing wrong with it. It is interesting.
post #100 of 103
Wow, what chutspah! Freddy love, you should go on being your sweet, groupie-esque, trolling self! To Hell with one's privacy, right?

I know that will be considered childish and immature, but it boils my blood to see people like you that feel the need to dig into people's lives and unearth their "skeletons." Leave the man alone. Just respect him for the successful innovator that he is.
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post #101 of 103
Quote:
Originally posted by Mac_Doll
Wow, what chutspah! Freddy love, you should go on being your sweet, groupie-esque, trolling self! To Hell with one's privacy, right?

I know that will be considered childish and immature, but it boils my blood to see people like you that feel the need to dig into people's lives and unearth their "skeletons." Leave the man alone. Just respect him for the successful innovator that he is.

Well, I have nothing for, or against, someone doing an unauthorised bio.

But, many of the most important bio's in history have been done that way. Once someone has become a public persona, they give up their rights to much of the privacy that you or I can claim.

Jobs is prickly, but no more so than other famous people who didn't want their bio's publicly aired. Or, who wanted to control just what was said, so that they would appear to be squeaky clean, when they were not.

I'm not sure how these issues can be worked out.

The fact that the Constitution itself allows this, says much as to the importance of getting true information out about those in society who have chosen to be leaders of one sort or another.

While it might seem to be trivial to write something that a Jobs might not like, it goes to the heart of our democracy to be able to find the flaws of those who control either the political, or economic wealth of the nation, and to be able to publish those flaws, even when minor, as it is in this case.

If, when Henry Ford was being lauded, way back then, he had chosen to run for president, as some had urged him to do, it would have been good to know how much of a virulent anti-semite he was. That was something that those in the upper business and political community knew, but was something the masses did not. His public image was very different.

Should a bio of him at the time have included that information, or, should he have been able to prevent that information from coming out?

Again, even though this article on Jobs is trivial, it exists within the same concept of freedom of the press, which, no doubt, you, and others, will be quick to defend otherwise.

Please think on that for a while before rushing to judgement.
post #102 of 103
Why oh why did this have to be resurrected? Couldn't it have just DIED?
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post #103 of 103
Quote:
Originally posted by Kickaha
Why oh why did this have to be resurrected? Couldn't it have just DIED?

There's nothing wrong with it. This is a matter of freedom of the press issues. That's has more significance then many of the other minor topics we have discussed to absurdity, such as whether Apple will be using stickers.

Now, that was an issue that never should have been brought up!
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