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What do you drive? - Page 2

post #41 of 90
How's the maintenance on those Volvos? I've hear some horror stories.
post #42 of 90
Frequent. Expensive. Frequently expensive.
post #43 of 90
Quote:
Originally posted by trick fall
How's the maintenance on those Volvos? I've hear some horror stories.

My 1995 850 turbo was the lowest maintenance vehicle that I have ever owned ($500/year - compared to the $2000/year that I was spending on my 1997 Dodge grand caravan).

1997-2001 were rough years for Volvo reliability, right after they were bought by Ford.

Now they have re-gained their old quality, but I would still avoid any 1st model year Volvo (like the new S80 that is just coming out, or the 2003 XC90).
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post #44 of 90
I drive a 100gig, 7200 RPM, Seagate ... the one with the 8MB cache... yeah.. that one.

It handles really nice and the ride is really quiet.

post #45 of 90
A single repair on the wife's XC70: the headlamp wiper seccumbed to ash (we live near an active volcano). $20 in three years isn't bad.

 

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post #46 of 90
a 2006 Chevy Equinox LT AWD. I get 19/24. Which is right on to its fuel economy estimates(18/23). Cost me $22 to fill with 1/4 left.
post #47 of 90
post #48 of 90
Volvos?!

Wasn't there a survey recently that said that many iTunes users were VW/Audi owners?

Count me as a former Audi owner and current VW owner. Jetta Wagon 1.8 Turbo.

C'mon you VW/Audi lurkers--post!
post #49 of 90
Those little Volvos should be more reliable, now that they're actually Mazdas:

http://cars.about.com/cs/familysedan...lvos40_tst.htm

Not much different from the little Saabs that are actually Subarus.
post #50 of 90
Quote:
Originally posted by bikertwin
Count me as a former Audi owner and current VW owner. Jetta Wagon 1.8 Turbo.

C'mon you VW/Audi lurkers--post!

Those new Audis are just sexy.
post #51 of 90
Quote:
Originally posted by bikertwin
Those little Volvos should be more reliable, now that they're actually Mazdas:

http://cars.about.com/cs/familysedan...lvos40_tst.htm

Not much different from the little Saabs that are actually Subarus.

Volvo reliability has always been head and shoulders above Mazda - but the S40 is not a Mazda, any more than any other
shared platform vehicle (Jaguar/Lincoln, Lamborghini/VW, etc).
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post #52 of 90
Quote:
Originally posted by e1618978
Volvo reliability has always been head and shoulders above Mazda - but the S40 is not a Mazda, any more than any other
shared platform vehicle (Jaguar/Lincoln, Lamborghini/VW, etc).

Volvo is a mixed bag. Pre-ford Volvos will run forever, but their electronics will go to crap. This is typical of European cars of that era. With newer volvos, it seems to depend largely on the model.

Mazda gets a bad rep from all the rotary vehicles they make. The Mazda3/Euro Ford Focus/Volvo S40 is a very well made platform and has a good service record. Other Mazda models haven't been so lucky, but it's the price you pay since Mazdas are drive better than their equivalent Japanese counterparts.

If the rumored rally version of the Mazda3 existed when I was buying, there's a good chance I would have bought it. Instead, they came out with the Mazdaspeed6, which I think kind of misses the point.

The only cars I'm aware of, these days, that spend an inordinate amount of time in the shop are VWs.
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post #53 of 90
Quote:
Originally posted by bikertwin
Those little Volvos should be more reliable, now that they're actually Mazdas:

http://cars.about.com/cs/familysedan...lvos40_tst.htm

Not much different from the little Saabs that are actually Subarus.

Sheesh, you seem to make out that all Volvo's are Mazda's and all of Saab is Subaru. The 9-2x is the only Saab that is a Subaru. The 9-3x and 9-5x are totally independent from Subaru. The 9-7x if you couldn't tell is a Chevy Trailblazer, but it is pretty darn nice. The 9-3x is based off of the Epsilon platform that also underpins the Malibu, G6, and the upcoming Saturn Aura. The 9-5x is based off of a modified Opel platform.

EDIT: Also expect the 9-2x to be phased out due to GM selling its stock in Subaru.
post #54 of 90
Quote:
Originally posted by ShawnJ
Those new Audis are just sexy.

I agree. I fell in love with the A8 W12 when I watched "Transporter 2" - but the guys on the audiworld page say that the transmission is crappy and unreliable. The new S8 with the Lamborghini V10 looks like it will avoid the problems - particularly next year with the DSG transmission.

I liked the old S6 avant better than the new A6 models, though.
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post #55 of 90
1988 Lincoln Mark VII.

When I first got in the driver's seat, it reminded me so much of my 1969 Mustang in terms of how the doors, quarter windows, even the rearview mirror felt. I was convinced a bunch of guys who drove Mustangs in the late '60s were hired by Ford to make a Lincoln sportscar and just designed a wind-tunnelled version of what they were familiar with.

Two weeks ago, it had its 600,000 km birthday (about 400,000 miles). My Location is North America, and I mean it!

When I put her out to pasture, I figure I'll get me one of those (now) new Mustangs used. Never owned a new car, never plan to.
post #56 of 90
Quote:
Originally posted by e1618978
I agree. I fell in love with the A8 W12 . . .

The last (and only) Audi I ever felt something for was the olde RS2

Do you know where your turbo is?

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post #57 of 90
Quote:
Originally posted by quagmire
Sheesh, you seem to make out that all Volvo's are Mazda's and all of Saab is Subaru. ... The 9-7x if you couldn't tell is a Chevy Trailblazer,

No, I just said the little ones.

And that 9-7x is sad, really:

http://www.automobilemag.com/reviews...0509_saab_97x/

I mean, it doesn't bother me at all that Audis, VWs, and Porsches are all based off the same platform. They're all German engineered. Sure, some are built in Mexico, but they all drive like sports cars/SUVs.

My wife has a Subaru. It does not drive anything like a VW. Her Subaru is very dependable, willing, & able, but it does not in any way resemble a European/German car in the way it handles.

But I guess it's like computers--some prefer Macs, others prefer Windows. Some don't really care, it's just a computer.
post #58 of 90
Quote:
Originally posted by Splinemodel
The last (and only) Audi I ever felt something for was the olde RS2

Do you know where your turbo is?


Very nice! Those wheels remind me of an old Audi site from the dot-com bubble. It was called SeansA4.com, or something like that. Beautiful Hibiscus red A4 with those same wheels.

Ahhhh, the good old days.
post #59 of 90
I am a the proud owner of a 2004 VW Jetta TDI-40mpg at the pump (mixed highway/city driving). Could hypothetically run biodiesel, but I think I'll wait until that market stabilizes.

Never had any problems except a bad lock mechanism that screwed up within a week of my purchase. Oil changes are pretty expensive too-but a reliable car so far (40,000 miles already due to heavy traveling/commuting)
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post #60 of 90
I can do my part to up the VW numbers in here...
2004 Jetta 1.8t. I usually get around 22-24 mpg with mostly local driving. That goes up to around 27 when I throw in highway stuff. The car is theoretically supposed to get better mileage, but I'm guessing that actually putting the turbo engine to decent use brings the numbers down a bit.
post #61 of 90
Quote:
Originally posted by Gizzmonic
I am a the proud owner of a 2004 VW Jetta TDI-40mpg at the pump (mixed highway/city driving). Could hypothetically run biodiesel, but I think I'll wait until that market stabilizes.

Never had any problems except a bad lock mechanism that screwed up within a week of my purchase. Oil changes are pretty expensive too-but a reliable car so far (40,000 miles already due to heavy traveling/commuting)

Look out when it hits 60k. The Jetta TDIs seem to have trouble around 60k, although these problems may have been solved by the 2004 model year. 99-01 definitely had the 60k bug.
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post #62 of 90
2002 Saturn SL2 34MPG Highway/27'ish' in town (10 Gallon Tank)
post #63 of 90
Wow so many gas guzzlers... I drive my girlfriends 1999 Toyota Tercel but in the near future I hope to buy the new 2006 Honda Civic Hybrid.

Here's a link to some nice pics, http://www.hybridcars.com/civic_photos.html

Every car I buy must be a hybrid... yes I'm a hybrid car fan!!!

If anyone is interested in learning the real facts about hybrids and get the latest news check out these sites, there great!
http://www.hybridcars.com/
http://www.mixedpower.com/

PS. My girlfriend wants a Toyota Prius!
MacBook 1.83GHz, 1GB of Ram --> A more elegant notebook, for a more civilized age

An apple a day, keeps Microsoft away
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post #64 of 90
Quote:
Originally posted by Darth_Apple
Wow so many gas guzzlers... I drive my girlfriends 1999 Toyota Tercel but in the near future I hope to buy the new 2006 Honda Civic Hybrid.

Every car I buy must be a hybrid... yes I'm a hybrid car fan!!!

I'd be right on getting a hybrid if the prices went down a little bit. Philosophically (and technilogically, and coolness-wise), they're great...economically, I can't really justify them for myself quite yet.
post #65 of 90
I love driving, but don't drive much since I don't have a commute to work and I ride my bicycle everywhere.
So I'm going to get rid of my '99 Accord Coupe (only 26K miles) and get an old Porsche 911 for weekend fun.

I like the looks of this 1978 911 SC:


But I'll likely get something newer, like this 1987 911:
post #66 of 90
Be careful! - I've heard that older 911s have a nasty habit of throwing you into the nearest tree.

Anyhow, I drive something much less sexy - A Toyota Corolla! It's actually a 2005 model, and is a great car, especially as I've only passed my test just before I bought it and cars are much more expensive here in the UK compared with the US.

I thought that I would add my thoughts on the differences between US and European car buyers, just to aid the conversation (though I think that most of the posters here can be thought of as 'honorary Europeans' for these purposes!):

1. Why is the American idea of a luxury car just a very big version of their small and crappy one?

2. Am I the only one who is irrationally irritated by GM? Here in the UK, we have Vauxhall (basically the same as Opel), and they just seem so boring, soulless, and 'middle of the road'.

3. Do American buyers value their lives at all? If you look at American price lists, most airbags, stability control, and even ABS for the love of God is OPTIONAL!

4. The one thing I think America has got right with cars is the automatic transmission - my Toyota is, and despite the worse fuel economy, it's absolutely great.

David.
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post #67 of 90
Quote:
Originally posted by iMacfan
. . .
I thought that I would add my thoughts on the differences between US and European car buyers, . . .

US and European car buying habits aren't as different as you think. Compact luxury cars, such as the BMW 3-series, etc, sell quite well (which, aside from the M3, are by no means sports cars).

The major differences are the markets themselves:

1. Engines here are bigger.

2. No one can drive stick. This is good if you are a fan of the stick, since people won't bug you to borrow your car.

3. More people buy trucks. Some of it may have to do with the fact that business owners can get tax exemptions for corporate vehicles as long as they are "utility oriented" (i.e. trucks). There are a LOT of small business owners in the states who merge company utility with personal use.

4. Despite the fact that there are a ton of V6's and even V8's on the road, people drive fucking slow. I blame this on the automatic transmission. 66% percent of drivers here probably never break 3000 rpm. Seriously.

5. Safety is more of less the same. Most cars out there have airbags and anti-lock brakes.

6. GM is a mixed bag. They make great trucks (so does Ford). The Chevrolet line is pure automotive valium, but there are a few standouts. The Corvette is actually pretty solid, but it has a redneck image. The Pontiac GTO is a Holden Monaro, and I like it. The Saturn Ion Redlne / Chevrolet Cobalt GT is overpriced but decent. The Cadillac CTS-V is sweeeeet. The Cadillac line in general is fairly edgy, although also generally expensive.

7. V8's aren't so bad on gas here, since some of the cylinders shut off when you're mid-throttle. It's not unusual for American V6's and V8's to have better fuel economy than European and Japanese four-bangers -- especially turbo four-bangers.
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post #68 of 90
Interesting - I was worried that I might get flamed for my views, and instead I got a really informative reply - Thank you!
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post #69 of 90
98 Passat - wife's car
00 Excursion - not used as much any more since we bought a Town and Country
02 F 150 - 86,000 on it and it gets worked out a lot
05 Town and Country - mine

As for the limited number of sticks in the US, I believe it is because it is hard to shift while talking on the phone (still too many people without handfree) and eating or drinking. Cup holders are more important.

reg
post #70 of 90
Quote:
Originally posted by reg
98 Passat - wife's car
00 Excursion - not used as much any more since we bought a Town and Country
02 F 150 - 86,000 on it and it gets worked out a lot
05 Town and Country - mine

As for the limited number of sticks in the US, I believe it is because it is hard to shift while talking on the phone (still too many people without handfree) and eating or drinking. Cup holders are more important.

reg

I think it has more to do with the fact that American automakers were the first to market automatic transmissions. It seems likely that the automatic transmission is an American invention. Anyway, back in the 50's, when automatic transmissions were getting popular, no one had cell phones or cupholders.
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post #71 of 90
Quote:
Originally posted by Splinemodel

The major differences are the markets themselves:


6. GM is a mixed bag. They make great trucks (so does Ford). The Chevrolet line is pure automotive valium, but there are a few standouts. The Corvette is actually pretty solid, but it has a redneck image. The Pontiac GTO is a Holden Monaro, and I like it. The Saturn Ion Redlne / Chevrolet Cobalt GT is overpriced but decent. The Cadillac CTS-V is sweeeeet. The Cadillac line in general is fairly edgy, although also generally expensive.

7. V8's aren't so bad on gas here, since some of the cylinders shut off when you're mid-throttle. It's not unusual for American V6's and V8's to have better fuel economy than European and Japanese four-bangers -- especially turbo four-bangers. [/B]

You mean Cobalt SS. The GT name is Pontiacs tagline along with GTP and GXP. That decent will go to awesome once the Pontiac Solstice GXP engine goes into it. Which is a Ecotec 2.0 Turbo'd with Direct Injection which produces 260 HP and 260 lb of torque. Well Cadillac is in no means the avg Joe car. It is a luxury/performance brand. If rumors pan out, with the Corvette SS producing 600+ HP, then that gives Caddy access to the so far exclusive LS7 thats in the Z06. You know the unofficial rule at GM. " No car will out power the Corvette." V8's here aren't bad on fuel. Especially GM's Small Block V8's. The Z06 has 505 hp and is a big 7 liters. Yet it gets 16/26. Super car performance without the sacrifice of fuel economy.
post #72 of 90
Quote:
Originally posted by bikertwin
Volvos?!

Wasn't there a survey recently that said that many iTunes users were VW/Audi owners?

Count me as a former Audi owner and current VW owner. Jetta Wagon 1.8 Turbo.

C'mon you VW/Audi lurkers--post!

There you go. Jetta Wagon 1.8 turbo, me too.

Room, decent milage, fun when you want it. What model year do you have?

When I was looking I monitored all the window regulator/mass air sensor/ignition coil horror stories, and it seemed like as of the '03 model year they had been addressed. 40k miles so far and no worries.
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post #73 of 90
Sigma 'Nemesis' with Look carbon forks and Dedecciai 'Blacktail' backend / seatpost, Campagnolo 'Centaur' headset, Shimano Ultegra throughout, Mavic Open Pro rims.

White.

Yum.
post #74 of 90
My wife and I share a 1997 GMC Sonoma (4-Cyl) and a 2002 Focus Wagon. Filled the truck this morning for $34 (around 22 mpg); the Focus is usually less than $30 (30 mpg).

In three years, when the Sonoma hits 200k miles (knock-on-wood), we'll retire it to occasional use, and pick-up a two year old Mazda5 or MPV, depending on gas prices at the time
post #75 of 90
I drive a "Flex Car" linky

& when I don't need the flexcar, I use a bike or my feet.

I pay nothing each month for insurance & I pay nothing for gas. The flexcar costs me $9 per hour, unlimited miles, no annual fee, no insurance.

btw: A lot of the flexcars in my town are Honda Civic Hybrids. They get just OK gas mileage considering their touted "green" image.

If one drives the Honda like a regular car, expect 30-33 mpg - maybe. If one drives it very, very slowly...and carefully...and if one doesn't have a "lead foot" then it is possible to hover around 40 mpg in the city. I think a lot of people would be put off by the noise the Honda makes...when braking, it sounds like sirens/alarms going off.

The Toyota Prius is an awesome car to drive, and certainly gets the MPG (in the city) that Toyota claims. Again, one musn't have a lead foot or the mileage goes WAY down.
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post #76 of 90
This is how I go to and from workevery day:



It costs HK$2, or about one U.S. quarter, each way.

Needless to say, I have very low transportation costs.
post #77 of 90
Quote:
Originally posted by hardeeharhar
I use my feet. It costs about 8 dollars to fill up.

lol.. ..well im from singapore that why i have a different car model but i drive a mitsubishi 1996 lancer glxi...takes me 30$ to fill...
post #78 of 90
Thanks for your post, i'd just like to add some of my observations to your observations.
Quote:
Originally posted by Splinemodel

The major differences are the markets themselves:

1. Engines here are bigger.

As much as i love the US and US cars, i sometimes am at a loss to understand why so many 200+ HP cars are being sold in the US. After living several years in the US, i'm now living in Norway, and even in the mountains here or driving along the fjords i find that my Saab with a 2.0 liter/133HP car works just fine for everything i throw at it. Do i really need to go from 0-60mph in 6.4 seconds instead of 10? Apart from those four seconds, it's the speed limits limiting my progress, not the amounts of horsepower 8). But then again, i never understood the city people driving Hummers, or Volvo XC's.

Quote:
5. Safety is more of less the same. Most cars out there have airbags and anti-lock brakes.

Unfortunately that is not all there is to safety. High trucks tend to swerve/topple over quicker and do more damage to pedestrians or other people involved in accidents. Brake distance is another important thing that's not mentioned. Safety consists of a lot of factors, with airbags and their likes only being the last step of reducing trauma while in fact crashing. There's a swedish institution analyzing actual accidents and those data show in fact that there are relatively more personal injuries in accidents involving [american] trucks, including, but not limited to the people sitting in that truck.

Having said that, my next car probably is either gonna be Swedish [american owned ] or pure american again.
post #79 of 90
Not my picture, but it's close enough.

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post #80 of 90
Quote:
Originally posted by RoguePat
Thanks for your post, i'd just like to add some of my observations to your observations.


As much as i love the US and US cars, i sometimes am at a loss to understand why so many 200+ HP cars are being sold in the US. After living several years in the US, i'm now living in Norway, . . .


200hp is just a number, and a lot of the big, low-compression, lean-mixture pushrod V6's (take for example the GM3800/3900) get comparable fuel economy to your Saab during normal driving. The trick isThey are also about 1000 times more reliable (flame bait, yes). Generally speaking, the GM 3.5L and larger V6's seem to compare to European 2.4-3.0L engines in terms of fuel economy.

I think you'll find that American cars are quite respectable in the safety department, even when considering more than just the few points I made. Just like any other nation's cars, there are cars that are more safe and cars that are less safe, but I think you'll find that the averages coincide.

Quote:
Having said that, my next car probably is either gonna be Swedish [american owned ] or pure american again.

I really like the Saab 9-3. My friend and co-worker has one, and it's a solid car. I bought a Subaru WRX instead, which is a pretty similar car, except it's ugly, not posh at all. . . but has AWD and a 2L four that's in it's element when you boost the bejeezes out of it.
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