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Apple to ship 10 million Macs in 2006?

post #1 of 43
Thread Starter 
Apple Computer is expected to ship a total of 10 million desktops and notebooks in 2006, according to a report from overseas.

Major manufacturing contractors Foxconn Electronics, Quanta Computer and Asustek Computer stand to benefit, the Chinese-langued Economic Daily News cited Taiwan PC manufacturers as saying.

Foxconn -- otherwise known as Hon Hai -- manufactures Apple's Mac mini computers, while Quanta has been taking orders for the PowerBook product line and Asustek the iBook line, according to a report by DigiTimes.

The Economic Daily News report further noted that Quanta has also won the bid to manufacture Apples MacBook Pro, which supports a 2GHz Intel Core Duo processor, and began shipping last week.

The reliability of this report is unknown.

Apple in the 2005 calendar year sold approximately 4.75 million Mac systems, according to calculations performed by AppleInsider. Sales of 10 million Macs in 2006 would represent over a 100 percent increase in sales year-over-year.
post #2 of 43
I'd like to see 10m Macs sold this year, as I'm sure Apple would too, but I reckon the rise won't be as astronomical as that. Yes, the transition is going well and the backlog of upgrade starved user demand is waiting in anticipation for the full range ... but 2006 is short bearing in mind the Intel PowerMac will only have been on sale a few months at best. These models are all going to be a roaring success, but 2006 is a tight timeframe seeing as they're hardly all shipping as we speak.

However I have big expectations of Macs moving into the mainstream in the next few years: provided Vista works on them so easily that Joe Average can run it (a 3rd party solution maybe with dual boot preinstallation before purchase could be a real business opportunity there).

Vista is going to push a lot of the Windows userbase into hardware upgrades anyway and how Leopard and the new Macs play into this active market should be quite entertaining.

PS: make a tablet Mac now!!!
post #3 of 43
10 million Macs would be the result of many consumers and businesses making the Switch.

I'd love to see 10 million Macs sold in 2006, not sure if it will happen but I expect the numbers to surpass the number of units sold in 2005.
post #4 of 43
Quote:
Originally posted by AppleInsider
The Economic Daily News report further noted that Quanta has also won the bid to manufacture Apples MacBook Pro, which supports a 2GHz Intel Core Duo processor, and began shipping last week.

they must be kidding. THEY HAVEN'T BEGAN SHIPPING LAST WEEK!
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MBP 15" Unibody GHz 500GB 4GB
iPhone 3GS 16GB
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post #5 of 43
It won't happen. Or, if it does, it'll be more because people are swallowing up the G5 machines then the intel ones.

The intel move will spur some sales for those who need the end-all/be-all, plus some who've been waiting for them to finally upgrade. But there's a huge population of mac users who will:[list=a][*]Buy G5s because they need classic compatibility[*]Buy G5s because their software/drivers/etc won't run in Rosetta[*]Wait for the rev 1 bugs to be worked out[*]Wait for universal versions of their pro apps[*]Wait for the model of computer and price range that they want[/list=a]

I can see a bump in purchases, if you believe that there's a trend going on, but doubling sales? Not going to happen.
post #6 of 43
I could see it happening if Apple laptops could dual boot Windows as well. I just bought a new PC laptop that would've been an Apple laptop if the MBP could run Windows natively.

I wish I didn't need to buy a PC, but SQL Server & Visual Studio only runs on Windows.
post #7 of 43
Quote:
Originally posted by fuyutsuki
...but 2006 is short bearing in mind the Intel PowerMac will only have been on sale a few months at best. These models are all going to be a roaring success, but 2006 is a tight timeframe seeing as they're hardly all shipping as we speak.

The PowerMacs are NOT going to be a roaring success. They're too expensive, compared to other models. Most current mac users do not buy these machines because they don't have the money or don't need the extras. Switchers will ignore them because they're way too expensive for what you get. They're geared right to the pro market.

And the pro market isn't going to go nuts and buy these up until
[list=1][*]they're apps are converted to universal binaries (and whoknows how long that'll take)[*]the apps that aren't converted are tested and verified as working under Rosetta, and that there's a noticable performance gain running it under Rosetta[*]they pull themselves completely from Classic (if they still use it for this or that)[*]they're sure that they have drivers and such for all their external devices, hardware, printers, etc, etc, etc. [/list=1]

Pros have bigger concerns then just "its a little faster". Remember, they were the last to switch to OS X because of all the incompatibilities between their existing setups and OS X, even with OS X's benefits like protected memory, preemptive multitasking, etc, etc, etc.


Quote:
Originally posted by fuyutsuki
However I have big expectations of Macs moving into the mainstream in the next few years: provided Vista works on them so easily that Joe Average can run it (a 3rd party solution maybe with dual boot preinstallation before purchase could be a real business opportunity there).

Dual-boot users is not a large segment that is going to drive switchers. Most users do not want to dual-boot. They just want to open their computers, work, and then close it up again. if they have to boot into windows to do this or that, they'll end up keeping it in windows, which Apple won't care on a computer sales basis, but it does nothing to improve the OS X mindset or marketshare.
post #8 of 43
Quote:
Originally posted by Louzer
It won't happen. Or, if it does, it'll be more because people are swallowing up the G5 machines then the intel ones.

i don't think so, apple started killing their bestselling powerpc products already.
Quote:
The intel move will spur some sales for those who need the end-all/be-all, plus some who've been waiting for them to finally upgrade. But there's a huge population of mac users who will:[list=a][*]Buy G5s because they need classic compatibility[*]Buy G5s because their software/drivers/etc won't run in Rosetta[*]Wait for the rev 1 bugs to be worked out[*]Wait for universal versions of their pro apps[*]Wait for the model of computer and price range that they want[/list=a]

i think the huge population of option a to c will actually be a huge minority.

option d is a problem for a lot of potential customers, but also a minority.
(including me, but i will buy an intel mac this year anyway, and adobe CS3 universal binaries when available)

option e is indeed a large group who, according to apple, will be served in 2006.
Quote:
I can see a bump in purchases, if you believe that there's a trend going on, but doubling sales? Not going to happen.

i agree.

o and fok dual boot
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post #9 of 43
The greatest sales prediction I've seen up until this was 8.6 million units, which I thought was too high as well.

My own estimates have been between 6 million and 7 million.

Of course, if the PPC sales dive too early, and Apple can't get the x86 machines out fast enough, even 6 million might prove to be too high.

But I hope not.
post #10 of 43
Quote:
Originally posted by gar
i don't think so, apple started killing their bestselling powerpc products already.

The only powerpc product they've killed is the iMac. I don't know if that's their best-selling product, nor does anyone, technically, because, IIRC, Apple stopped announcing sales of their different models.

But on the iMac, they killed production and then let sales run out. Those ran out quickly, so either there was a big buy-up, or Apple actually guessed correctly on when to end production on the earlier version (I can't believe the second one). I, for one, specifically bought an iMac G5 for my mother for XMas because I feared the intels were coming soon. She's uses too much stuff that's classic only for me to try to find alternatives in the OS X world (that also would work on rosetta). hell, it was hard enough to get her to take the iMac.
post #11 of 43
Quote:
Originally posted by Louzer
The only powerpc product they've killed is the iMac. I don't know if that's their best-selling product, nor does anyone, technically, because, IIRC, Apple stopped announcing sales of their different models.

But on the iMac, they killed production and then let sales run out. Those ran out quickly, so either there was a big buy-up, or Apple actually guessed correctly on when to end production on the earlier version (I can't believe the second one). I, for one, specifically bought an iMac G5 for my mother for XMas because I feared the intels were coming soon. She's uses too much stuff that's classic only for me to try to find alternatives in the OS X world (that also would work on rosetta). hell, it was hard enough to get her to take the iMac.

Is (was) she a PC person? If so, how does she feel about it now?

My friend got an iMac for his (then) 83 year old mom, and it's turned her life around.
post #12 of 43
If the 3 major manufacturers are Apple's line are making projections that means they have accounted for their product line transitions. This should give one some idea as to when the iBook and PowerMac will transition, let alone the XServe line.
post #13 of 43
Quote:
Originally posted by Louzer
The only powerpc product they've killed is the iMac. I don't know if that's their best-selling product, nor does anyone, technically, because, IIRC, Apple stopped announcing sales of their different models.

i thought i read it somewhere a while ago...
Quote:
But on the iMac, they killed production and then let sales run out. Those ran out quickly, so either there was a big buy-up, or Apple actually guessed correctly on when to end production on the earlier version (I can't believe the second one). I, for one, specifically bought an iMac G5 for my mother for XMas because I feared the intels were coming soon. She's uses too much stuff that's classic only for me to try to find alternatives in the OS X world (that also would work on rosetta). hell, it was hard enough to get her to take the iMac.

of course, she wanted you to wait for the intel iMac, now her brand new computer has become obsolete overnight
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post #14 of 43
this speculation of such huge sales forcast makes me wonder if the manufactureres know something of a new product release (like the mythical mini dvr or whatever) that could spur massive sales? These companies are pretty savy on there production estimates i'd assume, so mabe theres more to this than just the increase in sales from the Intel switch. Any thoughts?
post #15 of 43
Quote:
Originally posted by saschke
they must be kidding. THEY HAVEN'T BEGAN SHIPPING LAST WEEK!

Maybe that meant they left port and are still floating on their way to California.
post #16 of 43
Dual boot Windows XPee and Mac OS X please please please please please ... Is there a petition going on this somewhere?

I read "all apple has to do" is enable "backward-BIOS-compatibility" in the EFI or something like that.

If they do that, my stab in the dark is that they will boost sales of all their Intel Macs by at least 20%.
post #17 of 43
Quote:
Originally posted by mikenap
this speculation of such huge sales forcast makes me wonder if the manufactureres know something of a new product release (like the mythical mini dvr or whatever) that could spur massive sales? These companies are pretty savy on there production estimates i'd assume, so mabe theres more to this than just the increase in sales from the Intel switch. Any thoughts?


good point. or at least, good speculation there....
post #18 of 43
Quote:
Originally posted by sunilraman
Dual boot Windows XPee and Mac OS X please please please please please ... Is there a petition going on this somewhere?

I read "all apple has to do" is enable "backward-BIOS-compatibility" in the EFI or something like that.

If they do that, my stab in the dark is that they will boost sales of all their Intel Macs by at least 20%.

Simply "enable" BIOS compatibility? Is it from a credible source? I don't know much about BIOS, EFI or their development kits, but I am somewhat skeptical that it would be such a simple thing. It is concievable though, as Intel may have a complete development kit where backward compatibility is a module. I do hope they do add it but my belief is that they wouldn't, if it were easy and would generate sufficient sales and not contradict the vaporous and occasionally infuriating "Apple way", I would think they would have already done so.
post #19 of 43
Quote:
Originally posted by JeffDM
Simply "enable" BIOS compatibility? Is it from a credible source? I don't know much about BIOS, EFI or their development kits, but I am somewhat skeptical that it would be such a simple thing. It is concievable though, as Intel may have a complete development kit where backward compatibility is a module. I do hope they do add it but my belief is that they wouldn't, if it were easy and would generate sufficient sales and not contradict the vaporous and occasionally infuriating "Apple way", I would think they would have already done so.


"the vaporous and occasionally infuriating "Apple way"" --- mate, here is the main reason why it might never happen. it's not the technology, it is VERY likely to boost sales imo, it's not the complexity. the reason why dual boot is not enabled (and may never be) is probably only known to stevie J and his closest advisors.

EFI info here:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Extensi...ware_Interface

"Intel currently offers PC motherboards supporting EFI. All Intel's 945-chipset boards support EFI, it is just disabled. However, Microsoft Windows and other BIOS Operating Systems continue to run due to a compatibility layer."

that said, i don't have any info on whether current intel macs can be made to dual boot.

apparently "Linux systems have been able to use EFI at boot time since early 2004, using the elilo EFI boot loader." according to the wikipedia entry.... the catch is that distros need to be updated to work with elilo...

now. vista supports EFI. does vista beta 1.x or whatever support EFI? how come we haven't heard anything yet about vista beta installation on intel macs ?

just thinking aloud here feel free y'all to fill in the details.
post #20 of 43
just one more short note before i am accused of hijacking this thread. supposed "instructions" for dual-booting your intel mac (hardmac.com has warned that something like this is HIGHLY RISKY AND COULD F*** UP YOUR INTEL MAC FOREVER)

http://neosmart.net/blog/dual-bootin...-on-a-macbook/
http://neosmart.net/blog/hardware-mo...on-a-macintel/
post #21 of 43
Quote:
Originally posted by sunilraman
good point. or at least, good speculation there....

The one thing that can't be predicted (except by just being lucky) is sales.

No one can know what the takeup by consumers will be. I don't know how they are coming out with these numbers. This is a Chinese rag. They might just being optimistic about other Chinese companies. Who knows whether these numbers are even politically motivated to make these companies look better that they really are. It wouldn't be the first time the Chinese government has done that.
post #22 of 43
Quote:
Originally posted by sunilraman
Dual boot Windows XPee and Mac OS X please please please please please ... Is there a petition going on this somewhere?

I read "all apple has to do" is enable "backward-BIOS-compatibility" in the EFI or something like that.

If they do that, my stab in the dark is that they will boost sales of all their Intel Macs by at least 20%.

While I've had my disagreements with Charlie from the Inquirer, his analysis is usually pretty good. I don't agree with his tone here, blaming Apple in the snarky the British seem to like to do, and I've mailed him about it, the article is correct in it's technical areas.

It's worth a read.

http://www.theinquirer.net/?article=29710

We correspond often. My e-mail to him, and his response (actually, his response is on top):

Actually, I know they don't need them. The problem is that they also know that XP will never run, but steadfastly refuse to say that. You could say the same thing about the PPC macs, they did nothing to prevent XP from running on those. They also did nothing to prevent most of the major disasters in the world.

Basically, they are being really sleazy in their PR, and I am calling them on it.

melgross@usa.net wrote:
Charlie, have you thought about the fact that the Mac simply doesn't NEED any of these modules?

Why should Apple put software into its machines that it doesn't need, and then have to support it as well?

MS could, if it wanted to, write, or more likely, modify, these modules itself, assuming that it doesn't have enough similar work already up and running, if it really wanted to sell copies of XP to Mac users. They must have at least 20 programmers to every one that Apple has. You might as well blame them for not moving forward quickly on VPC for these machine as well as Apple for not handing people the necessary code on a platter.

This article is really unfair. Apple DID say that they wouldn't PREVENT people from running Windows on these machines.

They also made it QUITE clear that they wouldn't be doing anything to HELP them run it.

Apple isn't hiding anything here. All the documentation is available from them as to what's in the machines, both hardware, and software.

After all, it's up to those interested in running the OS's to do what has to be done. It isn't up to Apple to give them the means.

A little balance would be nice. A few sentences added to the article would be fair.

Best regards, Mel.
post #23 of 43
Some encouraging news can be see HERE

Quote from the article
Quote:
Don Mayer, CEO of Small Dog Electronics, an Apple products retailer in Waitsfield, Vt., says the Intel-based machines outsell iMacs based on G5 chips from IBM (IBM) by five to one. In fact, Intel-based iMacs are selling out quicker than the iMac G5 desktop did when it came out last October, he says. "As fast as they are coming in, [iMacs with Intel chips] are going out," Mayer says. "There's significantly more demand for the iMac now that it has the Intel processor."

10 million? I don't know about that, but sales may be higher than many of the projections currently making the rounds on the web.
just waiting to be included in one of Apple's target markets.
Don't get me wrong, I like the flat panel iMac, actually own an iMac, and I like the Mac mini, but...........
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just waiting to be included in one of Apple's target markets.
Don't get me wrong, I like the flat panel iMac, actually own an iMac, and I like the Mac mini, but...........
Reply
post #24 of 43
Quote:
Originally posted by rickag
Some encouraging news can be see

Quote from the article
Don Mayer, CEO of Small Dog Electronics, an Apple products retailer in Waitsfield, Vt., says the Intel-based machines outsell iMacs based on G5 chips from IBM (IBM) by five to one. In fact, Intel-based iMacs are selling out quicker than the iMac G5 desktop did when it came out last October, he says. "As fast as they are coming in, [iMacs with Intel chips] are going out," Mayer says. "There's significantly more demand for the iMac now that it has the Intel processor."

10 million? I don't know about that, but sales may be higher than many of the projections currently making the rounds on the web.

Well, since the new iMac wasn't much more than what the previous iMac was, so there wasn't much of a need to just dump iMac G5 for same iMac G5. Plus, less and less people were likely to buy iMacs at the end of the year as they waited for the new intel ones.

The real question is sustainability.
post #25 of 43
Quote:
Originally posted by Louzer
Well, since the new iMac wasn't much more than what the previous iMac was, so there wasn't much of a need to just dump iMac G5 for same iMac G5. Plus, less and less people were likely to buy iMacs at the end of the year as they waited for the new intel ones.

The real question is sustainability.

I'm hoping that with all of the really good reviews it's receiving around the country (and outside it as well) that won't be a problem. When we see the reviews that are in newspapers, regarded as a somewhat neutral source of computer info., we can hope that general computer buyers will be more likely to consider them.
post #26 of 43
you guys are forgetting the nuclear option:






the Apple HDTV with built-in Mac!

Apple sales hit 50M in '06. YOu heard it hear first. Expect to see it posted on Think Secret s0000000000n!!!!!11oneone
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I wish developing great products was as easy as writing a check. If that were the case, then Microsoft would...
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post #27 of 43
They have succesfully duel-booted linux on it, and the beta version of Vista DOES suppot EFI or w/e it is...just saw the linux thing http://www.macnn.com/ (i think)

http://www.macnn.com/articles/06/02/....210.released/

correct me if im wrong, but does it say in there that they have ran windows inside OSX window...on an intel mac?
post #28 of 43
Quote:
Originally posted by rageous
you guys are forgetting the nuclear option:

the Apple HDTV with built-in Mac!

Apple sales hit 50M in '06. YOu heard it hear first. Expect to see it posted on Think Secret s0000000000n!!!!!11oneone


ah, a homage of sorts to Rolo
post #29 of 43
YES. appears to successfully boot Linux on Intel Mac.
http://www.macnn.com/articles/06/02/...imac.core.duo/

Next: XP or Vista
post #30 of 43
The Mighty Melgross speaks! .... and we are all humbled...
post #31 of 43
OpenOSX runs windows inside a window already.
post #32 of 43
Quote:
Originally posted by vinney57
The Mighty Melgross speaks! .... and we are all humbled...

Wow Vinney, that was a brilliant post!

Did I insult you?
post #33 of 43
Quote:
Originally posted by mikenap
this speculation of such huge sales forcast makes me wonder if the manufactureres know something of a new product release (like the mythical mini dvr or whatever) that could spur massive sales? These companies are pretty savy on there production estimates i'd assume, so mabe theres more to this than just the increase in sales from the Intel switch. Any thoughts?

These numbers, in the past, have come from Apple telling their third party manufactureres what to expect to ship. Apple cannot just tell them to make computers on a 1,000 or a 10,000 basis. Apple must be able to predict what sales could be so that the Chinese have some idea of what to expect. For example if it takes them 6 weeks to train a new line worker, and then another 3 months of steady work for them to be kicking out HQ product 8/5, then Apple muct tell them what they think they can expect so they can hire workers now for the heavy work loads later. Apple has also begun to talk openly about the halo effect, something they did not do early on. Apple has also said that they think that they can see the halo effect taking hold. This could be huge numbers here. More than the usual Mac heads rolling over to new kit, but add in an increasing number of converts, and then an equal number to the two previous numbers in halo effect. Gee, how many iPods and the like are there on the market? What percent is halo 5%?? 10%??, either are huge numbers that is equal to the number of macs normally sold. I think that the last tiime I heard anything from Apple was very early in the iPod life and that number was like 5% or close to that, but at that time there were not that many iPods being sold so Apple did not want to talk about numbers that were difficult enough to track. Now there are huge numbers of iPod owners and any halo effect could be big numbers for Apple.
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post #34 of 43
Quote:
Originally posted by Brendon
These numbers, in the past, have come from Apple telling their third party manufactureres what to expect to ship. Apple cannot just tell them to make computers on a 1,000 or a 10,000 basis. Apple must be able to predict what sales could be so that the Chinese have some idea of what to expect. For example if it takes them 6 weeks to train a new line worker, and then another 3 months of steady work for them to be kicking out HQ product 8/5, then Apple muct tell them what they think they can expect so they can hire workers now for the heavy work loads later. Apple has also begun to talk openly about the halo effect, something they did not do early on. Apple has also said that they think that they can see the halo effect taking hold. This could be huge numbers here. More than the usual Mac heads rolling over to new kit, but add in an increasing number of converts, and then an equal number to the two previous numbers in halo effect. Gee, how many iPods and the like are there on the market? What percent is halo 5%?? 10%??, either are huge numbers that is equal to the number of macs normally sold. I think that the last tiime I heard anything from Apple was very early in the iPod life and that number was like 5% or close to that, but at that time there were not that many iPods being sold so Apple did not want to talk about numbers that were difficult enough to track. Now there are huge numbers of iPod owners and any halo effect could be big numbers for Apple.

That's true, but this is such a big number that it makes one wonder if it is real. The most outsized number I've seen from a reliable source, so far, was 8.6 million, and that seemed way out of line. Other estimates I've seen are as low as 5.75 million.

We'll see what happens this quarter. most analysts (who also talk to the suppliers) have lowered their estimates.

Apple's low guidance for this quarter surprised everyone. If they don't seem to think the sales are up drastically, why should we? It's true that they are conservative, but now we're talking an average of 2.5 million machines per quarter. The first quarter is already gone, with about 1.250 million machines sold. This quarter seems to be lower by possibly as much as 200 thousand.

So, that means the first two quarters of the year might total 2.250-2.350 million machines.

That would leave the last two quarters of the year to give about 7.7 million sales. That's about 3.85 million machines a quarter!

Assuming that the next quarter, the April-June quarter, won't suddenly triple the sales of this quarter, but does jump to 2 million, by far, more than Apple has ever sold any quarter, that would leave the back-to school July-September quarter selling 5.7 million machines, over a million more than Apple sold all next year!

I would love to see it, but I just don't believe it. I can't see that much of a ramp up. 5.7 million machines is half of what Dell sells in a quarter. I'm not even sure that Apple could get all the chips.

If we are all floored by vastly improved sales this quarter that total upwards of 1.5 million units, then I would think that there is a chance to sell 8 million this year. But, just a chance. If sales are close to 2 million, then I can see a possibility of over 8 million. But it's slim.
post #35 of 43
Quote:
Originally posted by melgross
That's true, but this is such a big number that it makes one wonder if it is real. The most outsized number I've seen from a reliable source, so far, was 8.6 million, and that seemed way out of line. Other estimates I've seen are as low as 5.75 million.

We'll see what happens this quarter. most analysts (who also talk to the suppliers) have lowered their estimates.

Apple's low guidance for this quarter surprised everyone. If they don't seem to think the sales are up drastically, why should we? It's true that they are conservative, but now we're talking an average of 2.5 million machines per quarter. The first quarter is already gone, with about 1.250 million machines sold. This quarter seems to be lower by possibly as much as 200 thousand.

So, that means the first two quarters of the year might total 2.250-2.350 million machines.

That would leave the last two quarters of the year to give about 7.7 million sales. That's about 3.85 million machines a quarter!

Assuming that the next quarter, the April-June quarter, won't suddenly triple the sales of this quarter, but does jump to 2 million, by far, more than Apple has ever sold any quarter, that would leave the back-to school July-September quarter selling 5.7 million machines, over a million more than Apple sold all next year!

I would love to see it, but I just don't believe it. I can't see that much of a ramp up. 5.7 million machines is half of what Dell sells in a quarter. I'm not even sure that Apple could get all the chips.

If we are all floored by vastly improved sales this quarter that total upwards of 1.5 million units, then I would think that there is a chance to sell 8 million this year. But, just a chance. If sales are close to 2 million, then I can see a possibility of over 8 million. But it's slim.


For what its worth, I was in an Apple store this past weekend and it had the largest crowd I've ever seen in an Apple store. I believe there is considerable pent-up demand but how much remains to be seen.
post #36 of 43
Quote:
Originally posted by backtomac
For what its worth, I was in an Apple store this past weekend and it had the largest crowd I've ever seen in an Apple store. I believe there is considerable pent-up demand but how much remains to be seen.

You can't just look at the crowds. You have to stay a while and look at the lines at the counters, and see what people are buying.

Just like any other stores, most people come to browse.
post #37 of 43
Quote:
Originally posted by melgross
You can't just look at the crowds. You have to stay a while and look at the lines at the counters, and see what people are buying.

Just like any other stores, most people come to browse.

True. Most seemed to be looking at computers and not just iPods. I was hoping to catch a glimpse of a new Macbook Pro but they hadn't arrived yet. Surprising to me, many were looking at powerbooks. Seems to me that the old powerbooks look unappealing when the new macbook pros arrive. Maybe its just me.
post #38 of 43
Quote:
Originally posted by melgross
You can't just look at the crowds. You have to stay a while and look at the lines at the counters, and see what people are buying.

Just like any other stores, most people come to browse.

At the store here in Indy the line to the counter is always at least two lines five deep. My Cube bit the dust or at least the graphics card did so I went to get an iMac and was surprised at the long lines. When I got the computer I forgot about the printer for free deal and had to go back. Not wanting to stand in line forever I arrived before opening and waited, I was browsing at another store when Apple opened but I was only 5 or 10 minutes late. The line again was two lines five deep and the store was full, I mean full. I got the Epson stylus CX4200, one of those do everythings. Before getting hung up on the big numbers, think about how many iPods and the like there are on the market, 5% halo effect would be more than enough for Apple to make its numbers. Demand is pent up for us Mac users. My guess is that the first quarter was mostly switchers that were not paying attention to Apple HW., us Mac heads though were paying attention to and waiting for the Intel processors and to see how they ran. The pent up demand could be seen over the last year to two years in lagging Mac sales. You could see it we were all there, iPods and the like saved the day for AAPL. Now we are begining to see the halo effect of the biggest iPod year or years(2) of them all.

Oh yea I almost forgot, what would it take for everyone to buy a MacMini? 7200rpm HD and a Core Duo processor? Just about every livingroom would have one. That is the big volume item that is waiting for an update.
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post #39 of 43
Quote:
Originally posted by Brendon
At the store here in Indy the line to the counter is always at least two lines five deep. My Cube bit the dust or at least the graphics card did so I went to get an iMac and was surprised at the long lines. When I got the computer I forgot about the printer for free deal and had to go back. Not wanting to stand in line forever I arrived before opening and waited, I was browsing at another store when Apple opened but I was only 5 or 10 minutes late. The line again was two lines five deep and the store was full, I mean full. I got the Epson stylus CX4200, one of those do everythings. Before getting hung up on the big numbers, think about how many iPods and the like there are on the market, 5% halo effect would be more than enough for Apple to make its numbers. Demand is pent up for us Mac users. My guess is that the first quarter was mostly switchers that were not paying attention to Apple HW., us Mac heads though were paying attention to and waiting for the Intel processors and to see how they ran. The pent up demand could be seen over the last year to two years in lagging Mac sales. You could see it we were all there, iPods and the like saved the day for AAPL. Now we are begining to see the halo effect of the biggest iPod year or years(2) of them all.

Oh yea I almost forgot, what would it take for everyone to buy a MacMini? 7200rpm HD and a Core Duo processor? Just about every livingroom would have one. That is the big volume item that is waiting for an update.

The SoHo store here in NYC is also crazy crowded. The lines are also deep. Four counters on the main floor. Then they added two more on the second floor for iPods and accessories. Then they added two or three more on the second floor (I forget which) across from the iPod counter.

The 25,000 Sq. ft store to open in May in the GM plaza will be open 24/7.

I hope they will be selling more computers, and not mostly iPods and accessories.
post #40 of 43
Originally posted by melgross
The SoHo store here in NYC is also crazy crowded.....The 25,000 Sq. ft store to open in May in the GM plaza will be open 24/7.....I hope they will be selling more computers, and not mostly iPods and accessories.



hey i just read about that somewhere else. 24/7 Apple Store in NYC. Whoa Melgross' 2nd home?
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