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iTunes video sales double as Apple preps new content partners

post #1 of 67
Thread Starter 
Despite the lack of a large video library, Apple's iTunes video sales have more than doubled since the company announced its 1 millionth video sale, according to one analyst.

The iPod maker is also reportedly planning a major update to its video services, including the addition of several new content partners, for a high-profile launch that could come as early as January.

In a research note released to clients earlier this morning, American Technology Research analyst Shaw Wu said his proprietary checks with industry sources indicate that iTunes video sales from music videos, ABCTV shows and Pixar short films continue to come in ahead of expectations.

"Apple disclosed that it sold 1 million videos on October 31, 2005," said Wu. "We are picking up indications that sales have more than doubled since then and that this strength is attracting attention from other content providers including NBC, CBS, and Fox eager to participate in this new market opportunity."

The analyst said he would not be surprised to see Apple announce new content partners over the next few quarters, perhaps as early as Steve Jobs' keynote at Macworld Expo during the second week of January.

In recent weeks, independent sources have begun to spread rumors that Apple is gearing up to add a slew of new video content to its service early next year. Rumors that Apple is working on a broadband video service have also been re-ignited and appear to coincide with similar reports that surfaced following Apple's hiring of Julia Miller in March.

Miller came to Apple from Microsoft, where she was responsible for the worldwide marketing and sales programs for Xbox Live, the world's first subscription-based broadband-only online gaming service. After coming to Apple, sources say Miller's position included the exploration of a video subscription service, either for a portable video player or a settop device.

"While it is still early, we believe Apple is in a decent position to build as strong of a position in digital video infrastructure as it has in MP3 players," Wu said. "Like music, we do not believe Apple will compete for profit in content as a reseller/marketer, instead giving the majority of the profit back to the content providers."

Instead, the analyst believes signing up more content partners will help the company drive more growth from its easy-to-use and tightly integrated hardware and software systems.
post #2 of 67
Yup, this goes back to what we were saying in the previous article.

I'm always talking this point to those on Ars who think that Apple is a loser in the video content wars.
post #3 of 67
I've only bought one video to see what it was like. I'm hoping they start offering a larger resolution.

Edit: Of course I only have 1 or 2 gigs left on my iBook half of my drive (30Gig) is iTunes. Apple's digital lifestyle is demanding bigger drives! arrgh
post #4 of 67
No worries there. Apparently, according to the ThinkSecret article, the content providers insist that their content never touch the users' hard drives. \

Nice if you have >=5 Mbps broadband.

The rest of the planet however...
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post #5 of 67
Quote:
Originally posted by sCreeD
No worries there. Apparently, according to the ThinkSecret article, the content providers insist that their content never touch the users' hard drives. \

Nice if you have >=5 Mbps broadband.

The rest of the planet however...

And that's why I think that Apple's way of doing things will do much better than the other services that are coming on line now.

Those are not much better than pay for view DVR's.
post #6 of 67
I've really been enjoying the iTunes videos. With class from 6:00-9:20 on Wednesday nights, its the only way I get to watch Lost.
post #7 of 67
Quote:
Originally posted by melgross
And that's why I think that Apple's way of doing things will do much better than the other services that are coming on line now.

Those are not much better than pay for view DVR's.

Ok, I'm confused now, the content has to "touch" the hard drive. Or else it won't work on the iPod.
post #8 of 67
I think this article today from Think Secret explains how Apple will own the living room. It also appears they've solved DRM/piracy issues as well.


Road to Expo: Apple's new media experience coming soon
By Ryan Katz, Senior Editor

December 2, 2005 - Apple is planning to unveil a robust new content distribution system in January at Macworld Expo alongside its revamped media-savvy Mac mini, Think Secret has learned. The new content system and related media deals, which will include feature-length content, expanded televisions offerings, and more, will further cement Apple's increasing lead in digital media delivery.



In an effort to appease media companies wary of the security of digital rights management technology, Apple's new technology will deliver content such that it never actually resides on the user's hard drive. Content purchased will be automatically made available on a user's iDisk, which Front Row 2.0 will tap into. When the user wishes to play the content, robust caching technology Apple previously received a patent for will serve it to the users computer as fast as their Internet connection can handle. The system will also likely support downloading the video content to supported iPods but at no time will it ever actually be stored on a computer's hard drive.

This method, which will be every bit as simple and straightforward for consumers as the iTunes Music Store is now, poses a number of advantages over Apple's current pay-once-download-once system, including saving users' hard drive space and essentially providing a secure back-up of everything purchased. iTunes Music Store customers at present are charged 99 cents every time they download a song, regardless of whether they already bought it, and must back-up purchases themselves. A customer who experiences data loss and loses purchased songs is effectively out of luck as far as Apple is concerned.

Some questions remain about the particulars of the system that sources have been unable to clarify, including how customers without a .Mac account will be handled and how Apple will market the system to laptop-toting road warriors. It also remains to be seen whether the iDisk tie-in will only apply to some content. Apple's current video offerings are downloaded directly to a computer's hard drive, for example. Additionally, it's unknown whether the content system will be marketed as a Mac mini-only feature, which is unlikely but possible if it is dependent upon technologies in that system, or whether it will be available to Mac and Windows users as a whole.

Alongside this announcement Apple will also be rolling out a number of new partnerships with various content providers. Those Apple has not signed at the time of launch, one source speculated, will likely want to jump on the bandwagon soon afterwards, not unlike the vast number of additional record labels that were added to the iTunes Music Store soon after its inception.

Once source explained that when Apple rolled out its video-capable iPod in October, limited contentfive TV shows, a few shorts, and music videoswas seen by executives as an acceptable amount to offer customers and watchers alike a glimpse of what was to come. WIth the roll-out of the new Mac mini, which sources continue to maintain will be bigger than anyone can imagine, Apple will blow the doors off legal video content delivery.

Many analysts agree both on the need for a service and Apple's ability to deliver one.

"I think there is clearly a need for someone to facilitate the digital distribution of content. When I'm looking at the TV and home entertainment sector it's very clear that all of this content is available illegally and too easily," Richard Greenfield, an independent media analyst told Think Secret. "There needs to be legal high quality ways to access content online, especially as your making more and more methods of transporting content around."

Greenfield added that with residential bandwidth speeds approaching if not exceeding 5-10Mbps in an increasing number of areas, online, on-demand video content will make more and more sense for consumers.

"The content creators need to give people legal, high-quality alternatives, or they are simply going to turn to piracy. This sounds like, on the surface, a viable answer to this issue for all concerned," he said.

Concerning the reborn Mac mini and Apple's media ambitions, Nitin Gupta, a technology consultant with the Yankee Group stressed the importance of widespread content.

"Initially, I'm concerned about the content and how much content Apple will be able to get," Gupta said. "How the rights work around digital distribution will play a big role. What content can Apple get that others don't already have exclusive use rights to movie channels for three, four, up to eight years?

"What will be the draw is access to great content they can't get elsewhere. Yes, this needs to includes movies and a lot more television shows, but it needs to include exclusive content. If it doesn't and it includes niche programming, like independent films, it's going to have limited appeal."

Analysts have heard rumblings that Apple is close to striking deals with NBC, CBS, and Paramount Pictures.

"It jives to a certain extent with what I'm expecting Apple to be able to do when Intel-based Macs arrive," said Rob Chira, computer hardware analyst at Fulcrum Global Partners. "I've always thought this Intel/Apple relationship was going to be much more than just chips in PCs. I think they're playing off of each others strengths and I wouldn't be surprised to see at least some part of this home entertainment/video content distribution model include some other technologies from Intel's Viiv project."

Viiv is the name of media center technologies Intel is developing ahead of the release of Microsoft Windows Vista, the major Windows upgrade formerly known as Longhorn and slated for delivery next year. Viiv PCs will include hardware specifically designed to optimize media management and playback, and will all ship with a special remote control from Intel along with the Media Center Edition of Windows Vista.

"I'm sure Apple doesn't want to do another version of the Windows Media Center PC," Chira said. "They want to one-up it, or ten-up it, as the case may be."
post #9 of 67
Quote:
Originally posted by DeaPeaJay
Ok, I'm confused now, the content has to "touch" the hard drive. Or else it won't work on the iPod.

What he meant by "touch" was that it can't be put onto your HD, only reside in the DVR.

If you can't put it onto your HD, then you can't scale and format it to work on your iPod. Quicktime Pro, and other programs allow you to "output to iPod", but only if the file is in the computer.
post #10 of 67
With current videos, it's resides on your Mac and gets synced with your iPod.

The alternative would be if you want to load a video to your iPod it would have to be downloaded from Apple headquarters (or a caching server elsewhere) every time. Again, doable if you have the bandwidth.

But that's a 320x240 video. If Apple's TiVo-killer is true then we're talking about HD quality (and size) content.

...but then the streaming function of Quicktime is fairly good...
...and yet that would be a marked departure of Apple's push for customers to own their music.
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post #11 of 67
What's Apple offering that I won't have the ability to get on VoD?
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post #12 of 67
Quote:
Originally posted by solsun

In an effort to appease media companies wary of the security of digital rights management technology, Apple's new technology will deliver content such that it never actually resides on the user's hard drive. Content purchased will be automatically made available on a user's iDisk, which Front Row 2.0 will tap into. When the user wishes to play the content, robust caching technology Apple previously received a patent for will serve it to the users computer as fast as their Internet connection can handle. The system will also likely support downloading the video content to supported iPods but at no time will it ever actually be stored on a computer's hard drive.

This method, which will be every bit as simple and straightforward for consumers as the iTunes Music Store is now, poses a number of advantages over Apple's current pay-once-download-once system, including saving users' hard drive space and essentially providing a secure back-up of everything purchased. iTunes Music Store customers at present are charged 99 cents every time they download a song, regardless of whether they already bought it, and must back-up purchases themselves. A customer who experiences data loss and loses purchased songs is effectively out of luck as far as Apple is concerned.

Some questions remain about the particulars of the system that sources have been unable to clarify, including how customers without a .Mac account will be handled and how Apple will market the system to laptop-toting road warriors. It also remains to be seen whether the iDisk tie-in will only apply to some content. Apple's current video offerings are downloaded directly to a computer's hard drive, for example. Additionally, it's unknown whether the content system will be marketed as a Mac mini-only feature, which is unlikely but possible if it is dependent upon technologies in that system, or whether it will be available to Mac and Windows users as a whole.

I think that this idea has too many problems for it to be viable right now.

If this content is going onto the iPod, it's still a seperate file, the way it is now.

This doesn't sound Apple-like at all.
post #13 of 67
Hmm. If I pay for something like music or videos, I want access to them even when I'm not connected to the net or my iDisk.
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post #14 of 67
I'm guessing what might actually happen is that it WILL reside on your hard drive, but not exactly. The way the iDisk works in Tiger is that is has an encrypted local copy, to speed up syncing. They will probably make it so those Video/Music folders cannot be edited in ANY way. This would make the most sense to me. Streaming high-bandwidth video/music everytime you want to watch or listen, makes no sense...too expensive in bandwidth and unuser friendly (anti-apple). It will probably act similar to subscription based services from Napster etc. except that you don't have to pay monthly fees, you just have to sync your ipod once a month or your videos will become unwatchable...iTunes music DRM will most likely not change, other than having the ability to download your songs anytime you want from your iDisk...that would be nice. They need to add more value to the iDisk, right now it sux, unless you use every feature.
post #15 of 67
Quote:
Originally posted by CosmoNut
Hmm. If I pay for something like music or videos, I want access to them even when I'm not connected to the net or my iDisk.

exactly. if you have to have access to your iDisk storage, and the storage requires a .mac membership fee every year, then we're talking about double-dipping costs (charge for the membership, then charge again for the media, and, in the end, you never actually have it in your hands). but this just does not sound like something steve would think would fly. i mean, you don't have to have a .mac membership to purchase off the itunes music store, just an apple subscribed ID. and if they really are selling the paltry amount of video content hand-over-fist ALREADY, why tinker with something that works? who knows, though? this may be the only way the other major companies would come on board, but i guess we'll just have to wait and see.

i would at LEAST like the ability to archive directly to a dvd through idvd or something if i want, though, and have the disk space and bandwidth to spare.

*just as an aside, do you think there will ever be another ceo crazy enough to turn down potentially enormous amounts of money to go with his/her vision like steve does? i mean, the 90's were littered with apple ceo's that steered the ship based solely upon flavor-of-the-day ideas, and never having that "vision thing" and the cojones to stick with said-vision, despite everyone saying not to. that's not to say steve's always right (e.g. missing the boat on seeing the importance of recordable CD's, the cube's form over function and price, etc.), but he's done way more things right that, at the outset, we all thought he was stark raving mad. anyway, i'm just sayin'...
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post #16 of 67
Quote:
Originally posted by rok
exactly. if you have to have access to your iDisk storage, and the storage requires a .mac membership fee every year, then we're talking about double-dipping costs (charge for the membership, then charge again for the media, and, in the end, you never actually have it in your hands).

Yeah...if true it is a subscription service. Nothing less. Which is all well and fine. Maybe that works out better.

We still have much to learn. Like, well, you know, whether this is even true.

post #17 of 67
No I don't think the file will ever reside on the hard drive at all...

"...Content purchased will be automatically made available on a user's iDisk, which Front Row 2.0 will tap into. When the user wishes to play the content, robust caching technology Apple previously received a patent for will serve it to the users computer as fast as their Internet connection can handle. The system will also likely support downloading the video content to supported iPods but at no time will it ever actually be stored on a computer's hard drive."


Sounds to me like a new faster caching system? As far as backing up the media to DVD, well, I don't think so... As it is right now, video purchased from iTunes can't be burned to DVD so nothing is changing in that regard.. Of course there are always ways around DRM, but this sounds like a pretty viable solution. You can put it on your iPod or watch it anythime you want via FrontRow, but you will never get the physical file in a way which it can be copied...

How is it different than Video on demand? Well, if Jobs can eventually bring all the major studios on board this could begin competing with Blockbuster and Hollywood Video. Who is gonna want to go drive and rent a movie when you can get any movie old or new instantly streamed to any tv in your house. Better yet, you can take it with you on your iPod!
post #18 of 67
Quote:
Originally posted by solsun
As it is right now, video purchased from iTunes can't be backed up

Say again?

I know you cannot burn to DVD (as a DVD...video)...but it seems to me that "bits are bits"...and backing up should work.

Am I wrong on this?
post #19 of 67
Call me when:
A: the quality doesnt stink
B: I can copy the shows to VCD or multiple shows to DVD or SVCD for archival and playback on (gasp) non-apple hardware/software
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post #20 of 67
Quote:
Originally posted by Chris Cuilla
Say again?

I know you cannot burn to DVD (as a DVD...video)...but it seems to me that "bits are bits"...and backing up should work.

Am I wrong on this?

pretty sure I just fomatted my HD the other nigth after backing up my entire iTunes library to DVDs...they seem to be working just fine...
post #21 of 67
Quote:
Originally posted by Chris Cuilla
Say again?

I know you cannot burn to DVD (as a DVD...video)...but it seems to me that "bits are bits"...and backing up should work.

Am I wrong on this?

you posted before while I was editing my post. I meant can't be burned!
post #22 of 67
Thanks for the clarification guys.

BTW...though I don't have new video iPod, I am thinking of "treating myself" to a couple of (U2) videos I have been wanting. How is the playback quality on a 20" iMac?
post #23 of 67
Quote:
Originally posted by a_greer
Call me when:
A: the quality doesnt stink
B: I can copy the shows to VCD or multiple shows to DVD or SVCD for archival and playback on (gasp) non-apple hardware/software

A. I too would hope with a new "Patented caching system" the streaming quality will be better than the current 320x240.

B. Non- Apple hardware? don't count on it.. Apple won't be making money on content (movie) distribution. If they actually do this, it will be to sell Apple hardware. As the article says the new Mac Mini with front row.

I also don't think this method of selling movies will be for PC users because of the whole streaming from iDisk thing. This may be an attempt to lure windows users over to the new intel macs.
post #24 of 67
Quote:
Originally posted by solsun
I also don't think this method of selling movies will be for PC users because of the whole streaming from iDisk thing. This may be an attempt to lure windows users over to the new intel macs.

Don't be so sure. You need to think less in terms of "PC" and more in terms of a "device that happens to contain PC technology like a CPU, memory, hard drive and OS but isn't really a PC".

Close to half of Apple's revenues now come from the iPod.
post #25 of 67
Quote:
Originally posted by solsun
I also don't think this method of selling movies will be for PC users because of the whole streaming from iDisk thing. This may be an attempt to lure windows users over to the new intel macs.

Yeah, Apple will want to sell more Macs, but isn't there a Windows utility to access your iDisk? I remember using something like that back when I first converted. (Wow. That really sounds religious. )
post #26 of 67
Quote:
Originally posted by bikertwin
Yeah, Apple will want to sell more Macs, but isn't there a Windows utility to access your iDisk? I remember using something like that back when I first converted. (Wow. That really sounds religious. )

Yes there is an iDisk utility for windows, but it there is no Front Row for windows.

I personally believe that this will be a way to sell the new Intel based Mac Mini media computer with front row that by the way will also dual-boot into Windows.
post #27 of 67
Quote:
Originally posted by solsun
I think this article today from Think Secret explains how Apple will own the living room. It also appears they've solved DRM/piracy issues as well.


Road to Expo: Apple's new media experience coming soon
By Ryan Katz, Senior Editor

December 2, 2005 - Apple is planning to unveil a robust new content distribution system in January at Macworld Expo alongside its revamped media-savvy Mac mini, Think Secret has learned...


Copyright issues


AppleInsider editors should not allow junior members to quote at length the full content of articles published elsewhere, even if acknowledging the source of the article.

To refer to the full content of what is published elsewhere, it is better to give the title and url reference of the article.

In this case, "Road to Expo: Apple's new media experience coming soon", should have been followed by the url:

http://www.thinksecret.com/news/0511contentdist.html


ThinkSecret lives off publicity and the number of people clicking on the article matters. That's why it's not enough to acknowledge the source of the article.

While there is an exception to copyright rules for the academic use and discussion of published materials, it applies only to quoting select excerpts, limited portions of published materials, not quoting at length the full content of what is published elsewhere.

The problem here is compounded by the fact that a junior member cannot correct his post once it has been published online for one or two hours.

Clearly, this is a matter for the editors who should correct the post by shortening the quote, cutting everything after the first paragraph taken from ThinkSecret, and giving the url reference.

I don't want to blame the junior member who is not a corporate and business lawyer, but the editors should act as soon as they become aware of the problem.



Pierre
post #28 of 67
The Think Secret plan sounds too convoluted.
I agree with Mel Gross its very unApple.

Maybe this is backlash for all of the press and prasie Apple has recieved, but I'm a bit confused by all who are so critical of iTunes video.

This all has to be kept in perspective. This is a first step. Apple is trying something entirely new and dealing with an industry that is afraid.

320X240 isn't great but when you see it isn't that bad. I wonder how many people have actually seen the video clips before they criticize.

This resolution is a compromise between quality and real life data speeds. Once most of the general public has payed money for their video they will want it now, few people would tolerate waiting hours to download an HD show. Well except people who spend lots of time in their mother's basement on the internet and playing video games. But the vast majority of people have live's and little time to wait.

The other complaint is the video DRM. Which is also a comprimise. No content provider would agree to sign up if their was no DRM. No content provider will agree to sell a perfect digital copy of its product and give every user the ability to record and store it any way they desire.

This has little to do directly with Apple and everything to do with multibillion dollar conglometares and their stock holders.
post #29 of 67
The iDisk utility for Windoze just barely works. Apparently it will not work at all under some configurations, so Apple has alternate instructions for this case. The proceedure involves creating a 'Network Place' and does not involve any addional utility. I gave this a try after flaky results with the util. The util, while flaky, ended up working much better.

I guess the Windoze version of iTunes would have to handle the connection to the iDisk itself to have any chance for reliablity. But now we're talking about marketing .Mac to users of Windoze, which makes no sense.
post #30 of 67
Quote:
Originally posted by funkfeend
The iDisk utility for Windoze just barely works. Apparently it will not work at all under some configurations, so Apple has alternate instructions for this case. The proceedure involves creating a 'Network Place' and does not involve any addional utility. I gave this a try after flaky results with the util. The util, while flaky, ended up working much better.

I guess the Windoze version of iTunes would have to handle the connection to the iDisk itself to have any chance for reliablity. But now we're talking about marketing .Mac to users of Windoze, which makes no sense.

But it would be cool!
post #31 of 67
Quote:
Originally posted by funkfeend
The iDisk utility for Windoze just barely works. Apparently it will not work at all under some configurations, so Apple has alternate instructions for this case. The proceedure involves creating a 'Network Place' and does not involve any addional utility. I gave this a try after flaky results with the util. The util, while flaky, ended up working much better.

I guess the Windoze version of iTunes would have to handle the connection to the iDisk itself to have any chance for reliablity. But now we're talking about marketing .Mac to users of Windoze, which makes no sense.

The article says an iDisk is required, not a .mac account.

Could be a free basic iDisk strictly for viewing iTunes video content.
post #32 of 67
IF the thinksecret story is right, there's no way its going to be full HD.
Or even 720p.
it's going to be 420p.

Try downloading a HD trailer from Apple.com at 420p and 720p. look at the file sizes.

And more importantly, look which one streams instantly. As others in Macrumors have mentioned - Front Row trailers stream instantly and fully: they can be 'fast-forwarded' no problems. You can scroll thorugh an entire trailer...no waiting....(on my not-so-special cable connection)

I'm not sure what resolution those are...but the same can be done with the HD 420p trailers at Apple.com (throw it to full screen, and start fastforwarding with QT7s new onscreen controls...hmm.....)

As for "I WANT 720p because it looks so so much better...."

Below are two images of DETAIL from a trailer...one 720p one 420p.. (increased sized the 420p in quicktime)

first...a Full frame reference JPEG of the trailer:


720p


420p



So you can tell the difference..and I would demand 720p.....except when BOTH are scaled up to full screen.


Portion of frame as displayed in full screen..meaning actual pixels you see (@ 1920*1200)

720p


420p



There is a difference, but not much. And you have to remeber that the head shot here is jsut a small portion of the whole frame

I'm moderatley happy with the "DVD quality" of 420p.....which is what we'll hear it is. But I don't want to pay tons for it either!
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post #33 of 67
Quote:
Originally posted by solsun
The article says an iDisk is required, not a .mac account.

Could be a free basic iDisk strictly for viewing iTunes video content.

i can't see how they could do that. i mean, lots of people streaming content... someone's gotta pay for that bandwidth somewhere.
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post #34 of 67
Quote:
Originally posted by ouragan
I don't want to blame the junior member who is not a corporate and business lawyer,...

I think I know someone who claims to be, though.

Lighten up, sue, or go away.
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post #35 of 67
This is a complicated issue. It won't be resoved here.

But first of all, it's poor practice to compare the quality of video streams using a freeze frame from either.

Frozen frames always exhibit more artifacts than streaming frames do.

When I rez a DVD up to 1920 to 1080p om my Mac to my Sony 24" CRT display, people think it is hi def.

I don't know what Apple will do, but broadband issues are going to be at the top of the talking point list.

I wouldn't mind broadcast standard 720 x 480 files. The same as DVD.

Don't forget that the average tv only has about 350 x 480 real resolution. Better sets get the horizontal up to 450, and a few do better. Only LCD, plasma, LoCos, and DLP.

Fact is, 85% of all tv's sold this past year were crt based, and there won't be that much of a change in the coming year either.

Apple has to appeal to those with slower connections, who don't have, or care about hi end video.
post #36 of 67
Quote:
Originally posted by rok
i can't see how they could do that. i mean, lots of people streaming content... someone's gotta pay for that bandwidth somewhere.

Yes, that's a very good point.
post #37 of 67
Quote:
Originally posted by melgross
This is a complicated issue. It won't be resoved here.

But first of all, it's poor practice to compare the quality of video streams using a freeze frame from either.

Frozen frames always exhibit more artifacts than streaming frames do.

...

Don't forget that the average tv only has about 350 x 480 real resolution. Better sets get the horizontal up to 450, and a few do better. Only LCD, plasma, LoCos, and DLP.

Fact is, 85% of all tv's sold this past year were crt based, and there won't be that much of a change in the coming year either.

Apple has to appeal to those with slower connections, who don't have, or care about hi end video.


Good point on the freeze frame, agreed.

However, some CRTs are capable of amazing picture resolution. Sony's 34" wide screen does full 1080i for example. With the tube, not down scaled or something. If you pay $200 for TV sure, but CRts that do 720 and 1080 go for around $500 and $1400 respectivly don't they?

I personally think CRT is cabable of the best picture quality (NO ghosting, view angle etc) - unless you start spending $10K+ on plasmas. Although my Sony also wieghs in at 200lbs.......
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post #38 of 67
Quote:
Originally posted by ouragan
Copyright issues

Wow, that sure was a verbosely serious version of what I was gonna suggest:

It would have been enough just to post the article title/link and let ThinkSecret collect their page hits.

post #39 of 67
Quote:
Originally posted by ouragan
Copyright issues


AppleInsider editors should not allow junior members...
Pierre


Maybe the "junior member" got permission and maybe he is a law breaker.

Either way, I can't for the life of me understand why you think newer members are subject to certain rules and imply the rest of us are not.
Hard-Core.
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Hard-Core.
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post #40 of 67
Not to be a nitpicker... but this sentence, "...his proprietary checks with industry sources...", should probably read, "...his checks with proprietary industry sources...", since his process of checking is unlikely to be proprietary.

Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

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Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

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