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Briefly: Intel Mac mini in production; iBooks due at later date - Page 4

post #121 of 136
Quote:
Originally posted by aegisdesign
NO IT'S NOT.

Please read again and look at the graphics.

But if you want to play the exchange rate game, the price should have gone DOWN if US dollars is the baseline. We get more pounds to the dollar now than we did last year.

Here's how many pounds to the dollar ...



However, I suspect this has more to do with the Taiwan Dollar exchange rate which took a tumble at the start of this year. Apple USA seem to have absorbed it. Apple UK haven't. Or for the conspiracy theorists, Apple USA is clawing back the difference from Europe.

I'm not playing a game, and I haven't looked at the rates. It was just a suggestion.

I doubt that Apple sets their prices around the world arbitrarally.
post #122 of 136
Quote:
Originally posted by melgross
I'm not playing a game, and I haven't looked at the rates. It was just a suggestion.

I doubt that Apple sets their prices around the world arbitrarally.

Well, it seems so, because it's not based on the exchange rate. They certainly aren't as bad as they were a few years ago though when they hung on and on to much higher European prices than US. These days it's only around 10% out.

I remember working out that in 2001, for a Powerbook, I could fly to New York from London on a cheap flight, spend a romantic weekend with the girlfriend, buy a PowerBook (how romantic!) and fly back and I'd still be a few pounds up on the deal.
post #123 of 136
Quote:
Originally posted by aegisdesign
Well, it seems so, because it's not based on the exchange rate. They certainly aren't as bad as they were a few years ago though when they hung on and on to much higher European prices than US. These days it's only around 10% out.

I remember working out that in 2001, for a Powerbook, I could fly to New York from London on a cheap flight, spend a romantic weekend with the girlfriend, buy a PowerBook (how romantic!) and fly back and I'd still be a few pounds up on the deal.

Actually, that sounds pretty good to me!
post #124 of 136
Quote:
Originally posted by Mr. H
Each individual bitmap is limited to the size of the screen, but there is not just one bitmap, there are many, many bitmaps (at least one bitmap for each window + plenty of other stuff), which are then blended together by the quartz compositor to make the final scene that is sent to the display.

I suggest that you read this

Even all the (tiny) bitmaps added up don't put a dent into things. I don't think you realize how little bandwidth is used by the compositing system. I'm not going any further with this because this is officially the most pointless argument I've ever gotten caught up inI was just trying to correct a little misinformation.

Also, Siracusa can be kinda flaky from time to time. Just thinking back to that whole thing he had about how Apple was DOOMED because Objective-C's memory model wasn't sufficiently managed. ( http://arstechnica.com/staff/fatbits...5/9/27/1372/p1 ). He's interesting from time to time, but not someone to quote as gospel.
post #125 of 136
Quote:
Originally posted by gregmightdothat
Even all the (tiny) bitmaps added up don't put a dent into things. I don't think you realize how little bandwidth is used by the compositing system. I'm not going any further with this because this is officially the most pointless argument I've ever gotten caught up inI was just trying to correct a little misinformation.

Also, Siracusa can be kinda flaky from time to time. Just thinking back to that whole thing he had about how Apple was DOOMED because Objective-C's memory model wasn't sufficiently managed. ( http://arstechnica.com/staff/fatbits...5/9/27/1372/p1 ). He's interesting from time to time, but not someone to quote as gospel.

John is a recognized expert on cpu and systems design. That's where his degree is centered on. His ideas about other topics is not as expert.
post #126 of 136
Quote:
Been like that since the iMac Core Duo launch when the G5 was £899. The G5 iMac 20" is coincidentally £1049 but they've got that price right. We quite often get prices plucked out of thin air here... etc

No I don't believe it is really and truly an Apple UK issue - although perhaps they do it just to fit in...

It's more the UK rip off in general issue.
post #127 of 136
Quote:
Originally posted by gregmightdothat
Also, Siracusa can be kinda flaky from time to time. Just thinking back to that whole thing he had about how Apple was DOOMED because Objective-C's memory model wasn't sufficiently managed. ( http://arstechnica.com/staff/fatbits...5/9/27/1372/p1 ). He's interesting from time to time, but not someone to quote as gospel.

Whether Objective-C's memory model is any good or not is a matter of opinion. How Quartz 2D extreme achieves vastly better performance than standard Quartz 2D is a matter of fact.
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post #128 of 136
Quote:
Originally posted by Mr. H
Whether Objective-C's memory model is any good or not is a matter of opinion. How Quartz 2D extreme achieves vastly better performance than standard Quartz 2D is a matter of fact.

Although it doesn't actually achieve better performance over Quartz 2D all the time. My CPU (G5 1.8Ghz) is way faster than the GPU (FX5200) at rendering text and the UI with just Quartz 2D. And to me, fast text and UI is much more important than line drawing or fills.

If I could switch it on for some apps (eg. Illustrator), and off for others (eg. SubEthaEdit), that would be useful.
post #129 of 136
Quote:
Originally posted by aegisdesign
Although it doesn't actually achieve better performance over Quartz 2D all the time. My CPU (G5 1.8Ghz) is way faster than the GPU (FX5200) at rendering text and the UI with just Quartz 2D. And to me, fast text and UI is much more important than line drawing or fills.

If I could switch it on for some apps (eg. Illustrator), and off for others (eg. SubEthaEdit), that would be useful.

As I alluded to earlier, I suspect that this is because Apple are having difficulty getting QuickDraw and Quartz 2D extreme to co-exist happily.

I did use the wrong terminology, though. QuickDraw has already been deprecated (which means it is not going to see any further development), but we will probably have to wait until QuickDraw is removed from the OS before Quartz 2D extreme is worth having.
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post #130 of 136
Quote:
Originally posted by Mr. H
As I alluded to earlier, I suspect that this is because Apple are having difficulty getting QuickDraw and Quartz 2D extreme to co-exist happily.

I did use the wrong terminology, though. QuickDraw has already been deprecated (which means it is not going to see any further development), but we will probably have to wait until QuickDraw is removed from the OS before Quartz 2D extreme is worth having.

Wouldn't have thought it was Quickdraw related. SubEthaEdit is an NSTextView and completely Cocoa.

From what I gather the problem is that the GPU just isn't as quick at drawing fonts from their cached metrics as the CPU is. Since most UI elements involve text too, I'd guess that's the problem there too.

Of course, a much faster GPU would probably sort out the issue for me but that's a bit tricky in an iMac. :-)
post #131 of 136
Quote:
Originally posted by aegisdesign
Wouldn't have thought it was Quickdraw related. SubEthaEdit is an NSTextView and completely Cocoa.

Oh

I wonder if it Apple's software implementation, or if they are reaching hard limits of current GPUs?
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post #132 of 136
Quote:
Originally posted by aegisdesign
Well, it seems so, because it's not based on the exchange rate. They certainly aren't as bad as they were a few years ago though when they hung on and on to much higher European prices than US. These days it's only around 10% out.

I remember working out that in 2001, for a Powerbook, I could fly to New York from London on a cheap flight, spend a romantic weekend with the girlfriend, buy a PowerBook (how romantic!) and fly back and I'd still be a few pounds up on the deal.

I just remembered something about this. My audio company used to ship products around the world. Different areas cost us different amounts to ship. we had to had those costs into the total product cost.

It's like when you read the price of a car on the window sticker (at least here in the States. I don't know how you do it there). They have different prices depending on whether it is the price including shipping to the dealer or "delivered".
post #133 of 136
Quote:
Originally posted by melgross
I just remembered something about this. My audio company used to ship products around the world. Different areas cost us different amounts to ship. we had to had those costs into the total product cost.

Possibly, although the Intel iMac weighs less than the G5 iMac so you'd think shipping was less.

Trying to make sense of Apple UK pricing is a fruitless task.
post #134 of 136
Quote:
Originally posted by aegisdesign
Possibly, although the Intel iMac weighs less than the G5 iMac so you'd think shipping was less.

Trying to make sense of Apple UK pricing is a fruitless task.

Distance is the rule. Closer to ship to California from the Far East, than to ship to Europe.

I thought that the Intel iMac weighed almost exactly the same as the last gen G5 model. That was where they lowered the weight. When they changed the case.
post #135 of 136
so where will the new MacBooks (iBooks) will show up???
zenga
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post #136 of 136
Quote:
Originally posted by Zenga
so where will the new MacBooks (iBooks) will show up???

I guess, April 1st.
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