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The Intel Powermac / Powermac Conroe / Mac Pro thread - Page 18

post #681 of 947
Quote:
Originally posted by mwswami
I just configured a dual dual-core Xeon Dell 490 Precision Workstation for little over $2000. It includes 2 3.2 GHz Dempsey Xeons, 1Gb memory, nVidia Quadro NVS 285 (2DVIs), 16X DVD+/-RW, 250GB SATA hard drive and Windows XP Pro. You should be able to configure 2 Woodcrest 5130s (2GHz, $315 each) or 5140s (2.33GHz) for similar price after the 26th.

Apple current low end PowerMac is priced at $1999 with 512Mb RAM, 160Gb drive, and NVIDIA GeForce 6600 LE but with only 2 cores. I am really hoping that Apple will be able to offer a machine similar in hardware specs to Dell's (with 2 5130s) for about $2199.

I need/want the machine for Java Programming. Since Apple support for Java always lags behind Solaris, Linux, and Windows (no JSE 1.6 betas yet on Apple), I may be forced to buy a Dell with Linux instead. I have plenty of Macs though including a dual 2.5G5 PowerMac, 2 XServers, and a Intel Mini and a MBP to keep me happy ....

Don't count on it. Apple has never been competitive on prices..... ESPECIALLY with Dell.

 

 

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post #682 of 947
Quote:
Originally posted by emig647
Don't count on it. Apple has never been competitive on prices..... ESPECIALLY with Dell.

Yeah I expect Apple will have about a %15-20 premium over what you'd pay for Dell.
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post #683 of 947
Quote:
Originally posted by mwswami
I need/want the machine for Java Programming. Since Apple support for Java always lags behind Solaris, Linux, and Windows (no JSE 1.6 betas yet on Apple), I may be forced to buy a Dell with Linux instead. I have plenty of Macs though including a dual 2.5G5 PowerMac, 2 XServers, and a Intel Mini and a MBP to keep me happy ....

Why a Dell? Dell is like the KMart of the computer world. Why not just build your own or buy something with a bit better reputation?

 

 

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The reason why they are analysts is because they failed at running businesses.

 

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post #684 of 947
Quote:
Originally posted by emig647
Why a Dell? Dell is like the KMart of the computer world. Why not just build your own or buy something with a bit better reputation?

Because I have had good experience with them and the machines are cheap. Also, you can't do much better (price and features) if you build the machine yourself and then there is the hardware support issue .... things do fail and it's better to have someone else take care of it ...
post #685 of 947
Quote:
Originally posted by mwswami
Because I have had good experience with them and the machines are cheap. Also, you can't do much better (price and features) if you build the machine yourself and then there is the hardware support issue .... things do fail and it's better to have someone else take care of it ...

What about bootcamp? Sorry, not trying to be contrary, just asking.
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post #686 of 947
Quote:
Originally posted by Flounder
What about bootcamp? Sorry, not trying to be contrary, just asking.

Thanks, I haven't tried out bootcamp or Parallels yet. I don't have any WinXP Pro SP2 disc lying around. Also I prefer Linux instead of Windows. I don't believe bootcamp supports Linux.

I may change my mind once I see the new Apple Mac Pro but for now it seems I can get all the same components (CPU, Graphics, Memory, even Motherboard) for probably $500-$1000 cheaper if I choose Dell. This estimate is for a $2800 Dell machine with 4GB RAM and 2x 250GB SATA drives and 3 yr on-site next day hardware support. Sure I won't be able to run Mac OS X on it but I do have the new Mac Mini and the MBP for that ....

Another thing that is important to me is replace-ability of the CPUs. 6-8 months down the road when Clovertown is out, I would like to have the option to replace the Woodcrests with Clovertowns and get double the number of cores. Given that AMD and Intel are competing fiercely, Clovertown might get priced similar to the current pricing of Woodcrest. Somehow I think this upgrading will be more possible with the Dell Workstation than the Apple Mac Pro.
post #687 of 947
Quote:
Originally posted by mwswami
Thanks, I haven't tried out bootcamp or Parallels yet. I don't have any WinXP Pro SP2 disc lying around. Also I prefer Linux instead of Windows. I don't believe bootcamp supports Linux.

I may change my mind once I see the new Apple Mac Pro but for now it seems I can get all the same components (CPU, Graphics, Memory, even Motherboard) for probably $500-$1000 cheaper if I choose Dell. This estimate is for a $2800 Dell machine with 4GB RAM and 2x 250GB SATA drives and 3 yr on-site next day hardware support. Sure I won't be able to run Mac OS X on it but I do have the new Mac Mini and the MBP for that ....

Another thing that is important to me is replace-ability of the CPUs. 6-8 months down the road when Clovertown is out, I would like to have the option to replace the Woodcrests with Clovertowns and get double the number of cores. Given that AMD and Intel are competing fiercely, Clovertown might get priced similar to the current pricing of Woodcrest. Somehow I think this upgrading will be more possible with the Dell Workstation than the Apple Mac Pro.

Parallels does support Linux and for the cost it may be worth it. Please post your experiance here if you decide to do Linux/Parallels. I use XP/Parallels and all is fine there no problems (@1.5gig ), but I'm on the learning curve.
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post #688 of 947
Quote:
Originally posted by mwswami
Thanks, I haven't tried out bootcamp or Parallels yet. I don't have any WinXP Pro SP2 disc lying around. Also I prefer Linux instead of Windows. I don't believe bootcamp supports Linux.

Yah you can use BootCamp to boot linux: BootCamp boots linux too

And what you said about hardware support, when you build a DYI machine you have BETTER support IMO than any tech support guy who reads off of a document will ever give you. Last year I built a system with an Asus motherboard (one of their first LGA775 boards) and received awesome tech support. But besides that you can usually get away with better warranties directly from the manufacturer of parts than from dell. But that's just me... i'd rather have a computer that I built just for me instead of one that was mass produced with inferior parts for everyone. (And yes Dell does run inferior / cheap parts... especially power supplies).

 

 

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post #689 of 947
Quote:
Originally posted by Brendon
Parallels does support Linux and for the cost it may be worth it. Please post your experiance here if you decide to do Linux/Parallels. I use XP/Parallels and all is fine there no problems (@1.5gig ), but I'm on the learning curve.

Just read the Parallels FAQ . The current release does not support SMP inside the guest OS. That's a non-starter for me but I think once they do, I will give it a serious consideration.
post #690 of 947
Quote:
Originally posted by emig647
Yah you can use BootCamp to boot linux: BootCamp boots linux too

And what you said about hardware support, when you build a DYI machine you have BETTER support IMO than any tech support guy who reads off of a document will ever give you. Last year I built a system with an Asus motherboard (one of their first LGA775 boards) and received awesome tech support. But besides that you can usually get away with better warranties directly from the manufacturer of parts than from dell. But that's just me... i'd rather have a computer that I built just for me instead of one that was mass produced with inferior parts for everyone. (And yes Dell does run inferior / cheap parts... especially power supplies).

If you have a couple of machines it is easy to build/support/upgrade them yourself but I have too many of them. I would rather focus on my work and pay someone else to take care of any problems (specially hardware ones, I can usually manage any software issues). It is possible Dell uses cheap parts but my experience (other than their 1U Servers being really loud ) has been acceptable. In contrast, my recent experience with Apple hardware hasn't been too exemplary.
  • XServe dual G5 - died right after 1 yr. warranty expired. I didn't buy Applecare because it sells for a whopping $999 and Apple wouldn't fix it.

    Wife's iMac G5 - bad firewire port - damaged a couple of iPods.

    Powerbook - screen with ghost images; malfunctioning external DVI port; latch not working after extended use

    Intel Mac Mini - doesn't work at 1920x1080 resolution (static across the screen)

    Macbook Pro - runs too hot ; maybe getting the 7200 rpm disk was a mistake
Sorry for the laundry list but I really felt like venting.

Other than these issues, I have totally loved these and other Apple products over the years. I am usually among the first to buy most (didn't get the iPod leather case ) things that Apple comes out with. I have been to a few WWDCs and also own some Apple stock. I am eagerly looking forward to the new Mac Pros, XServes, iPods, media center etc ....:
post #691 of 947
Quote:
Other than these issues, I have totally loved these and other Apple products over the years. I am usually among the first to buy most (didn't get the iPod leather case ) things that Apple comes out with.

If I were you, I'd be the last to buy new Apple products. Apple's famous amongst Mac users for flawed rev. A gear, which you exemplify I'm on a 4th gen TiBook and have had no problems whatsoever.
post #692 of 947
Quote:
Originally posted by 1337_5L4Xx0R
If I were you, I'd be the last to buy new Apple products. Apple's famous amongst Mac users for flawed rev. A gear, which you exemplify I'm on a 4th gen TiBook and have had no problems whatsoever.

Not true. Every computer manufacturer has trouble with a low percentage of their products no matter what Rev. I have had all Rev A PowerMacs, and one Rev A PowerBook, and never had a problem. You never see the people that have no problems with their machines on line. All you ever see is the unlucky few that start complaining when luch has struck them badly.
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post #693 of 947
Quote:
Originally posted by 1337_5L4Xx0R
If I were you, I'd be the last to buy new Apple products. Apple's famous amongst Mac users for flawed rev. A gear, which you exemplify I'm on a 4th gen TiBook and have had no problems whatsoever.

Apple's rev A is no more likely to have a problem that anyone else's rev A product. Possibly less. Apple is a very visible company however, and every flaw is given plenty of press. Apple users are also more whiney than most, and complain about every little problem that most users of other equipment wouldn't even think about.

I generally give a month or so before ordering a new model. I do that with everything. I wait for feedback from the early adopters. If everything seems fine, I will buy in a couple of weeks, if not, I wait for two or three weeks more. There isn't really a rush.

I bought a Trio 700p Friday. I could have bought it when it first came out, but I wanted to read several reviews, and read the feedback on the forums first. That's the best way. Read Macintouch.com, and Macfixit.com for a couple of weeks to see what the problems are, if any. I do that with upgrades and updates as well, though usually, after one week, you will get enough information.
post #694 of 947
SHAKE price dropped to $499

It looks like we needn't worry too much about the Apple workstation. Apple just lowered the price of industry leading shake to $499.00, which a few years ago, before they were purchased by Apple was like $10,000. This move alone in my mind says they are going to offer a workstations aimed at the large studios, which already have Macs using shake, and smaller ones that can now afford this higher quality production application. Apple has more going for them now, especially in the pro workstation department than any manufacturer IMO especially with bootcamp, in case anyone still has any dependancy on windows applications. This also IMM says that once bigger studios start using more Macs there will be more developers who's applications will have to be ported due to studio requests, and the mass amounts of user requests that they already get. Such as SOFTIMAGE who's XSI application is right behind Maya as a favorite in movie production 3D, and has been submitted petitions by an enormous amount of Mac users wanting to use their Applications.

All I can say is this looks like Apple is making a huge push in the movie industry were workstations play a major role. Being that you can now use a Mac to edit your movie no matter what Application your using because of bootcamp, and you could also have your whole digital effects department running on Macs there will be deep discounts to be applied across the board for bigger purchases. This could be a brilliant move by Apple right now especially being that Steve Jobs is personally involved, and they are already in negotiations with Hollywood studios over movies for the ITMS.
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post #695 of 947
Thread Starter 
Holy shit, wow, I thought they meant they dropped the price $450, not that it is now $450. Jesus christ, that is Lord of the Rings tech for less than Microsoft Office.
post #696 of 947
Yeah, Apple could really run a great promotion if you could get Shake, FC Express, all the iLife stuff, a Quad-core Mac Pro with a decent amount of RAM, and a 20 inch monitor for $4000 or so. The "amateur filmmaker's package" could get a lot of people interested, especially now that we seem to be moving to a system where anyone can produce content.
post #697 of 947

Where, oh where, can my Mac Pro be?
Apple has not yet given her to me.
She's going to be heavenly, so I've got to be good
So I can see this tower when it gets unfurled.
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post #698 of 947
Quote:
Originally posted by ZachPruckowski
Yeah, Apple could really run a great promotion if you could get Shake, FC Express, all the iLife stuff, a Quad-core Mac Pro with a decent amount of RAM, and a 20 inch monitor for $4000 or so. The "amateur filmmaker's package" could get a lot of people interested, especially now that we seem to be moving to a system where anyone can produce content.

They could do it for five, if they wanted to.
post #699 of 947
Apple doesn't package monitors so that's probably not going to happen. But I am getting excited about the possibilities of the new Mac Pro.

I'm going to post my first spec in a long time.

This is my prediction for the highend version.
  • 2x 3GHz Woodcrest processors.
  • 2x 16x PCI-E lanes
  • 3 additional PCI-E lanes
  • Graphics card options.
    NVIDIA GeForce 7950 GX2.
    NVIDIA GeForce 7600 GT,
    NVIDIA GeForce 7300 GT,
    NVIDIA Quadro FX 45, and 5500,
    Possibility of Nvidia offering a video production SDI solution also such as the:
    NVIDIA Quadro FX 5500 SDI
  • 512MB RAM base - Up to 8, or 16GB.
  • Pioneer DVR-111D Superdrive
  • 3, or 4 Hard Drive bays 2 of which hot swappable.
  • 6 USB 2.0 ports,
  • 2 FW 800
  • 1 FW 400
  • Same case as the G5, redesigned internal setup.
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post #700 of 947
Quote:
Originally posted by onlooker
Apple doesn't package monitors so that's probably not going to happen. But I am getting excited about the possibilities of the new Mac Pro.

I'm going to post my first spec in a long time.

This is my prediction for the highend version.
  • 2x 3GHz Woodcrest processors.
  • 2x 16x PCI-E lanes
  • 3 additional PCI-E lanes
  • Graphics card options.
    NVIDIA GeForce 7950 GX2.
    NVIDIA GeForce 7600 GT,
    NVIDIA GeForce 7300 GT,
    NVIDIA Quadro FX 45, and 5500,
    Possibility of Nvidia offering a video production SDI solution also such as the:
    NVIDIA Quadro FX 5500 SDI
  • 512MB RAM base - Up to 8, or 16GB.
  • Pioneer DVR-111D Superdrive
  • 3, or 4 Hard Drive bays 2 of which hot swappable.
  • 6 USB 2.0 ports,
  • 2 FW 800
  • 1 FW 400
  • Same case as the G5, redesigned internal setup.

I like what you are thinking, but I say they need a version of the nVidia QuadroFX4500 X2, and they need to add in the SDI for viewing Shake comps

;^p
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post #701 of 947
Quote:
Originally posted by onlooker
Apple doesn't package monitors so that's probably not going to happen. But I am getting excited about the possibilities of the new Mac Pro.

I'm going to post my first spec in a long time.

This is my prediction for the highend version.
  • 2x 3GHz Woodcrest processors.
  • 2x 16x PCI-E lanes
  • 3 additional PCI-E lanes
  • Graphics card options.
    NVIDIA GeForce 7950 GX2.
    NVIDIA GeForce 7600 GT,
    NVIDIA GeForce 7300 GT,
    NVIDIA Quadro FX 45, and 5500,
    Possibility of Nvidia offering a video production SDI solution also such as the:
    NVIDIA Quadro FX 5500 SDI
  • 512MB RAM base - Up to 8, or 16GB.
  • Pioneer DVR-111D Superdrive
  • 3, or 4 Hard Drive bays 2 of which hot swappable.
  • 6 USB 2.0 ports,
  • 2 FW 800
  • 1 FW 400
  • Same case as the G5, redesigned internal setup.

The only problem is that if you're thinking SLI, it may not happen.

http://www.theinquirer.net/?article=32523

While we don't know what is up Apple's and Intel's sleeves, if the Mac Pro uses an Intel chipset, which it most assuredly will, SLI could be out of the question. If it won't work with Conroe, why should it work with Woodcrest?

Well, it won't be long before we find out.
post #702 of 947
I hope it's not the same case the Power Mac G5.
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post #703 of 947
Quote:
Originally posted by MacRonin
I like what you are thinking, but I say they need a version of the nVidia QuadroFX4500 X2, and they need to add in the SDI for viewing Shake comps

;^p

By then I'm thinking there will be a QuadroFX 5500 X2. But if the rumor melgross posted turns out to be true that may be our best option, but I hope the rumor is false.

Quote:
Originally posted by melgross
The only problem is that if you're thinking SLI, it may not happen.

http://www.theinquirer.net/?article=32523

While we don't know what is up Apple's and Intel's sleeves, if the Mac Pro uses an Intel chipset, which it most assuredly will, SLI could be out of the question. If it won't work with Conroe, why should it work with Woodcrest?

Well, it won't be long before we find out.

We'll have to see if this rumor is merely - hopefully just a rumor. I'd think there would be no problem with nvidia licensing the spec to Apple just for Apple's motherboard. Which could actually happen. Wouldn't that be the bomb if nvidia only licensed the SLI spec to intel for Apple's motherboard only. lol. That would be one hell of another feather in Apples cap to sell PC's wouldn't it. I doubt that last part will happen though.

In all honesty though does nvidia actually make a motherboard, or do others license the technology? Because Tyan has been selling 16x dual lane full speed PCI-E SLI board for over a year, and it's not carbon copy of anyone else's Nforce SLI board.
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post #704 of 947
I really don't think Apple is going to have a SLI board.

This is Apple we're talking about. They are about minimalism when it's appropriate. How many people would actually utilize dual cards in a Mac Pro?

Is this number high enough to warrant the extra engineering? They extra power and cooling requirements?

Even poring over Nvidia's site I see that SLI is still aimed at gaming. Personally I'm just not seeing where it's a "must have" feature for a professional.
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post #705 of 947
Quote:
Originally posted by hmurchison
I really don't think Apple is going to have a SLI board.

This is Apple we're talking about. They are about minimalism when it's appropriate. How many people would actually utilize dual cards in a Mac Pro?

Is this number high enough to warrant the extra engineering? They extra power and cooling requirements?

Even poring over Nvidia's site I see that SLI is still aimed at gaming. Personally I'm just not seeing where it's a "must have" feature for a professional.

Gamers loved the idea of SLI, and attached themselves to it immediately, and like any trend it sold to the masses, but it's still 2D Application compliant, with regular cards, and QuadroFX compliant for rendering every other frame per card in 3D view.

Fact is that many of the people that will use bootcamp will be using it for gaming, so there is definitely interest in it, and for Apple to have dual 16x PCI-E lanes does not mean that you need to use them both for graphics cards. If your going to have the PCI-E lanes there anyway - so why not? It's definitely not going to decrease sales, but it could help them, and there are those that do want to use it.
But if that rumor is true we are out of luck regardless.
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post #706 of 947
Quote:
Originally posted by onlooker
Gamers loved the idea of SLI,

Gamers don't buy Mac Pros.

Quote:
Fact is that many of the people that will use bootcamp will be using it for gaming,

Face it: for better or worse, Apple doesn't give a shit for Mac Pro users that want to play games. The Mac Pro is, in Apple's eyes, purely creative high-end workstation.
post #707 of 947
Quote:
Originally posted by Chucker
Gamers don't buy Mac Pros.



Face it: for better or worse, Apple doesn't give a shit for Mac Pro users that want to play games. The Mac Pro is, in Apple's eyes, purely creative high-end workstation.

Hogwash.. Apple is in it for sales. Bootcamp gives them many more avenues to pursue, and capitalize on.
Your comment on gamers don't buy Mac Pro's is ridiculous. Nobody has ever bought a Mac Pro there has never been one. But bootcamp ushers in a whole new era of uses for the Mac workstation. Alienware is the perfect example of this. Not only did they make an incredible gaming machine, but they also competed with BOXX with 3D workstations all in one system.
You can hardly compare a old mac without windows, and windows games availability to a new one, and say people don't buy them, because there is no data on that yet, and you don't even have a rounded percentile of Mac users that have installed windows for gaming let alone PC users that bought Mac's so they could. Try your story after next years WWDC. If you can.
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post #708 of 947
I did see in the Inquirer article that the intel chipsets do support ATI's equivalent, so maybe there'll be a dual-ATI option instead. I know that currently NVidia seem to have the edge on top end cards, but is it really so much that a dual-Radeon Xwhatever will be a disappointment?

Also, does the one slot, dual card thing that's just been released by NVidia need SLI on the mobo?

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post #709 of 947
Quote:
Also, does the one slot, dual card thing that's just been released by NVidia need SLI on the mobo?

Nope it should work in any PCI-Express 16x slot. This is the solution that I believe makes the most sense. If you need SLI then you have the 7950gx2.

Apple will most likely use the Intel 5000x motherboards slightly modified. Intel doesn't have dual 16x slots. It's hard to justify when predominantly your workstations are going to ship with a Quadro FX card.
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post #710 of 947
Quote:
Originally posted by onlooker
Hogwash.. Apple is in it for sales. Bootcamp gives them many more avenues to pursue, and capitalize on.

Nobody would disagree with that.

Quote:
Your comment on gamers don't buy Mac Pro's is ridiculous.

Is it?

Quote:
But bootcamp ushers in a whole new era of uses for the Mac workstation. Alienware is the perfect example of this. Not only did they make an incredible gaming machine, but they also competed with BOXX with 3D workstations all in one system.

You don't really want to compare Alienware with Apple? You don't really want Apple to inherit any of Alienware's reputation?

Quote:
Try your story after next years WWDC. If you can.

I'll call your cell.
post #711 of 947
Thread Starter 
Onlooker wins, Chucker. The Mac Pro is a high-end boutique PC like any other now, albeit with the ability to run Mac OS X. Other than that, it is just like a boutique PC like Alienware, or Falcon Northwest, or Boxx: it's higher-than-sum-of-parts priced, has a pretty polished appearance, and maybe has some out-of-the-box overclocking.

But let's admit it: Macs are PCs now, hardware-wise. Workstations play games extremely well, one could even say that gaming systems are simply overhyped workstations hardware-wise.

Basically, there's absolutely no reason to believe that it won't be an excellent gaming PC. Why? Because it's a PC. And as we all know, PCs play games pretty damned well.

End of story.

A lot of people think that "gaming machines" are something special. All they are, are computers with performance components and an above-average graphics card. This is what the Mac Pro is set to be, and as we've seen with the iMac G5 and Macbook Pro, Apple is using standard PC graphics cards, and standard Windows drivers for Bootcamp. So 1) there's no excuse for Apple to play the insanity-pricing game on graphics cards again 2) if they don't play stupid tricks, graphics cards from the off-the-shelf PC world should be usable and 3) there should be great Windows performance.
post #712 of 947
Quote:
Originally posted by Placebo
Onlooker wins, Chucker. The Mac Pro is a high-end boutique PC like any other now, albeit with the ability to run Mac OS X. Other than that, it is just like a boutique PC like Alienware, or Falcon Northwest, or Boxx: it's higher-than-sum-of-parts priced, has a pretty polished appearance, and maybe has some out-of-the-box overclocking.

I don't disagree with any of that.

Quote:
But let's admit it: Macs are PCs now, hardware-wise. Workstations play games extremely well, one could even say that gaming systems are simply overhyped workstations hardware-wise.

But nobody buys a workstation for the main (let alone sole!) purpose of gaming. Secondary purpose? Sure, why not. I do gaming on my MacBook Pro. I have Boot Camp set up mainly for that; most other Windows stuff can be done more comfortably in Parallels (aside from somewhat lacking RAM).

My point is not that Apple doesn't want people buying Mac Pros for this. Obviously they know very well that many are going to (ab)use Mac Pros (or any other Intel mac, for that matter) to play games on. Or that people are going to put random graphics cards rigs in. Or waste their money on overclocking or other such nonsense.

My point is that they probably won't advertise that. Not because they don't want to piss of Aspyr (they probably couldn't care less), but because they would represent a cliché that they don't want themselves in.

Quote:
Basically, there's absolutely no reason to believe that it won't be an excellent gaming PC. Why? Because it's a PC. And as we all know, PCs play games pretty damned well.

End of story.

I don't disagree with any of that either.

For reference, here's what onlooker quoted from my original post:

Quote:
Gamers don't buy Mac Pros.

Face it: for better or worse, Apple doesn't give a shit for Mac Pro users that want to play games. The Mac Pro is, in Apple's eyes, purely creative high-end workstation.

Nowhere am I implying that Apple has anything against people playing games on Mac Pros. Or anything against people buying Mac Pros mainly to play games on. But the latter idea seems asinine to me, as Apple's hardware simply isn't suited for that*, and the former idea, while probably quite common realistically, isn't one that Apple cares for either way. They won't do anything against it, but they (probably) won't encourage it or advertise it either.

Simply put, there's not gonna be a "Mac Pro Quake 5 LOLWTFBBQ 3D Live! BETTER GRAPHICS SLI CROSSFIRE PLUS EXTREME Edition". Ever.

*) Because its components are comparably expensive for typical gamer's gear (which is usually more optimized towards raw performance, not detailed quality), and because a lot of expandability won't be there.
post #713 of 947
Quote:
Originally posted by hmurchison
Nope it should work in any PCI-Express 16x slot. This is the solution that I believe makes the most sense. If you need SLI then you have the 7950gx2.

Apple will most likely use the Intel 5000x motherboards slightly modified. Intel doesn't have dual 16x slots. It's hard to justify when predominantly your workstations are going to ship with a Quadro FX card.

My thinking is that I don't think Apples motherboard is going to be identically spec'd with the intel motherboard because that would essentially give all PC's the ability to install OS X on a moderately hacked version of one #1, and #2 There is just a fat chance, actually slim chance that Apple will be using the standard intel board. The Chipset will be the same, or similar, but there will differences, and probably some mechanism that will keep OS X on Macs, and Macs alone. Apple also has always had a great relationship with Nvidia, and just to emphasize how great Apple feels about them they did build The Quadro FX (Finally) for the Mac platform. #3 Apple always goes with the current leader for the workstations (Nvidia) and uses who ever is trailing (ATI) in their laptops. It keeps the relationship with both parties current, open, and in good standing. #4 I expect options on the cards like last time. Apple wont just use the QuaroFX. THere will most assuredly be options for other less expensive cards.
onlooker
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http://www.apple.com/feedback/macpro.html
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onlooker
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Join Date: Dec 2001
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http://www.apple.com/feedback/macpro.html
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post #714 of 947
Quote:
Originally posted by onlooker
Apple always goes with the current leader for the workstations (Nvidia) and uses who ever is trailing (ATI) in their laptops.

I think that's mostly coincidence. Mobility Radeons right now are simply more fit for Apple's laptops; that is, they may not be high-performance, but low-power/low-heat output. nVidia GeForce Gos hardly ever fit that bill.
post #715 of 947
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally posted by Chucker

*) Because its components are comparably expensive for typical gamer's gear (which is usually more optimized towards raw performance, not detailed quality)

I was going to make a real reply to your post, but then I saw that, and thought, man, this guy really has no clue what he's talking about.
post #716 of 947
Quote:
Originally posted by Placebo
I was going to make a real reply to your post, but then I saw that, and thought, man, this guy really has no clue what he's talking about.

Now you finally know how I feel.
post #717 of 947
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally posted by Chucker
Now you finally know how I feel.

No, that would be if I felt unable to think critically and especially prone to generalization.
post #718 of 947
Quote:
Originally posted by Placebo
No, that would be if I felt unable to think critically and especialy prone to generalization.

I'm not interested in this petty talk. You're either going to respond to my post, or forget about it.
post #719 of 947
actually Chucker is thinking critically.

Some of us older folks have followed Apple before the Macintosh even existed.

At times Apple would offer cursory support for gaming but it always felt like a "back burner" thing. We remember the game sprockets that eventually got old and decrepit. Thus when Chucker says the Mac Pro isn't made for gamers he's right. Apple isn't going to prevent gaming but they don't exactly encourage it either.

Bootcamp is going to be our only salvation here for the time being. With that in mind I find that two slot SLI in a Mac Pro has about a %25 chance of being in the computer. But even without that we'll still be able to game. I just don't expect Quad SLI Mac systems to be blasting through games. Reality bites sometimes.
He's a mod so he has a few extra vBulletin privileges. That doesn't mean he should stop posting or should start acting like Digital Jesus.
- SolipsismX
Reply
He's a mod so he has a few extra vBulletin privileges. That doesn't mean he should stop posting or should start acting like Digital Jesus.
- SolipsismX
Reply
post #720 of 947
Thread Starter 
Oh wait, you mean to encourage gaming in Mac OS X? I meant in Windows. Few people are going to game in OS X ever again with a nicely specced Mac Pro. Mac OS X isn't really made for gaming; Windows is. The Mac Pro is set to be a boutique PC that runs Windows and its games, no doubt just as quickly as a PC with the same motherboard. This is not Apple handing out money begging developers to make games for OS X; it's Apple saying "you can install Windows on a Mac, and it will run your games incredibly well because the Mac Pro is a high-end PC".
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