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Apple iPhone could take a bite out of Motorola profits

post #1 of 56
Thread Starter 
Apple Computer plans to introduce its own branded multimedia cellphone, which could put a dent in Motorola's profits, according to a Barron's Online story.

As the U.S. handset leader, Motorola may be vulnerable to any new handset trend, Ken Leon, a Standard & Poor's Equity analyst, wrote in a research note sent to clients on Monday. However, Leon said he believes Motorola is ready to ship in volume its own innovative products "soon."

"We think Motorola's PBL, SLVR and Q products, along with the RAZR, will boost 2nd half [2006] sales," the analyst told investors.

Leon sees a new, more robust Motorola SLVR handset that can hold more than 500 songs as being the company's answer to any such Apple iPhone.

Recently, several Wall Street analysts have made comments that suggest an Apple-branded cell phone may soon become a reality.

In one report, released last week, analysts for PiperJaffray said they believe there is a "75 percent chance" that Apple will debut an iPhone product within the next 12 months.

According to the report in Barron's, which is causing much of today's iPhone hoopla, Apple is said to be in talks with Tiawanese-based Hon Hai over a contract that would allow it to help produce the phone.

Also known by its US trade name, Foxconn, Hon Hai is one of Apple's largest manufacturing partners, whose resume includes production services on the PowerMac G5, Mac mini, iPod and AirPort Express, among other products.

The Apple-branded phone would make a debut in the fourth quarter of the year, according to the report.
post #2 of 56
Bring it on. Can't wait to see what they can do with a phone. Hopefully it will be a little bit more than just an iTunes phone.
post #3 of 56
The phone will die a long and painful death. The large Cell Phone market is there only for those who want ot play nicely with the service providers. Most people aren't going to spend $$$ on a new cell phone, when they can get one free or for a measly $ from their carrier.

And carriers won't subsidize your phone if you don't let them disable a boatload of features that they can then turn around and charge for, like downloading music, dumping stuff to/from the computer, etc.

Hell, just look at Motorola. They could only get Cingular to carry their iTunes music phones...
post #4 of 56
Yeah I'm not too interested in dealing with the Wireless Gestapo. I hope someday VOIP over Wireless WAN eats into their sales something fierce.
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post #5 of 56
Cell phones have all the earmarks of something Apple could do much better than others ... if they tackled some of the outstanding issues.

Cell phone that used cell service when out and about but also, at home connects to land-line by acting as a cordless phone to a base station so you could pick up land-line calls (perhaps using wi-fi for greater range?).

Complete Addressbook integration with all labels, all phone #s preserved, ability to use groups (unlike on iPod today) to browse. Automatic group by company names so can look up by company as well person. unlimited number of names and addresses (except as memory limited). Easily get other numbers of person recently called or who called you, not just the one used.

Comfortable headset with good mic that could switch between music and calls easily. Or switch to car speakers.

Ability to sync Filemaker databases to phone/iPod.
post #6 of 56
I think whatever they release, it will integrate seamlessly with the Mac OS, offering a cell phone experience akin to the iPod experience which has proven to be such a big success. That's the best way for Apple to improve upon cell phones already out there. Make it work well with a computer OS, something that motorola and company simply don't have the ability to do.
post #7 of 56
If it works by Apple logic, it will be a great product with an excellent, simple interface.

Hopefully, it will also be dynamic and function more like a PDA with touchscreen (already speculated to be on new iPods), iSight, Java or other environment, etc. Basically Mac OS X Mobile. Safari and Mail mobile included with full syncing. They could incorporate the service into .Mac. For example, you could access a file on your iDisk and view it or sync to the computer without requiring you to ever connect the device to your computer. I realize that this isn't exactly an original idea, but you know Apple will do it better and they'll have my order.

willNeuhauser: We could then have FileMaker Mobile on our Mac Mobile with unilmited range server access!
post #8 of 56
I'll buy one
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post #9 of 56
Quote:
Originally posted by willNeuhauser
Cell phones have all the earmarks of something Apple could do much better than others ... if they tackled some of the outstanding issues.

Cell phone that used cell service when out and about but also, at home connects to land-line by acting as a cordless phone to a base station so you could pick up land-line calls (perhaps using wi-fi for greater range?).

Complete Addressbook integration with all labels, all phone #s preserved, ability to use groups (unlike on iPod today) to browse. Automatic group by company names so can look up by company as well person. unlimited number of names and addresses (except as memory limited). Easily get other numbers of person recently called or who called you, not just the one used.

Comfortable headset with good mic that could switch between music and calls easily. Or switch to car speakers.

Ability to sync Filemaker databases to phone/iPod.

Agree. A me to product won't fly.
post #10 of 56
Quote:
Originally posted by Louzer
The phone will die a long and painful death. The large Cell Phone market is there only for those who want ot play nicely with the service providers. Most people aren't going to spend $$$ on a new cell phone, when they can get one free or for a measly $ from their carrier.

And carriers won't subsidize your phone if you don't let them disable a boatload of features that they can then turn around and charge for, like downloading music, dumping stuff to/from the computer, etc.

Ah, America.

Perhaps, for once, Apple will realise Europe offers them a better and more technically advanced market and release there first.

Quote:
Originally posted by Louzer
Hell, just look at Motorola. They could only get Cingular to carry their iTunes music phones...

Perhaps the others didn't want to be associated with such a shit phone.
post #11 of 56
Quote:
Originally posted by willNeuhauser
Cell phones have all the earmarks of something Apple could do much better than others ... if they tackled some of the outstanding issues.

Cell phone that used cell service when out and about but also, at home connects to land-line by acting as a cordless phone to a base station so you could pick up land-line calls (perhaps using wi-fi for greater range?).

Complete Addressbook integration with all labels, all phone #s preserved, ability to use groups (unlike on iPod today) to browse. Automatic group by company names so can look up by company as well person. unlimited number of names and addresses (except as memory limited). Easily get other numbers of person recently called or who called you, not just the one used.

Comfortable headset with good mic that could switch between music and calls easily. Or switch to car speakers.

Ability to sync Filemaker databases to phone/iPod.

Apart from groups in iSync (and that's an Apple issue) and Filemaker export (again Apple), Symbian phones from Nokia and Sony Ericsson do all the above.
post #12 of 56
Quote:
Originally posted by AppleInsider
Apple Computer plans to introduce its own branded multimedia cellphone, which could put a dent in Motorola's profits, according to a Barron's Online story.

I've been waiting SO long for Apple to introduce it's iPhone.... In fact I've held off buying a phone ever since I saw that Apple registered the iphone.org domain name back in 1999. So come on Apple release the iPhone already, I've got a TON of calls I gotta make and I ain't getting any younger!!!

Dave
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post #13 of 56
apple doesnt do new markets, or full markets they say so themselves, however they do go into evolving markets which is where i think they should enter the cell phone market.

The iPod didnt create a new market, apple entered the market of personal music players when it was transitioning to mp3.

I think that apple should make an iPod which has the added feture of being able to communcate with other ipod for free with voip over wifi when you are in range (and if they were feeling really nice they could put an iSight in there for video aswell, but that may not be possible at this time). This approcah would definately make them a major player as this communication technology advances, as all the people who have ipods can call all their friends who have ipods.
A third party could make some kind of accessory that allowed you to use the phone as a normal cell, but i dont think apple should do this. Meanwhile as wifi coverage and voip grows people will have a device with this feature they can use more and more for free. From my point of view (as a student) it will be awesome as i could call my friends who have wifi for free at home, in college, i could call my family for free. It would be awesome.

stu

edit: this would also prevent problems with the carriers as apple just wouldnt be dealing with them.
The only problem i can really see yould be the current lack of coverage for wifi, but for when you are at home and college this would be a great solution imo!
post #14 of 56
Apple branded MVNO (virtual carrier aka virgin mobile) +
DRM system (fairplay) +
BRAND (millions of loyal users both mac and ipod) +
CONTENT (hollywood, video, music, etc) +
BILLING SYSTEM (already have subscriber billing info from iTunes) +
PHONE (handset, perhaps OEM from Samsung--apple designed with
patent design) +
SERVICES (.mac, etc) =
HUGE SUCCESS

If you think iPod market is big, the mobile smart phone is ENORMOUS.

This would be HUGE. Let's also not forget Disney which is also creat MVNO and Jobs is board member.

http://www.tangentmobile.com has an article on this.
post #15 of 56
I don't see Apple bringing out a phone just to compete in the handset market. Apple is either (1) taking a big gamble that mobile phones will eventually eat up a big piece of the MP3 player market and getting in while phones and MP3 players are still largely separate markets, (2) Apple is about to buy a wireless carrier, or (3) Apple is about to set up its own virtual wireless company.

No. 1 seems to safe for a company that basically re-created the MP3 market from the much smaller market that was already there.

No. 2 would take enormous balls and a lot of money. Cingular, Sprint Nextel, Verizon Wireless and T-Mobile are all enormous companies with lots of entanglements. Apple could acquire a small or regional carrier like SunCom and grow from there.

No. 3 is the Virgin Mobile model, and that seems the most likely reason for Apple get into the mobile marketplace. It's a much more cost effective entree than trying to swallow a huge carrier, and it gives Apple control of every customer from the first day.
post #16 of 56
I applaud any opportunity Apple gets to kick Motorola in the balls.

Had Motorola put a concerted effort into PowerPC chips around the time OS X debuted, the Mac could have garnered a lot of marketshare with machines that ran on a secure system during Microsoft's inability and unwillingness to deal with the insecurity of its own OS. But, nooooooooo, those jerks at Moto let the G4 chip fester at a measly 1.42 GHz for ages while Intel and AMD rocketed ahead.

All current cell phones have pathetic UI's. You need to carry around the manual to execute all but the most basic functions. Most users are afraid to use many of the cool features of their phones because they are such a hassle. If Apple applied its UI experience to cell phones, they could replicate the iPod phenomenon.

And if Apple pulls that off, IBM ought to consider investing in a cup; their scrotum looks a lot like a soccer ball to Mac fans. Low-power G5 chip "someday" -- ptui!
post #17 of 56
Someone touched on it already. Apple could make the phone link effortlessly/automatically via bluetooth with address book, but they wouldn't want to stop there, they could do the same with Mail and iCal. That would be a great way to sell these phones to Mac users, just like Apple did when the iPod first came out.

Apple could do the same thing they did to expand the iPod market to the pc world. Port iTunes, or in this case Address Book & Mail & iCal to the pc.

This would give pc users who are curious, another example of apples software and hardware integration. It could have a halo effect like the iPod, and be another way to bring more pc users over to the mac.

I'm not arguing that they will do this, or should, so don't complain to me. I'm just speculating about what they might do.
post #18 of 56
Quote:
Most people aren't going to spend $$$ on a new cell phone, when they can get one free or for a measly $ from their carrier.

I agree its difficult to see Apple being successful in the current cell phone market. Apple will have to do something radically different.

The only way I can also see this working is by Apple selling the hardware with access to free or extremely low cost service.
post #19 of 56
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post #20 of 56
The trouble with being an MVNO is that if you're actually successful, the carrier whose business you're cutting into takes your coverage away.

If Apple is content with being a "boutique" cell service provider, ala Virgin, I suppose they could do some small scale roll out.

But they cannot, and can never possibly, compete with the vast infrastructure deployment of the big telcom operators; nor can they, as Louzer so expertly summed up, expect to make some kind of killer handset and get it offered by the big operators. The big operators are absolutely obsessed with squeezing every dime out of a closed system of ring tones, wallpapers, music, video and data services. They will simply never offer an Apple handset that moves that functionality to Apple, which is the whole point of an Apple handset in the first place. Never. Never. Never.

So that leaves their options somewhat limited. A cell style VoIP handset is certainly something different, but I'm don't see how, with the ubiquity of cell phones, there is any value added there, unless they can price it significantly lower, and even then, unless you can get WiFi everywhere you can get cell reception, it would count as an additional monthly charge to duplicate what your cell already does, which is a tough sell, to say the least.

Their only hope of "cutting into Motorola's sales" (which I think is patently ridiculous, given the reasons above) is to get one of the smaller service providers to pretty much hand over the download and data services part of the offering to Apple, in the hopes that being the "official iTunes/Apple cell phone company" will make a smaller carrier less small.
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post #21 of 56
I'd much rather give my cell dollars to Apple than Cingular, Moto, and the like. The iPod interface is simple, speedy, and extensible, and I far prefer it to the clunky, slow interface on my Motorola phone. There's a few things Apple would need to work out but I'm confident they'd do a good job, and versions 2, 3, and 4 will only be better.

I don't see replacing my phone for another year or so, but by then hopefully Apple kit will be out.
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post #22 of 56
Quote:
Originally posted by Xool
I'd much rather give my cell dollars to Apple than Cingular, Moto, and the like. The iPod interface is simple, speedy, and extensible, and I far prefer it to the clunky, slow interface on my Motorola phone. There's a few things Apple would need to work out but I'm confident they'd do a good job, and versions 2, 3, and 4 will only be better.

I don't see replacing my phone for another year or so, but by then hopefully Apple kit will be out.

Yes, I would like that too, and I have no doubt that Apple could build a very nice phone with a very nice interface with some really sweet integration, but how do you see Apple overcoming the barriers to entry in this market?
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post #23 of 56
Quote:
Originally posted by addabox
The trouble with being an MVNO is that if you're actually successful, the carrier whose business you're cutting into takes your coverage away.

Has this happened? Wouldn't there be contract terms that would prevent this?

Either way, the carrier is making money, either directly or indirectly.
post #24 of 56
Cant believe all this rediculous hype about an iPhone or whatever you want to call it. Nothing more than speculation and rumors.
post #25 of 56
Quote:
Originally posted by rinnin
Cant believe all this rediculous hype about an iPhone or whatever you want to call it. Nothing more than speculation and rumors.

They don't call it a rumor mill for nothing.

On topic, I wonder how an iPhone would affect the iPod (an apple product which actually exists). There have been discussions on this board about how smart phones and the like threaten the iPod's dominance as a music player, though I don't think they are particularly valid. What's different here is the apple design being thrown into both contenders. There's a good chance they'd share quality and interface elements, and be similar in a number of other ways (click wheel perhaps).

If Apple nails the market with this phone (which I assume would require multimedia functionality), then where's the iPod brand going to go? This is especially problematic for the nano which probably has about the same song capacity as a potential iPhone. With a music (very) capable iPhone, why bother with a Nano?

It just seems like Apple would have to pit its product lines up against each other to enter the phone market. I imagine that in the long run this would hurt both.
post #26 of 56
This seems to me a bit of irresponsible speculation on the effects of what seems to be a chronically erroneous bit of speculation; which is not to say that Apple won't introduce a phone, but it's been predicted many times in the past and many times the prediction has not born fruit.

What I would love to see, however, is Apple releasing a non-subsidized carrier independent GSM phone. So for $400 or so you get an Apple phone based one the capability level of say an iPod Nano plus some basic smart phone capability, integrated well into Apple's iApps. I'm a bit skeptical about that solution, however, since the majority of the market will be using MS Outlook/etc. and Apple will need to come up with either a PC sync solution (not their druthers I'd imagine) or PC equivalents of their iApps (also difficult since it'll require migration on the part of PC users; which means it'll need to be much more enticing than Outlook, and integrate as well or better with the rest of the MS suite/OS).

The one thing Apple would have going or it in this scenario would be the promise of untied handsets; and thus the feeling of freedom to let Cingular and T-Mobile compete unfettered by contract/handset tie-in, and it also means no crippled handset functionality. Getting to far into bed with one particular carrier is a dangerous proposition for Apple and their brand identity, since it can really only serve to fracture their market and inevitably decrease the value of their brand, potentially by a great deal. People that don't like their cell carrier tend to really hate their cell carrier, and those that like their carrier tend to suffer their existence, more than actually like them.
post #27 of 56
Quote:
Originally posted by JeffDM
Has this happened?

Dunno, I doubt it, if only because I don't think anyone has made enough of a business of leasing carrier space to cut into the lessees action.

Quote:
Wouldn't there be contract terms that would prevent this?

Probably, but I doubt contracts are being written with any kind of serious, as in "interfere with the lessees ability to provide services", amount of use in mind. It's just common sense that if Apple made a killer phone and sold enough of them to actually pose a threat to Motorola, that that would represent sufficient bandwidth to be a problem for whoever they might be leasing from, not to mention actual competition.

Quote:
Either way, the carrier is making money, either directly or indirectly.

Sure, but making money by leasing space to a boutique operator with a tiny user base is one thing, leasing space to a competitor who is cutting into your lucrative cash cow of for-pay downloads and data services is another. I don't think it's possible to overestimate how seriously the cell companies take the idea that they are the rightful gatekeepers of "content on demand everywhere always". It bodes to be a vastly more lucrative business than simple voice services, and if it looks like Apple is getting a toehold on that synergy, like they've taken charge of digital music downloads, there isn't a cell carrier in existence that wouldn't cut them off at the knees at their first opportunity.

The irony is that this all applies only if Apple offers a cell phone which is hugely successful, like iPod successful. If they have a little niche cell phone business like Virgin Mobile, no worries, but why bother?

The way things are set up now, if Apple makes a popular cell phone they loose, because it triggers a reaction from the big guys, and if they offer a non-popular cell phone they loose because it's, you know, non-popular.

For all the people rhapsodizing about how cool a cell Apple could make, I don't doubt it, but I still haven't seen a persuasive explanation of how they get such an item hooked into nation-wide coverage on their own, or carried by the big service providers if not.
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post #28 of 56
Quote:
Originally posted by ChevalierMalFet
.....

The one thing Apple would have going or it in this scenario would be the promise of untied handsets; and thus the feeling of freedom to let Cingular and T-Mobile compete unfettered by contract/handset tie-in, and it also means no crippled handset functionality. Getting to far into bed with one particular carrier is a dangerous proposition for Apple and their brand identity, since it can really only serve to fracture their market and inevitably decrease the value of their brand, potentially by a great deal. People that don't like their cell carrier tend to really hate their cell carrier, and those that like their carrier tend to suffer their existence, more than actually like them.

This is interesting to me, but I'm not sure how it works. Can I walk into Verizon and say "sign me up, but I'll be using my own phone, thanks?" And what if "my own phone" offers functionality that takes money out of Verizon's pocket, such as easy transfer of ringtones and wall paper from a Mac (instead of having to purchase those things from Verizon, which is what they want you to do)? Will Verizon actually support such a handset?

Are there laws regarding this?
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post #29 of 56
There are laws supporting this; in fact if you go to Cingular of T-Mobile and request your phone be unlocked I believe they must do it. However, it only really works for GSM phones reliably since that is the only setup that specifies a phone must use a SIM card. Nextel's service did as well, but they use iDen for transmission and as far as I know are the only ones who do, so it doesn't do you any good. Verizon, likewise, uses CDMA which does not require the use of SIM cards, and as such Verizon has its customers by the balls (as does Sprint and any other CDMA/TDMA provider).

Currently the two major US providers on GSM are Cingular and T-Mobilewhich is admittedly a choice between Cingular's larger, more advanced network (much better coverage than T-Mobile if you use a quad-band phone) and T-Mobile's less covered network but much better pricing structure. Cingular seems to be very fond of the nickel and dime scheme of little fees everywhere for everything.

An added bonus of an unlocked GSM phone is if you ever go on vacation somewhere you can buy a local service SIM card and some minutes for relatively cheap, and I've found nearly invariably that foreign cell service is absurdly cheaper than it is in the US (we truly are getting the shaft on this one).

And yes, I switched to Cingular from T-Mobile using my unlocked RAZR and I basically said "Hey, I'd like a SIM I've got my own phone thanks." I also put my own wallpapers on my phone over bluetoothI could do the same with ring tones but I leave my phone on vibrate.
post #30 of 56
Quote:
Originally posted by ChevalierMalFet
People that don't like their cell carrier tend to really hate their cell carrier, and those that like their carrier tend to suffer their existence, more than actually like them.

This may explain the attraction that Apple has to the wireless carriers. How can they inject appeal to their products? How can they get people to switch carriers? An iPhone that is different may be what carriers need to differentiate themselves from their competitors. Yes Apple has some risk in partnering with a wireless carrier, but potentially could leverage new users to the mac platform a la iPod if done correctly. IMO Apple needs a new peripheral product that integrates with the Mac like the iPod. This can attract new users to the mac platform.
post #31 of 56
Everyone please STOP making a connection to old school "CELL" companies, Apple just won't go in that direction. CELLS are dead for all practical purposes. It's a dying industry, Apple just hasn't played their cards to finally kill it... "yet"...

Some real food for thought:

IP is where EVERYTHING is going, Apple has the highest percentage of wireless enabled users in the World, thus a Wireless IP Phone similar to what Netgear is about to announce is where this is all heading. NOT CELL PHONES! The below link is similar to what Apple is working on, you can bank on it...

http://tools.netgear.com/skype/

Apple owns all of the Class A Address Space of "17", so they could easily run a huge IP Phone System just from that asset alone. (or just the iChat/AOL naming conventions)

All Apple has to do is announce an Apple IP Phone ($299) that works seamlessly with/or without an Apple Basestation $99 and game is over. This will cause a massive implosion in Cells phones, since "unlimited world wide talk time" will suddenly be "FREE". At the very same time it will cause a massive explosion of Apple IP Phones and basestations since there will be a mad rush to blanket the planet with these "FREE" zones, to use these "FREE" talk time Apple IP Phones.

Throw in Intel's WiMax (802.16)... And it's a done deal.

Do it Apple, you MUST make Skype, the next "Rio"...

Lastly, Apple "pre roots", were based on "Free" phone calls, so perhaps on April 1st, Apple can make this all come full circle
post #32 of 56
Until you realize that your IP phone now doesn't work in 90% of the places you really want to use it. At best IP telephony is ready for handing off to IP networks when available, and falling back on traditional cell when you are outside of that range.

We are probably seeing a decade long dying breath of cell carriers as they once were, and their resignation to a Power Company like utility commodity, but they are going to fight tooth and nail on the way there. All of the infrastructure folks will, as modularization makes them commodities (more so than they already are).
post #33 of 56
Quote:
Originally posted by OS11
Everyone please STOP making a connection to old school "CELL" companies, Apple just won't go in that direction. CELLS are dead for all practical purposes. It's a dying industry, Apple just hasn't played their cards to finally kill it... "yet"...

That is a joke of a claim. There are estimates of two billion cell phones in use. That would be a huge and expensive installed base infrastructure to simply obsolete, it's not likely to happen. Installed base is more significant than questions about whether something is obsolete, it is an incredible momentum to fight against.

Quote:
Some real food for thought:

IP is where EVERYTHING is going, Apple has the highest percentage of wireless enabled users in the World, thus a Wireless IP Phone similar to what Netgear is about to announce is where this is all heading. NOT CELL PHONES! The below link is similar to what Apple is working on, you can bank on it...

IP, maybe, but it won't be IPv4. It would be impossible to put all current cell phone users on the current IPv4 system.

Quote:
http://tools.netgear.com/skype/

Apple owns all of the Class A Address Space of "17", so they could easily run a huge IP Phone System just from that asset alone. (or just the iChat/AOL naming conventions)

Throw in Intel's WiMax (802.16)... And it's a done deal.

Apple doesn't have enough IP addresses to do what you propose. A class 'A' is "only" 16 million IP addresses, there are about 3x more iPods than that, Apple sold 14M in '05Q4. Then there's the issue of routing, especially if you connect to a non-Apple subnet. I'm not sure an IP-based system can handle mobile use where one would switch subnets many times a day. My understanding is that cell phones with IP capabilities more or less tunnel over the cellular data network.

I'm not sure if WiMax has been proven yet, particularly for mobile use. Even if it is, a WiMax carrier would just be a repainted cellular carrier because they probably would have to put up just as many towers or attach to existing cellular towers, basically becomming yet another cellular network.
post #34 of 56
My ages old Nokia candybar phone has been waiting for an Apple cell phone (or...?) to replace it...
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post #35 of 56
Quote:
Originally posted by JeffDM
That is a joke of a claim. There are estimates of two billion cell phones in use. That would be a huge and expensive installed base infrastructure to simply obsolete, it's not likely to happen. Installed base is more significant than questions about whether something is obsolete, it is an incredible momentum to fight against.


There are not 2 billion cell phones in "use", far less than a billion. You mean 2 billion have been made since the 60's. It's hard to compete against "free". CELL companies will die because of this, just watch. I fully understand they won't disappear overnight, but Apple could inherit the "wealth" of most all cell companies if they do it.

Okay about the IP / Class A, the current iChat/AOL screen name method will be fine.
post #36 of 56
As appealing as this fantasy scenario is to me (and obviously to others) I think I'd be very suprised by Apple getting into wireless service at this point. The phone maybe... but they had better buy T-Mobile or something if they really want to make a mark at this point. The industry is very mature now and fragmented among all the minor players.

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post #37 of 56
i dont care what everybody will say but im really excited for this iPhone!!!!!
post #38 of 56
Quote:
Originally posted by thumbelina
i dont care what everybody will say but im really excited for this iPhone!!!!!

What iPhone? There is none! Where's the proof or even rumors from "very reliable sources?" Nowhere. Get a grip people. God
post #39 of 56
I can see it now. Sort of like the UPS commercial:

You have a camera phone... They have a camera phone.

You have nation wide roaming plan... They have nation wide roaming plan.

You have an add agency... They have an add agency.

You have an Apple iPhone... They have a new add agency.
post #40 of 56
So, really, does anybody have any plausible ideas about how Apple would get into the cell phone business?

Sure, they could make a standard issue handset with a better interface and leave it at that, but is that what we're looking for?

Because there are really good reasons, that I and a number of others have laid out, for why anything more than that really wouldn't work, short of Apple deploying its own nationwide network of cell towers and switching infrastructure.

So the debate keeps going back and forth between "cogent reasons why Apple would face enormous obstacles breaking into the cell market" and "man, an Apple cell phone would be so awsome, I want an Apple cell phone". Which isn't really a debate.

So, again: anybody got a scenario that lets Apple make a cell phone that does something more than organize the usual cell phone functions in a better way (which is fine, so far as it goes) which you can actually use (as in, make and receive calls everywhere your current cell phone can)?

The only one I can see is for Apple to become an MVNO, which right there puts a limit on how successful such a product can really be.
They spoke of the sayings and doings of their commander, the grand duke, and told stories of his kindness and irascibility.
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They spoke of the sayings and doings of their commander, the grand duke, and told stories of his kindness and irascibility.
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