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If Apple asked "you" what apps you would like that are not available on the Mac...

post #1 of 124
Thread Starter 
.. what would they be? and why?

To narrow it a bit you can only choose 3 apps that you personally could use that are not available or 3 apps that you would like to see that you may not use but you know it would help bring in more market share.

(note: this isn't to convince software companies to create or port there apps, instead it's to have Apple create similar apps that are user friendly)

The apps I wish would be available are:

AutoCad -> my girlfriend uses it alot and if it were available for a Mac she would switch just like me (well she'll probably switch anyways.. )

Sap2000 -> Same reason as above.

those are the 2 that I think are most important, that way (Civil) Engineers would be inclined to switch to Macs.

Well that's my 2 cents, I would love to hear (or in this case read) what you guys and gals think!!

Btw this is just hipotetical (sp?)
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An apple a day, keeps Microsoft away
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MacBook 1.83GHz, 1GB of Ram --> A more elegant notebook, for a more civilized age

An apple a day, keeps Microsoft away
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post #2 of 124
SolidWorks should be nice...

And the Windows media 10 codec
post #3 of 124
I like Access, but I know Microsoft will not create a version for the Mac. Their web site says there is not enough demand for them to port it, but I think it is because having a Mac version of Access would make it easier for people to move to the Mac since it is one of the "must-have-Windows-only" applications. I am sure there are technical reasons that would make it difficult to port, but nothing Microsoft can't do if they put an honest effort into it.

Hopefully, Apple will create a database that is a true RDMS, not a flat-file like the one that comes with AppleWorks. Two things I would like this database to have is support for ObjC and use IB for the UI.
post #4 of 124
Quote:
Originally posted by troberts
I like Access, but I know Microsoft will not create a version for the Mac. Their web site says there is not enough demand for them to port it, but I think it is because having a Mac version of Access would make it easier for people to move to the Mac since it is one of the "must-have-Windows-only" applications. I am sure there are technical reasons that would make it difficult to port, but nothing Microsoft can't do if they put an honest effort into it.

Hopefully, Apple will create a database that is a true RDMS, not a flat-file like the one that comes with AppleWorks. Two things I would like this database to have is support for ObjC and use IB for the UI.

Oh, for heaven's sake. Access is a POS that could never succeed in the marketplace on its own merits. If Microsoft had not bundled it in Office from the start, it would be remembered less fundly than Bob. If you want an Apple-developed RDMS, FileMaker is a wonderful product. The RDMS from the Apple subsidiary is but one of several professional RDMSes on the Mac. Like FileMaker, 4th Dimension is a cross-platform DBMS from a veteran Mac developer. If these are too rich for your blood, look no further than the Developer Tools CD that shipped with your computer or OS. It contains fully-functional OpenBase. You can't beat the price.
post #5 of 124
Quote:
Originally posted by Mr. Me
Oh, for heaven's sake. Access is a POS that could never succeed in the marketplace on its own merits. If Microsoft had not bundled it in Office from the start, it would be remembered less fundly than Bob. If you want an Apple-developed RDMS, FileMaker is a wonderful product. The RDMS from the Apple subsidiary is but one of several professional RDMSes on the Mac. Like FileMaker, 4th Dimension is a cross-platform DBMS from a veteran Mac developer. If these are too rich for your blood, look no further than the Developer Tools CD that shipped with your computer or OS. It contains fully-functional OpenBase. You can't beat the price.

He's not debating that Access is a POS. He's saying some people need it regardless of what else is available.
My computer can beat up your computer.
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My computer can beat up your computer.
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post #6 of 124
MSN 7.5. Yep I realise we have Messenger for Mac, but it sucks real bad.

I have the most amazing of computers (iMac G5 iSight) that I do heaps of cool things with. I've never regretted switching, but talking to my friends online is a big deal to me, and having MSN with iSight support would make my Mac experience totally complete. but instead not having this option is the only negative I have encountered since switching to Mac pre-Christmas.

Dan
post #7 of 124
nm - mods pls delete this.
'L'enfer, c'est les autres' - JPS
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'L'enfer, c'est les autres' - JPS
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post #8 of 124
1. KOffice 2.0.
2. FULL Windows Media Codec 10+ support.
3. uTorrent.
4. K3B
5. Foobar
'L'enfer, c'est les autres' - JPS
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'L'enfer, c'est les autres' - JPS
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post #9 of 124
1. Something like Microsoft Streets and Trips, preferably with GPS support
2. Project Management App that can not only read, but also write MS-Project files (.mpp)
3. A spreadsheet as part of iWork that can read and write Excel files if needed

These are the three I would give my first-born for.

Oh, and for Yahoo Messenger to start supporting voice chat on MacOSX!

Cheers
post #10 of 124
A good PSX and N64 emulator.
post #11 of 124
Quote:
Originally posted by kim kap sol
A good PSX and N64 emulator.

SixtyForce was updated recently you know...

There's also Mupen64, which gives pretty good results. As far as PSX emulators are concerned though - it's all gone downhill ever since Sony bought over Connetix Virtual Game Station.

edit: I was messing around looking for a link to Mupen64 and I found out it was a universal binary already in November 2005!
post #12 of 124
Quote:
Originally posted by Mr. Me
If these are too rich for your blood, look no further than the Developer Tools CD that shipped with your computer or OS. It contains fully-functional OpenBase. You can't beat the price.

I looked at the packages in my Tiger DVD and I was not able to find the OpenBase installation package so I went to the OpenBase web site and downloaded the latest version for OS X which includes administration tools. I also saw OpenBase has Objective-C interface APIs. From what little I have read I think OpenBase is what I am looking for and will keep me busy for a while.
post #13 of 124
3D Studio MAX - Its the only thing that we have a suite of PCs left for. If this was available for MacOS then we could go 100% Mac . . . maybe.
Greatly Insane
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Greatly Insane
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post #14 of 124
Solidworks, AutoCAD and 3DSMAX
post #15 of 124
Quote:
Originally posted by yama

edit: I was messing around looking for a link to Mupen64 and I found out it was a universal binary already in November 2005!

This isn't quite true. The Universal Binary only got released less than a month ago while the 0.5 PPC version has been around since about Nov 2005.

Mupen is not what I'd consider a "good N64 emulator". I'm looking for a good one.
post #16 of 124
1. Microsoft Money (Quicken kinda sucks)
2. AutoDesk G.I.S. Software

Don't know of anymore.
post #17 of 124
Quote:
Originally posted by tilt
1. Something like Microsoft Streets and Trips, preferably with GPS support
2. Project Management App that can not only read, but also write MS-Project files (.mpp)
3. A spreadsheet as part of iWork that can read and write Excel files if needed

These are the three I would give my first-born for.

Oh, and for Yahoo Messenger to start supporting voice chat on MacOSX!

Cheers

1. Absolutely.

2. It's already here. And since Apple is listed as a user, it must be good.

3. It's coming in January. It has to be....
The evil that we fight is but the shadow of the evil that we do.
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The evil that we fight is but the shadow of the evil that we do.
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post #18 of 124
Quote:
Originally posted by Frank777
2. It's already here. And since Apple is listed as a user, it must be good.

Thanks for the link Frank.

Cheers
post #19 of 124
1. Adobe Premiere Pro
2. Adobe Audition
3. Chief Architect
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- SolipsismX
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He's a mod so he has a few extra vBulletin privileges. That doesn't mean he should stop posting or should start acting like Digital Jesus.
- SolipsismX
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post #20 of 124
1. 3DS MAX
2. Spreadsheet in iWork
3. Maya (yeah, it's OSX, but for how long now Autodesk has bought it ?)
4. Database in iWork
5. AutoCAD, not because it's the best (because it isn't), but because it's an industry standard. Like it or not. (Same more or less for 3DS Max, BTW.)
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2x2.7 PowerMac - 1.25 Powerbook - 10.4 Tiger - '65 Mustang
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post #21 of 124
1. Fill out iWork fully so it can totally replace AppleWorks. Include a spreadsheet and a FileMaker Jr. database.

2. An easy Firewire based syncing app that will let me keep my iMac and PB in sync.

3. Purchase Parallels and bring it up to a high standard - and drive MS nuts.

4. Aperture Jr. for us less talented.
Ken
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Ken
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post #22 of 124
1., 2., and 3. 3ds max. I'm thinking about getting a new iMac purely for Boot Camp, but I don't want to be slowed down in Photoshop, Illustrator, and After Effects (at least FCS is universal).
post #23 of 124
Quote:
Originally posted by kenaustus
2. An easy Firewire based syncing app that will let me keep my iMac and PB in sync.

It is unbelievable to me that fifteen years after the first Powerbook, a full decade into the email revolution and on the verge of the fifth revision to OS X, there is still no way to reliably synchronize one's email between a Power Mac and a PowerBook.

It renders a second computer next to useless, and makes working on the go more confusing (and we switched to Macs to avoid such confusion.)

Lastly, it costs Apple sales, by locking many users into choosing to work either at a Laptop or Desktop, when they could be owners of both.

If RIM's Blackberry can sync messages reliably, why can't Apple's products?
The evil that we fight is but the shadow of the evil that we do.
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The evil that we fight is but the shadow of the evil that we do.
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post #24 of 124
I want...

1) Quicken (Windows version) for OS X. Yes, I know about Quicken for Mac - but it SUCKS! They're like two totally different apps.

2) Microsoft Money.
post #25 of 124
i have just one:

ProDesktop (3d modelling program)

nice and easy to use but powerful at the same time.

stu
post #26 of 124
Quote:
Originally posted by kenaustus
4. Aperture Jr. for us less talented.

They call it "iPhoto"
post #27 of 124
Quote:
Originally posted by Frank777
It is unbelievable to me that fifteen years after the first Powerbook, a full decade into the email revolution and on the verge of the fifth revision to OS X, there is still no way to reliably synchronize one's email between a Power Mac and a PowerBook.

It renders a second computer next to useless, and makes working on the go more confusing (and we switched to Macs to avoid such confusion.)

Lastly, it costs Apple sales, by locking many users into choosing to work either at a Laptop or Desktop, when they could be owners of both.

Your email synching problems should be solved by using the IMAP protocol: The messages remain on the server. They can be downloaded for working on the go and changes can be synched the next time you are online.

Apple's own Mail.app does seem to ommit some IMAP features, though.

I'd be delighted if someone could explain to me how to subscribe to and unsubscribe from IMAP folders in Mail.app or recommend an other fully IMAP-capable email-client besides Thunderbird.

There is a feature in OS X Server that covers most portable synching needs which I think they should also make available in the regular version. Or maybe they could release a home/small business server version (maybe up to 5 clients) that make it easy to administer small (home/SoHo) networks as well as manage all of the digital media content in a household... one can dream.

Quote:
From Apple's OS X Server website
Network and Portable Home Directories
You can also use Workgroup Manager to provide network-based home directories, so users can access their own personalized desktop, applications and files from any computer on the network or use them to back up their work. With Mac OS X Server v10.4, PowerBook and iBook users can now enjoy synchronized versions of home directory folders locally and on the network. When a user goes offline, her home directory goes with her, so she can continue to work just as if she would back at the office. When she reconnects to the network, Mac OS X automatically syncs up selected content in her local home directory with the one on the server.
post #28 of 124
I totally agree with the thoughts about Streets & Trips, but would definately NOT want Microsoft -- I dislike ANYTHING Microsoft -- too user unfriendly. Delorme makes a great product (Street Atlas), but no longer for macs -- that product is far superior, in my opinion, than any other mapping for any platform. I could even get my husband to switch if he could get that!

I also agree that Quicken for macs is horrible -- we need something better. MSMoney is good, but again, won't use anything MS.

Just my two cents!
Mary
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Mary
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post #29 of 124
VISIO

VISIO


and

VISIO


OOo/staroffice OSX native, none of this 3rd party hack-a-day Neooffice crap

And lets think the other way for a second: APPLE GIVE US A GOD DAMND KEYNOTE PRESENTER FOR WINDOWS...Timed QT videos dont cut it out here in the real world.
You can't quantify how much I don't care -- Bob Kevoian of the Bob and Tom Show.
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You can't quantify how much I don't care -- Bob Kevoian of the Bob and Tom Show.
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post #30 of 124
GIS software...and yeah an N64 emulator! Ok off to check back on sixtyforce...crap I should be writing a paper!
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"Overpopulation and climate change are serious shit." Gilsch
"I was really curious how they had managed such fine granularity of alienation." addabox
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post #31 of 124
Quote:
Originally posted by Darth_Apple
.. what would they be? and why?

AutoCad -> my girlfriend uses it alot and if it were available for a Mac she would switch just like me (well she'll probably switch anyways.. )

I don't intend to sound like a mac fanboy here, since I wouldn't mind if most of these programs were available on the mac either. I'm more intent on trying to help folks looking for mac equivalents.


CAD Tools:

I get the feeling that the only people who know about FormZ are people who already use it, as well as EIAS users. It can do DWG, DXF, and a zillion other formats, has 2D and 3D capabilities, and *gasp* has an exhaustive set of parametric tools. Autodesk's shocking lack of anything parametric should be enough to label it as "worthless." Why anyone still uses AutoCAD (or 3DSMAX) is a mystery to me.

As for SolidWorks, yeah, that's a nice one to have, but mostly for the analysis tools and those sorts of things. It seems, though, that it's not unlikely that SolidWorks will at some point show up on the mac. ProE/ProDesktop probably won't, but seriously, if you can't do it in FormZ or the potential SolidWorks version for mac, then it's something that can't be done.

Visio:

I have it on my PC and I use Illustrator instead. Maybe you've found the secret to make Visio not such a pain in the ass -- please share (I'm serious). Even so, OmniGraffle is a pretty solid Visio clone on the mac.


Personally, I'd like to see a standalone tex program similar to the likes of lyx. I'd also like to have the Xilinx ISE on the mac, but that's not going to happen, since macs don't have parallel ports anyway! There is a version of the ISE for Linux, however.
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post #32 of 124
I like that idea of encouraging anyone that knows of worthy equivalents to share.

If anyone knows of a GIS app for Mac PLEASE tell me I will be eternally indebted.

And NO, Grass or whatever the crap that open source stuff is...does not count. I tried it. Last week. Junk.
"Overpopulation and climate change are serious shit." Gilsch
"I was really curious how they had managed such fine granularity of alienation." addabox
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"Overpopulation and climate change are serious shit." Gilsch
"I was really curious how they had managed such fine granularity of alienation." addabox
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post #33 of 124
I figure I'll add one more: Allegro

If Allegro and the Xilinx ISO were on the mac, I'd never need to use a PC, but I'm not holding my breath.
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post #34 of 124
Quote:
Originally posted by Splinemodel

Visio:

I have it on my PC and I use Illustrator instead. Maybe you've found the secret to make Visio not such a pain in the ass -- please share (I'm serious). Even so, OmniGraffle is a pretty solid Visio clone on the mac.

Yes, Visio may be a pain, and accually a little overwheming for first timers, but using illistrator for topology layout, DFDs, flowcharts and the like would be like using a sledge hammer to drive a nail on which you will hang a photo. There is also a world of lockin, TONS, and I mean thousands of stencils are made for Visio, I would rather pay $200 for Visio:mac than convert my collection of ~1500 Cisco/Adtran/HP/Dell/IBM hardware icons, the ~500 generic logos (think Hocky-Puck routers) and all of the general purpose templates that MS includes to work with a differant tool like Graffle.

And as to the "make visio not such a pain in the ass" request: buy a book, hell I will sell you mine, it is acctually really straight forward when you know what you are doing...kinda like...illustrator, it is a pro app, the scale tilts more to the side of power over usability, just like the Adobe apps...Ever seen a noob try to do a project end to end in CS...it is kinda funny.
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post #35 of 124
Quote:
Originally posted by a_greer
And as to the "make visio not such a pain in the ass" request: buy a book, hell I will sell you mine, it is acctually really straight forward when you know what you are doing...kinda like...illustrator, it is a pro app, the scale tilts more to the side of power over usability, just like the Adobe apps...Ever seen a noob try to do a project end to end in CS...it is kinda funny.

I think the learning curve for Adobe Apps is highly overrated. When you think about it, MS Office probably has a much higher learning curve. But that's another topic.

Anyway, I make mostly block digrams and engineering things. Illustrator just can make them so darn pretty. Example
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post #36 of 124
Quote:
Originally posted by Macvault
I want...

1) Quicken (Windows version) for OS X. Yes, I know about Quicken for Mac - but it SUCKS! They're like two totally different apps.

2) Microsoft Money.

Completely agree.
post #37 of 124
Microsoft Access

Microsoft SQL Server

Autocad
post #38 of 124
Quote:
Originally posted by Splinemodel
I think the learning curve for Adobe Apps is highly overrated. When you think about it, MS Office probably has a much higher learning curve. But that's another topic.

Anyway, I make mostly block digrams and engineering things. Illustrator just can make them so darn pretty. Example

WOW...how long did that take? and did you have to draw the lines, or could you just select a point a and b and maybe a c point for a direction change and have the line autogenerate(I have yet to master the use of a Wacom pen, it just isnt like a ball-point )

I may be able to do something like that in visio, but it would take about 2 hours, at least at my level. That is amazing.

edit:
adobe isnt really too hard once you learn one app, but it is a bytch for noobs to learn. I can use PS, but I sure as hell cant use it efficiantly, compared to the guys who give demos that I have seen, sooo many hidden keyboard shortcuts, so many key combos, so little time to learn them all.
You can't quantify how much I don't care -- Bob Kevoian of the Bob and Tom Show.
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You can't quantify how much I don't care -- Bob Kevoian of the Bob and Tom Show.
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post #39 of 124
Quote:
Originally posted by a_greer
WOW...how long did that take? and did you have to draw the lines, or could you just select a point a and b and maybe a c point for a direction change and have the line autogenerate(I have yet to master the use of a Wacom pen, it just isnt like a ball-point )

I may be able to do something like that in visio, but it would take about 2 hours, at least at my level. That is amazing.

edit:
adobe isnt really too hard once you learn one app, but it is a bytch for noobs to learn. I can use PS, but I sure as hell cant use it efficiantly, compared to the guys who give demos that I have seen, sooo many hidden keyboard shortcuts, so many key combos, so little time to learn them all.

Thing is, MS apps have the same problems. It's just that, these days, people are beaten over the head with MS Apps since age 3, so it "seems" easier. But yes, once you figure out one Adobe app, the rest come easily.

The drawing itself was pretty quick to do. I have a few custom swatches and symbol libraries I use to make the blocks, and now it ends up taking about as long as it would in Visio. I use "snap to point" and "snap to grid" to give it a really similar feel to Visio. I think the original reason I stopped using Visio was precisely that it's not very easy (if possible at all) to control how the interconnect lines bend and overlap. When you need to make a multi-forking flowchart or whatnot, I would spend more time in Visio trying to figure out how to "trick" the program into doing what I wanted to do rather than actually doing it. It was then that I promptly exited the program, opened Illustrator, and stayed late that day making the symbol libraries I needed. In Illustrator it's really easy to add and subtract points from the paths (lines), which is good when you need to make alterations.
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post #40 of 124
Paint
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