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Intel to ship 45-nanometer chips in 2007

post #1 of 57
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Intel in the second half of 2007 will begin commercial shipments of the first PC processors based on a 45 nanometer (nm) manufacturing process, the company said this week.

On Wednesday the company demonstrated what is says is the first fully functional SRAM (Static Random Access Memory) chips using 45nm process technology, its next generation, highvolume semiconductor manufacturing process. According to a company statement, the chip has more than 1 billion transistors.

Though not intended as an Intel product, the SRAM chip demonstrates technology performance, process yield and chip reliability prior to ramping processors and other logic chips using the 45nm manufacturing process. "It is a key first step in the march toward highvolume manufacturing of the worlds most complex devices," the company said.

Achieving this milestone means Intel is on track to manufacture chips with this technology in 2007 using 300mm wafers, and continues the companys focus on pushing the limits of Moores Law, by introducing a new process generation every two years.

Today, Intel leads the industry in volume production of semiconductors using 65nm process technology, with two manufacturing facilities making 65nm chips in Arizona and Oregon and two more coming online this year in Ireland and Oregon.

"Being first to high volume with 65nm process technology and the first with a working 45nm chip highlights Intels leadership position in chip technology and manufacturing," said Bill Holt, vice president, general manger, Intel Technology and Manufacturing Group. "Intel has a long history of translating technology leaps into tangible benefits that people appreciate. Our 45nm technology will provide the foundation for delivering PCs with improved performanceper watt that will enhance the user experience.

Intels 45nm process technology will allow chips with more than five times less leakage power than those made today, the company said. This will improve battery life for mobile devices and increase opportunities for building smaller, more powerful platforms.

In addition to the manufacturing capabilities of its D1D facility in Oregon, where the initial 45nm development efforts are underway, Intel has also announced two highvolume fabs under construction to manufacture chips using the 45nm process technology: Fab 32 in Arizona and Fab 28 in Israel.
post #2 of 57
Evidence of the Intel roadmap coming to fruition. Jobs must be rubbing his hands together so hard he's setting his fingernails on fire.

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post #3 of 57
Is it much harder to translate directly to 32 nm, or is this just a case of making more money by slowing development down?
post #4 of 57
Quote:
Originally posted by Zandros
Is it much harder to translate directly to 32 nm, or is this just a case of making more money by slowing development down?

Are you kidding? Trolling maybe?
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post #5 of 57
Quote:
Originally posted by Zandros
Is it much harder to translate directly to 32 nm, or is this just a case of making more money by slowing development down?

Every step towards 0.01 nm is just Intel trying to make more money...




















to invest in the quest to deliver 0.01 nm chips.
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post #6 of 57
Quote:
Originally posted by onlooker
Are you kidding? Trolling maybe?

What? Now, do not accuse me of that.

It was a serious question. I understand that the development of new gate lengths cost money, but I wanted to know if it was significantly more expensive to directly translate to 32nm rather than 45nm. Because it is possible, right? Or do I misunderstand your reaction?
post #7 of 57
I think the surprise just came from how difficult it has been for companies to get to 65nm. That makes it surprising to think they can easily skip to 32. (I don't think they can.)

Anyway, this is a good reminder that there's ALWAYS something better coming. Whatever cool thing is on the horizon, if you wait and buy it, there will be something else on the horizon already.
post #8 of 57
Quote:
Originally posted by nagromme
I think the surprise just came from how difficult it has been for companies to get to 65nm. That makes it surprising to think they can easily skip to 32. (I don't think they can.)

Anyway, this is a good reminder that there's ALWAYS something better coming. Whatever cool thing is on the horizon, if you wait and buy it, there will be something else on the horizon already.

this is why you should only upgrade when you REALLy need to.
post #9 of 57
Quote:
Originally posted by Zandros
What? Now, do not accuse me of that.

It was a serious question. I understand that the development of new gate lengths cost money, but I wanted to know if it was significantly more expensive to directly translate to 32nm rather than 45nm. Because it is possible, right? Or do I misunderstand your reaction?

Die shrinks create require navigating a thicket of problems, from design and material processes to outfitting fabs and getting reasonable (profitable) yields. All of it is fraught with peril and very expensive.

Chip manufacturers use the lessons learned and the infrastructure build-out at each level to facilitate the transition to the next. Trying to jump a level is just as likely and doable as abruptly doubling the clock speed of your CPU offerings.
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post #10 of 57
Intel seems to be doing better with the 65nm process than they did with 90nm.

A good sign.

Of course, Intel does seem to be having some chip shortages at present. Of course, everyone making laptops probably wants the Duo's so the demand is pretty high.
post #11 of 57
Why are Fabs located in Israel? Is that a second silicon valley, or great tax advantages, or just coincidence?
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post #12 of 57
Quote:
Originally posted by aplnub
Why are Fabs located in Israel? Is that a second silicon valley, or great tax advantages, or just coincidence?

Probably a combination of a lot of scientists/engineers, tax cuts and a welcoming public all in one place.
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post #13 of 57
Quote:
Originally posted by aplnub
Why are Fabs located in Israel? Is that a second silicon valley, or great tax advantages, or just coincidence?

So we can have funny names for our processors, like Yonah and Merom. I'm hoping for a quad-core 45 nm Yitzhak.
post #14 of 57
Quote:
Originally posted by BRussell
So we can have funny names for our processors, like Yonah and Merom. I'm hoping for a quad-core 45 nm Yitzhak.

All part of the long march to the .01 nm Bupkis.
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post #15 of 57
Quote:
Originally posted by aplnub
Why are Fabs located in Israel? Is that a second silicon valley, or great tax advantages, or just coincidence?

The Pentium M core, on which Core Solo/Duo are heavily based, was designed by Intel's Israel design center. I'm not sure if the Fab preceded the design center, or was a thank-you for them saving Intel's bacon from the P4 fires.
post #16 of 57
Quote:
Originally posted by aplnub
Why are Fabs located in Israel? Is that a second silicon valley, or great tax advantages, or just coincidence?

Intel has actually been doing business in Israel for a long time. I think their first overseas fab was Fab 8 in Jerusalem. Israel is a very high-tech country and it's especially strong in computer science (RSA and PHP come out of Israel for example). It has the highest ratio of engineers per capita in the world so there's tremendous talent and the government is really eager to attract foreign investment because the economy has been depressed because of the conflict. I think they gave Intel $5+ billion in tax breaks to build the new fab.
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post #17 of 57
Will this new 45-nanometer chip make the MacBook Pro (with Merom) in September 2006 obsolete, because I am waiting for 2nd revision macbook pro with merom and because I dont want rev A. and because I can wait till Sept. but I cant wait for 2007. I am planing on keeping this computer for 3-4 years.
post #18 of 57
Quote:
Originally posted by ukieboarder
Will this new 45-nanometer chip make the MacBook Pro (with Merom) in September 2006 obsolete, because I am waiting for 2nd revision macbook pro with merom and because I dont want rev A. and because I can wait till Sept. but I cant wait for 2007. I am planing on keeping this computer for 3-4 years.

Intel is back to pushing Moore's law to the limits, so with Apple along with the flow of course the 45nm chips will make the MBP rev.B obsolete. But if you wait and wait, you'll never get one. I'm waiting for the rev.B to come out, because more 3rd party programs will be universal.
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post #19 of 57
So you think Apple will announce Merom Books at Paris? I'm going abroad to Japan at end of August, and I'll need a laptop. Or do you guys think I could get one for about the same price in Japan?
post #20 of 57
Intel Pentium 960 (Presler) is expected to be released in Q2. Based on the Presler core, this CPU is expected to be released at a clock speed of 3.6Ghz.

Intel Sossaman CPU is expected to be released in H1 2006. Sossaman is the Xeon processor based around a 65nm Yonah core. Sossaman is a low power processor, with the 2Ghz revision having a TDP of 31W, with the 1.67Ghz LV version having a TDP of just 15W.

Intel Celeron M 4xx (Yonah) series is expected to be released in Q2. The Celeron M 4xx series is based on a single core version of Yonah featuring 1MB L2 cache, a 533FSB, and no EIST support.

Intel 945GMS chipset for Yonah is expected to be released in Q2. Based on the Calistoga chipsets, the 945GMS will feature a 667Mhz FSB, and single channel DDR2-533 memory interface.

Intel 940GML chipset for Yonah is expected to be released in Q2. Based on the Calistoga chipsets, the 940GML will feature a 533Mhz FSB, and single channel DDR2-400 memory interface.

Intel E7520 (Blackford) chipset for Dempsey, forming the Bensley platform, is expected to be released in Mid 2005. Blackford features dual independent front side busses, allowing 17GB/s of bandwidth between the two cores, and a quad channel FB-DIMM memory controller supporting up to 64GB of memory. This chipset is also expected to feature support for a 1066Mhz FSB speed, Intel's I/O acceleration, Intel Virtualisation Technology (formally Vanderpool) Intel Active Management technology and PCI Express

Intel Merom Mobile processor, the successor to Jonah and part of the Santa Rosa platform, is expected to be released in September on a 65nm process. Merom is a Dual Core CPU combining the architecture of NetBurst and the Pentium-M to achieve both high performance and lower power consumption. Merom utilises the FSB and EM64T of NetBurst, but is largely based around the Pentium M architecture. The CPU is a 4-issue design (compared to the 3 issue cores of the Athlon 64 and Pentium 4 architectures) with a 14 stage pipeline - significantly shorter than that of NetBurst CPUs (from 20 in Willamette to 31 stages in Prescott). The shorter pipeline will ensure that Merom and it's derivatives will not clock as high as Precott, but it will likely clock as fast or faster than the Athlon 64 - i.e. around 3Ghz. However, the IPC of Merom is likely to be better than the Athlon 64 due to it's 4 issue superscalar design and vastly better than the P4.
Merom will feature 4MB of L2 cache shared between the two cores and will feature a direct L1 to L1 cache transfer system between the L1 caches of each of the cores to improve performance. Merom will also feature a number of enhances prefectching schemes to enhance the use of the caches. Merom is expected to launch at a clock speed of 2.33Ghz.

Intel Crestine-GM (Crestline?) chipset for Merom is expected to be released in Q3. Crestine-GM is part of the Santa Rosa platform and is expected to support an 800Mhz FSB speed, DDRII 800 SDRAM and PCI Express. Crestine is expected to interface to ICH8-M, featuring support for Serial ATA 300, and the Golan2 / Annadel wireless chipset supporting 80211a/b/g and 11n WiMax.

Intel Xeon DP (Woodcrest) processor is expected to be released in H2. Woodcrest is the successor to Dempsey, but is based on the Conroe core. Woodcrest is expected to have 8MB of L2 cache and feature Intel's Dual Independent Bus system. The Processor Side Bus for Woodcrest is expected to be clocked at 1333Mhz.

Intel Millville desktop CPU is expected to be released in Q1 2007. Millville is expected to be a single core version of Allendale, containing 1MB of L2 cache.

Intel Kentsfield desktop CPU is expected to be released in Early-Mid 2007. Kentsfield is expected to be a quad core CPU contained in a multi-chip package (i.e. 2 Dual Core CPUs in a single package). Kenstfield is expected to feature 4MB of L2 cache.

Intel Stealey mobile CPU is expected to be released in Mid 2007. Stealey is expected to be a single core budget CPU featuring 512KB of L2 cache.

Intel Penryn mobile CPU is expected to be released in H2 2007 on a 45nm process. Penryn is the successor to Merom / Gilo and is expected to be a dual core CPU based on a 45nm process and containing either 3MB or 6MB of L2 cache.

Intel Yorkfield desktop CPU is expected to be released around 2009. Yorkfield is expected to be based on a 45nm process and contain 8 CPU cores in a multi die package. Yorkfield is also expected to contain 12MB of shared L2 and may comprise of 4xWolfdale chips in a single package.

Intel 32nm process is expected to come online in 2009.

Intel 22nm process is expected to come online in 2011.
post #21 of 57
Quad Cores and 4Ghz! with 8MB L2 Cache!

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post #22 of 57
I'm not so concerned with clock as I am with cores. I think an Itanium core is about 25 million transistors. So a 16 core Itanium with 32MB of on chip cache seems like it could happen. Sweet.
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post #23 of 57
more and more options for MacPros and MacServes

do any one see Itaniums will be in XServe, that will be one hell of a server!

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post #24 of 57
Quote:
Originally posted by Zandros
Is it much harder to translate directly to 32 nm, or is this just a case of making more money by slowing development down?

It's much harder, doubly as expensive, and takes twice as long to develop.

Moore's so-called 2nd law for CMOS fabs is that the cost to develop them doubles every node. And remember that the so-called 1st law is that chip density doubles every node, with each node advance occuring every 18-24 months.

It is purely an economic equation. Essentially, in order to recoup the cost of developing a next generation fab, that fab has to sell twice as many chips over the lifespan of the fab. If the market can't support that, then there is no point in developing the fab.

Keep in mind that Intel is shipping 65 nm CPUs right now. Everyone else is 6 months behind them. Poor Freescale is a full node behind Intel. AMD won't be shipping until 2H 06. IBM likely in 2H 06 as well. Freescale won't have a 65 nm fab, but will share one like they are now with the 90 nm fab, which incidently, we haven't seen the fruits yet. They won't be jumping any node advances because it costs too much, takes too much time and don't have the market to support such a development.

The cost of developing a 65 nm? Probably $3 to $5 billion. The cost of developing a 45 nm? Probably $5 to $10 billion. The cost of moving directly from 65 nm to 32 nm? Probably $15 billion, 4+ years, and in the meanwhile, the 65 nm chip performance will stagnate for 2 years, leaving you at a horrible performance and market disadvantage for those two years. No company can survive that.

The other problem? AMD's 2005 revenue was about $5.5 billion. Intel's 2005 revenue was about $33 billion. This is why Intel is always first to the next nodes. They have the money and the market to get there while other companies have to extend the life cycles of their fabs, must form investment collaborations, and have no choice but to fall behind.
post #25 of 57
Quote:
Originally posted by Splinemodel
I'm not so concerned with clock as I am with cores. I think an Itanium core is about 25 million transistors. So a 16 core Itanium with 32MB of on chip cache seems like it could happen. Sweet.

Itanium needs more cache. So it would be more like 4 cores with 48 MB of cache. A 3 billion transistor chip. If Intel can ship Montecito, a dual-core 2-way MT Itanium chip with 24 MB L3 in Summer of 2006, then I'd have more confidence in Intel shipping a 4 core 2-way MT Itanium chip in 2007, but who knows.

Intel has a 4 core Xeon chip with 16 MB L3 (Tigerton or resurrected Whitfield) and Montecito in the plans, both of them 1+ billion transistor processors. Sort of crazy, can't imagine the yields being good, but we'll see.
post #26 of 57
IBM, don't let the door smack you in the ass - OOOPS, sorry, looks like it already did!

No wonder Jobs went to Intel.

Next up: Octa cores at 5 GHz w/ SSE Altima*

*Incorporating the altivec instruction set.

Oh but wait, IBM just released their 3 GHz PPC 970mp! Look, it's Freescale, check out their 200 watt 2.2 GHz dual core G4 - awww, isn't it cute?
post #27 of 57
Quote:
Originally posted by msantti
Intel seems to be doing better with the 65nm process than they did with 90nm.

Only because expectations were reset at 90 nm.
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post #28 of 57
Quote:
Originally posted by THT
Itanium needs more cache. So it would be more like 4 cores with 48 MB of cache. A 3 billion transistor chip. If Intel can ship Montecito, a dual-core 2-way MT Itanium chip with 24 MB L3 in Summer of 2006, then I'd have more confidence in Intel shipping a 4 core 2-way MT Itanium chip in 2007, but who knows.

Intel has a 4 core Xeon chip with 16 MB L3 (Tigerton or resurrected Whitfield) and Montecito in the plans, both of them 1+ billion transistor processors. Sort of crazy, can't imagine the yields being good, but we'll see.

Tigerton is kind of a step back, and bummer though. Whitfield had an On Die Memory Controller, and now Tigerton does not. Now no one anticipates intel to have an O.D.M.C until 2009. This is the kind of thing that got Apple behind in it's expectations from IBM, and lead their relationship into trouble. First you have it, then you don't. I'm looking at stuff like this as a reason for Apple to use less expensive AMD quad cored Opteron MP (8 cores total) processors in the Xserve. and Pro Macintosh sooner rather than 2009. I mean why not?
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post #29 of 57
Quote:
Originally posted by onlooker
Tigerton is kind of a step back, and bummer though. Whitfield had an On Die Memory Controller, and now Tigerton does not. Now no one anticipates intel to have an O.D.M.C until 2009. This is the kind of thing that got Apple behind in it's expectations from IBM, and lead their relationship into trouble. First you have it, then you don't. I'm looking at stuff like this as a reason for Apple to use less expensive AMD quad cored Opteron MP (8 cores total) processors in the Xserve. and Pro Macintosh sooner rather than 2009. I mean why not?

Having an on-chip memory controller isn't the be-all-and-end-all of chip design.
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post #30 of 57
Quote:
Originally posted by Programmer
Having an on-chip memory controller isn't the be-all-and-end-all of chip design.

#1) You missed the point.

#2) I didn't say it was, but it is the direction intel is driving to, and if they are not getting it done in time they are falling behind.

#3) = #2) is the point.

[edit] #4 AMD has been using ODMC for quite some time, and if I recall correctly. it was the first ODMC based AMD processors that put AMD ahead of intel in processor performance. They have not fallen behind intel sense.
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post #31 of 57
Quote:
Originally posted by onlooker


[edit] #4 AMD has been using ODMC for quite some time, and if I recall correctly. it was the first ODMC based AMD processors that put AMD ahead of intel in processor performance. They have not fallen behind intel sense.

Maybe not in the desktop market but AMD is behind in the notebook market. I think the later is the future of the money making.
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post #32 of 57
They may be "behind" but that depends on how you define what's "forward".

If you define forward as low-power good-performance, then Intel is the king. If you define forward as 64-bit, low-power, good-performance, then AMD is the king.

Intel has the edge now because they just released their dual-core mobile processor. But AMD is expected to release their dual-core, 64-bit processor soon and then things kinda change.
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post #33 of 57
What is the name for that AMD cpu that you are referring to, Gene Clean?
post #34 of 57
So true, but I was really only considering, and mentioning AMD for XServes, and Pro Macintoshes. The Laptop processor tech lead will likely remain in the hands of intel.

Although I don't see how the laptop market could effect, or cross into the Workstation, or Server market in anyway. There is totally different reasoning behind the purchase of each for professionals. .
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post #35 of 57
Quote:
Originally posted by NordicMan
What is the 'name' for that AMD cpu that you are referring to, Gene Clean?

Yeah Gene, WTF is that clever AMD processor you refer to on the portable front? Turion64 (Project Taylor) with Yamato platform?
Current AMD Turion competed with Intel Pentium M. Now Intel Core Solo and Core Duo are out and have far better performance for about the same TDP.
The dualcore variant of AMD Turion64 (Taylor and its 30W TDP, succeeded by Trinidad with its 60W TDP, both targeted for 2006) will still be manufactured with a 90 nm process.
In this timeframe for laptops, and as pointed by bcwake, Intel will have after Yonah: Merom in mid-2006 and Gilo in early 2007 @ 65 nm, and Penryn @ 45nm in H2'2007.

On the desktop front, the first "K9" quadcore AMD, derivative from Athlon64 X2, will hit market no sooner than 2007 too. As for Intel the same year (Kentsfield, Cloverton and Tigerton).
post #36 of 57
Quote:
Originally posted by aplnub
Why are Fabs located in Israel? Is that a second silicon valley, or great tax advantages, or just coincidence?

[list=1][*]Availability of engineers (that's the silicon valley thing)[*]Government subsidy (bringing high-tech industry to unemployment-stricken Kiryat Gat)[*]Proximity to where the processors are designed (not sure that is a real advantage)[*]Slightly cheaper labor than in the US, but much closer culturally than China.[/list=1]
post #37 of 57
Quote:
Originally posted by synp
Proximity to where the processors are designed (not sure that is a real advantage)

It is. It means design and manufacturing teams can work together very closely.
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post #38 of 57
Quote:
Originally posted by BRussell
So we can have funny names for our processors, like Yonah and Merom. I'm hoping for a quad-core 45 nm Yitzhak.

Names like "Banias", "Dotan", "Yonah" and "Merom" are internal development names, just like Tiger or Longhorn.

All the processors designed in Haifa are named after mountain streams in the Galilee (no American or European would call these things rivers). I don't think there's one called Yitzhak.
post #39 of 57
Quote:
Originally posted by Hyde
So you think Apple will announce Merom Books at Paris? I'm going abroad to Japan at end of August, and I'll need a laptop. Or do you guys think I could get one for about the same price in Japan?

With the current yen/dollar rate, I believe that Apple computers are actually cheaper right now in Japan. But as you know the yen rate is always in flux. Can't forecast the price in August.

BTW, you will need to get used the Japanese keyboard if you buy one here (Japan).
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post #40 of 57
Quote:
Originally posted by Cosmos 1999
Yeah Gene, WTF is that clever AMD processor you refer to on the portable front? Turion64 (Project Taylor) with Yamato platform?

It's called AMD Taylor.

Quote:
Current AMD Turion competed with Intel Pentium M.

And I was talking about a future chip, no?


Quote:
Now Intel Core Solo and Core Duo are out and have far better performance for about the same TDP.

Again, I was talking about the future Turion64.

Quote:
The dualcore variant of AMD Turion64 (Taylor and its 30W TDP, succeeded by Trinidad with its 60W TDP, both targeted for 2006) will still be manufactured with a 90 nm process.

You just forgot to tell us that they will migrate to a 65nm process soon after.

Quote:
AMD Taylor will first appear on IBM's 90nm Silicon on insulator (SOI) process, but will migrate to 65nm, likely with Silicon-Germanium (SiGe) stressed process which was recently achieved through the combined effort of IBM and AMD, with 40% improvement over comparable 65nm processes.


Quote:
On the desktop front, the first "K9" quadcore AMD, derivative from Athlon64 X2, will hit market no sooner than 2007 too. As for Intel the same year (Kentsfield, Cloverton and Tigerton).

Somehow I have a feeling that AMD will still kick Intel's ass in the desktop, and compete very nicely in the notebook arena. Regardless of Intel codenames and such.
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