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Board up for re-election at Apple shareholders meeting

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 
All seven members of Apple Computer's Board of Directors have been nominated for re-election at the company's often controversial shareholders meeting, set to take place at the end of next month.

In a recent filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission, Apple announced it will hold the annual meeting on Thursday, April 27, 2006 a.m. pacific time at the Town Hall Auditorium located at Building 4 on its Cupertino, Calif. campus -- the same venue used for its most recent media event.

As part of its agenda, Apple will use the meeting to ratify the appointment of KPMG LLP as its independent auditors for the present fiscal year. It will also hold a vote to re-elect each of its seven current board members, which include Fred Anderson, William Campbell, Millard Drexler, Albert Gore, Steve Jobs, Arthur Levinson an Jerome York.

Of the seven board members, Campbell, Jobs and York have resided on the board the longest, each holding their seat since 1997.

Although the annual meeting is often perceived as rather mundane when compared to Apple's other public gatherings, it has turned into a bit of a three-ring circus in recent years.

At last year's meeting, a group of disgruntled environmentalist clamored over what they perceived to be an inadequate recycling policy offered by Apple, chastising Jobs and company for charging a fee to properly dispose of unwanted computers and iPods.

A year earlier at the 2004 shareholders meeting, resellers who charged the company with running them out of business with its own retail stores, staged a protest on the Apple campus, flailing picket signs and drawing car horns from those passing by.

As of Feb. 28, there were 851,679,185 shares of common Apple stock issued or outstanding. Each share is entitled to one vote on all matters brought before the meeting.
post #2 of 13
So I guess this means since I've shares I just might just vote to keeps Steve Jobs on the board, since he's the main reason my shares have gone up 5X in recent times!

p.s. I'm looking forward to another 5X in the next few years!
Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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post #3 of 13
Will Apple offer an audio webcast, live or delayed, for the shareholder meeting?
post #4 of 13
I like how they managed to get the inventor of the Internet Albert Gore of Clinton white house fame on their board.
post #5 of 13
Quote:
Originally posted by MacCentric
I like how they managed to get the inventor of the Internet Albert Gore of Clinton white house fame on their board.

The Internet was invented by a British guy called Tim Berners-Lee!
Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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post #6 of 13
and it was invented in CERN (swiss) in a NEXT-Step Computer...

at least a big part of the research was done on that OS...
I will buy an Apple later this year :-)
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I will buy an Apple later this year :-)
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post #7 of 13
You guys are talking about the World Wide Web. What I was referring to tounge-in-cheek was Al Gore's claim during the 2000 presidential election campaign as quoted below.

"During my service in the United States Congress, I took the initiative in creating the Internet."

http://www.wired.com/news/politics/0,1283,18390,00.html

I was just kind of trying to make a joke, one which admittedly might not be as well recognized abroad.

It is really cool especially for Jobs and co. that the web was invented on a next box.
post #8 of 13
[Deleted]
My computer can beat up your computer.
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My computer can beat up your computer.
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post #9 of 13
It's interesting that, in addition to re-electing board members, there was one item pertaining to allowing a shareholder proposal, which the directors were recommending against. Unfortunately, there were no details that I could find as to what that proposal might be.
post #10 of 13
Quote:
Originally posted by MacCentric
You guys are talking about the World Wide Web. What I was referring to tounge-in-cheek was Al Gore's claim during the 2000 presidential election campaign as quoted below.

"During my service in the United States Congress, I took the initiative in creating the Internet."

http://www.wired.com/news/politics/0,1283,18390,00.html

I was just kind of trying to make a joke, one which admittedly might not be as well recognized abroad.

It is really cool especially for Jobs and co. that the web was invented on a next box.

I invented the world wide web! Opps sorry I meant to say I just got a glass of cool milk from the fridge!
Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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post #11 of 13
Wait, I invented the Internet.

All right, the guy that did lives in my neighborhood and I know him!
"you will know the truth, and the truth will
set you free."
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"you will know the truth, and the truth will
set you free."
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post #12 of 13
Quote:
Originally posted by mark2005
Wait, I invented the Internet.

All right, the guy that did lives in my neighborhood and I know him!

You don't know me!
Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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post #13 of 13
Quote:
Originally posted by MacCentric
I like how they managed to get the inventor of the Internet Albert Gore of Clinton white house fame on their board.

I know you're joking, but Vint Cerf and Robert Kahn seem to think that he had a lot to do with it. I think it is time this joke was put to rest:

---

Al Gore and the Internet

By Robert Kahn and Vinton Cerf

Al Gore was the first political leader to recognize the importance of the Internet and to promote and support its development.

No one person or even small group of persons exclusively invented the Internet. It is the result of many years of ongoing collaboration among people in government and the university community. But as the two people who designed the basic architecture and the core protocols that make the Internet work, we would like to acknowledge VP Gores contributions as a Congressman, Senator and as Vice President. No other elected official, to our knowledge, has made a greater contribution over a longer period of time.

Last year the Vice President made a straightforward statement on his role. He said: During my service in the United States Congress I took the initiative in creating the Internet. We dont think, as some people have argued, that Gore intended to claim he invented the Internet. Moreover, there is no question in our minds that while serving as Senator, Gores initiatives had a significant and beneficial effect on the still-evolving Internet. The fact of the matter is that Gore was talking about and promoting the Internet long before most people were listening. We feel it is timely to offer our perspective.

As far back as the 1970s Congressman Gore promoted the idea of high speed telecommunications as an engine for both economic growth and the improvement of our educational system. He was the first elected official to grasp the potential of computer communications to have a broader impact than just improving the conduct of science and scholarship. Though easily forgotten, now, at the time this was an unproven and controversial concept. Our work on the Internet started in 1973 and was based on even earlier work that took place in the mid-late 1960s. But the Internet, as we know it today, was not deployed until 1983. When the Internet was still in the early stages of its deployment, Congressman Gore provided intellectual leadership by helping create the vision of the potential benefits of high speed computing and communication. As an example, he sponsored hearings on how advanced technologies might be put to use in areas like coordinating the response of government agencies to natural disasters and other crises.

As a Senator in the 1980s Gore urged government agencies to consolidate what at the time were several dozen different and unconnected networks into an Interagency Network. Working in a bi-partisan manner with officials in Ronald Reagan and George Bushs administrations, Gore secured the passage of the High Performance Computing and Communications Act in 1991. This Gore Act supported the National Research and Education Network (NREN) initiative that became one of the major vehicles for the spread of the Internet beyond the field of computer science.

As Vice President Gore promoted building the Internet both up and out, as well as releasing the Internet from the control of the government agencies that spawned it. He served as the major administration proponent for continued investment in advanced computing and networking and private sector initiatives such as Net Day. He was and is a strong proponent of extending access to the network to schools and libraries. Today, approximately 95% of our nations schools are on the Internet. Gore provided much-needed political support for the speedy privatization of the Internet when the time arrived for it to become a commercially-driven operation.

There are many factors that have contributed to the Internets rapid growth since the later 1980s, not the least of which has been political support for its privatization and continued support for research in advanced networking technology. No one in public life has been more intellectually engaged in helping to create the climate for a thriving Internet than the Vice President. Gore has been a clear champion of this effort, both in the councils of government and with the public at large.

The Vice President deserves credit for his early recognition of the value of high speed computing and communication and for his long-term and consistent articulation of the potential value of the Internet to American citizens and industry and, indeed, to the rest of the world.
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