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Apple's Safari showing major growth amongst browsers

post #1 of 36
Thread Starter 
The popularity of Apple Computer's Safari Web browser continues to grow at a noticeable pace this year, with recent market share figures pointing to an over 75 percent increase in usage over the past twelve months.

Although it maintains its standing as the No. 3 browser on the Internet, a recent market share report by Net Applications shows Apple's WebKit-based Safari to have garnered a 3.19 percent share in March, an increase of 1.81 percent from last year.

During the same time period, Microsoft's Internet Explorer saw its market share slip over 3 percent, from 88 percent down to 84.70 percent. FireFox -- the only other browser to succeed Safari in the rankings -- appears to have benefitted the greatest from Explorer's slump, posting a near 3 percent gain to 10.05 percent market share, up from 7.38 percent a year ago.

When Safari's 3.19 percent share is broken down into specific versions, the Mac OS X 10.3 "Panther" version of the Apple browser represented a 1.14 percent share, while the Mac OS X 10.4 "Tiger" version accounted for 1.94 percent. Safari users running Mac OS X 10.2 "Jaguar" account for just 0.10 percent of Internet traffic.

Comments made by Safari software engineers imply that the browser's market share should continue to post gains this year, especially as WebKit-based browsers start hitting other platforms like Nokias S60.

The new browser for the S60 enables a full Web browsing experience on mobile devices, with wide support of industry standards including W3C's HTML 4.01, XHTML 1.0, CSS 1, 2, & 3 (partially), DOM 1, 2, SVG-Tiny, and Web standards such as, ECMAScript, Netscape style plug-ins such as Flash Lite and audio.

The same market share report noted above also shows that Apple's Mac OS X operation system is slowly gaining popularity amongst Internet users. From April 2005 to March 2006, users of the Apple OS on the Net increase in share by over 0.75 percent, from 3.52 percent to 4.29 percent.

Safari (Tiger) Market Share Gains. Credits: Net Applications
post #2 of 36
Is that because

a) Apple is gaining market share

or

b) Mac users are switching from Internet Explorer/Firefox to Safari


Most likely it is both, but how is the ration a to b?
post #3 of 36
I hope there are no Mac users left still using Internet Exploder.
post #4 of 36
An innocent question: when they measure how much Macs vs. Windows PCs are used on the Internet, does malware-related traffic get counted?
post #5 of 36
As an aside, the increase of the Mac OS in that final sentence is a 21% increase of marketshare. It's confusing to say .75 percentage gain.
post #6 of 36
Yay! Now, how much larger of a share does Safari need before Google properly supports it for Gmail/Calendar?

rhetorical question - no response needed
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post #7 of 36
Exactly how does the N60 using WebKit help Safari's marketshare?
post #8 of 36
Quote:
Originally posted by Robin Hood
I hope there are no Mac users left still using Internet Exploder.

I wish that no humans anywhere on earth would have ever used it.

DOWN WITH IE 4EVAR!
post #9 of 36
Does that mean one day the amazing use of Gmail will be all through Safari. That's about the only reason I have Firefox now; is because I can chat and people don't have to download anything. I used to have Firefox for those few sites that don't accept what Safari's putting out but those are becoming fewer and farther in between.
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post #10 of 36
Google must really hate Safari because it doesn't work with Google Calendar. Hopefully they will fix that (and add iCal integration?) soon!
post #11 of 36
i'm enjoying safari right now on my macbook but i might still switch to firefox once it is intel native.


safari still needs more support.
post #12 of 36
Firefox IS Intel native currently.

But I have no need for it--I just don't seem to run across sites that Safari can't handle. (And I don't spoof browsers either.) I'll stick with Safari because it's compact and efficient for my needs--but I do like the intra-page search in Firefox.
post #13 of 36
Quote:
Originally posted by fabsgwu
Google must really hate Safari because it doesn't work with Google Calendar. Hopefully they will fix that (and add iCal integration?) soon!

The problem, as I understand it, is that Safari does not have the advanced tools necessary to do all the fancy tricks that AJAX-enabled websites are able to do.

Yes, it would be great if it supported Safari. (They have a slightly crippled version of GMail that supports Safari.) But it would be even nicer if Apple added all the necessary funtionality to Safari.

:d
post #14 of 36
Quote:
Originally posted by Robin Hood
I hope there are no Mac users left still using Internet Exploder.

Nordea in Denmark only supports IE on the Mac for their online bank. (Though Firefox 1.0-1.0.7 also works, while 1.5+ doesnt! )
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post #15 of 36
I am actually curious to know how they get these stats, since if its usage statistics, then these will vary depending on the web site. Different web sites attract different types of customers, one set could contain a larger number of Mac users relative to another.

For example imagine how skewed it would be if it was Appleinsider reporting their usage stats.
post #16 of 36
there are some things that I really like about Firefox but its the .mac syncing and integration that keeps me using Safari. Its awesome to have your home, work and portable computers always up to date with the my latest bookmarks.
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post #17 of 36
I would suspect the figures are actually underreporting Safari usage.

Many Safari users have the debug menu installed and are setting User Agent to IE Win/Firefox/etc. in order to obtain full functionality at non-standard sites.

The actual Safari figure probably doesn't include those spoofing as a less appealing browser.

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post #18 of 36
The best damn browser i've used. I'm not that fond of Firefox, I like Safari much more!
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post #19 of 36
Quote:
Originally posted by dak splunder
The problem, as I understand it, is that Safari does not have the advanced tools necessary to do all the fancy tricks that AJAX-enabled websites are able to do.

Yes, it would be great if it supported Safari. (They have a slightly crippled version of GMail that supports Safari.) But it would be even nicer if Apple added all the necessary funtionality to Safari.

:d

Well that is definitely not the case. Safari can handle XMLHttpRequest. How do you think most dashboard widgets work? iWeb also uses AJAX for the slideshows. Safari certainly has the "advanced tools" that are necessary for AJAX.
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"Slow vehicle speeds with frequent stops would signal traffic congestion, for instance."

uh... it could also signal that my Mom is at the wheel...
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post #20 of 36
Quote:
Originally posted by nagromme
I just don't seem to run across sites that Safari can't handle.

Same here.

One problem with Safari that I haven't solved yet is for a friend who can't use it with CompuServe (go ahead and laugh; I do). It goes into some wonky JavaScript loop during login and eventually lands on some error page. No plugins or other stuff that might interfere with it. I later replicated it on my system using an AIM account, which made it particularly puzzling since I couldn't imagine such a seemingly obvious problem being a general one ...

Hmm, took a interrupt to try it now and it seems to be working even though I'm pretty sure I'd checked again it after installing 10.4.6. I'll have to give me friend a call and see if it's fixed for him, too. That way he wouldn't have to keep using Firefox only for reading CompuServe mail when he'd rather just be using Safari.
post #21 of 36
Quote:
Originally posted by Robin Hood
I hope there are no Mac users left still using Internet Exploder.

Unfortunately, I still have to if I want to check my 401k plan online. It only works with IE. That really burns me.
post #22 of 36
Quote:
Originally posted by Mr Beardsley
Well that is definitely not the case. Safari can handle XMLHttpRequest. How do you think most dashboard widgets work? iWeb also uses AJAX for the slideshows. Safari certainly has the "advanced tools" that are necessary for AJAX.

You're wrong. Yes, Safari supports XHTMLHttpRequest, but there's more to most web apps than just that.
post #23 of 36
Quote:
Originally posted by AppleInsider
From April 2005 to March 2006, users of the Apple OS on the Net increase in share by over 0.75 percent, from 3.52 percent to 4.29 percent.

Er... 3.52% to 4.29% is a .75% increase?

That's great news. Much more important than Safari's increase as it tells us the Mac OS X is gaining ground at a very nice rate. After all, that is the reason behind Safari's increase in popularity.
post #24 of 36
Another note, don't forget that Safari is based on WebKit (open source), which is a branch of kHTML. People are working hard to improve compatibility and even making it available to other platforms - the core engine that is.
post #25 of 36
Quote:
Originally posted by Chucker
You're wrong. Yes, Safari supports XHTMLHttpRequest, but there's more to most web apps than just that.

No, I'm not wrong. AJAX is DXHTML and XMLHttpRequest. Safari has no problem with either. Safari has some of the best CSS support of any browser, and also supports almost all of DOM 2. Those are what is required for DHTML. So what exactly is Sarari (or webkit) missing?

Here's a link that shows how well WebKit did back in september.
http://webkit.opendarwin.org/blog/?p=27
"Slow vehicle speeds with frequent stops would signal traffic congestion, for instance."

uh... it could also signal that my Mom is at the wheel...
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"Slow vehicle speeds with frequent stops would signal traffic congestion, for instance."

uh... it could also signal that my Mom is at the wheel...
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post #26 of 36
In my case, I have switched from Safari to Camino.
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post #27 of 36
Quote:
Originally posted by DanMacMan
In my case, I have switched from Safari to Camino.

Same here. Safari is nice (especially once purged of brushed metal via UNO) but I've found it unstable since about 10.4.4 crashing once a day or so on me (and yes before UNO too). I've used Safari since it was in beta, my Jaguar PowerBook shipping with IE much to my Mac newb surprise. Safari blew it away and my newbishness waned in time.

Camino meanwhile is a swift little SOB and has my undivided attention now!

Safari and Camino are both way better than Firefox on Windows of course, and comparing even that to IE is to set out on a search for a truly outlandish euphemism...
post #28 of 36
Quote:
I hope there are no Mac users left still using Internet Exploder.

There are TONS. Everyone on OS 9 (even though the % is small it's a lot of people), and still a lot of people on early OS X and even some still on the later OS X releases. Hard to believe, I know. But some people still have AOL. They just don't know where the intarweb is if the blue E is not there. That is the interweb. You see?
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post #29 of 36
Quote:
Originally posted by Aquatic
There are TONS. Everyone on OS 9 (even though the % is small it's a lot of people), and still a lot of people on early OS X and even some still on the later OS X releases. Hard to believe, I know. But some people still have AOL. They just don't know where the intarweb is if the blue E is not there. That is the interweb. You see?

Although it may be true that some people who are still running MacOS 9 use Internet Explorer, this is no way implies that all of them are. MacOS 9 shipped [and Classic still ships] with Netscape Communicator in addition to Internet Explorer. Many MacOS 9 users prefer it to IE. Many others run Netscape 5, 6, or 7. Still others run Mozilla. Some run Opera or iCab. I use MacOS X 10.4.6 are my OS almost exclusively, but I most certainly remember not only a time before Microsoft adopted the blue E for its Internet Explorer icon; I remember a time when there was no Internet Explorer at all. Before, making broad statements about other people's knowledge, one would do well to inventory one's own.
post #30 of 36
Quote:
Originally posted by Mr. Me
Before, making broad statements about other people's knowledge, one would do well to inventory one's own.

Boy, you don't get it, do you. People who aren't computer-literate like you or me, people who don't read computer websites, people who barely know the difference between shutting down and restarting a computer -- these people often use Internet Explorer because that's the only browser they know. In fact, many of these people don't even know what the word "browser" means. All they know is Internet Explorer is The Web. Or The Internet. And that's a big step for them, because they previously thought AOL was The Internet.

These people don't see a difference between browsers, except that some browsers look different that Internet Explorer. (Different buttons, bookmarks instead of favorites...) They don't know tabs, they don't know control-clicking, they don't change preferences... and these, my friend, are unfortunately the majority of users. Without education, if they see the blue E in the dock next to the Safari compass, and they want to go online, they'll click the one they think will put them on the internet. And guess what, it's not the compass.

Sad, but true.

:d
post #31 of 36
Quote:
Originally posted by dak splunder
Boy, you don't get it, do you. ...

How do you figure that, newbie?
post #32 of 36
Quote:
Originally posted by Mr. Me
How do you figure that, newbie?

Ouch.
My small number of posts to this particular website sure does make me a loser.
But, Mr. Me, your large number of posts supports my point -- you are a knowledgable Mac user. You get and understand computers and the web. You would never think of using Internet Explorer. Neither would I.

However, I'm lucky enough to work in offices where people use Macs. Hundreds of Macs. And day after day, year after year, I see people sitting at their computers, usually running Panther or Tiger but occasionally Jaguar, and time and time again I see them using Internet Explorer to browse the web. Their screen resolution settings are lame, they don't know expose exists, they constantly minimize windows to the dock instead of ever "hiding" anything, they use AOL instant messenger instead of iChat or Adium, Microsoft Word doesn't have any of the Service Release updates, the little @ icon is still next to the trash can in the dock. They just don't know, nobody has ever sat down to teach them, they don't even want to learn. What they do seems to work, and that's that.

They watch me use my computer and they can't believe the way I switch between progams using Command-Tab (or Apple-Tab, since they've never heard of the "command" key), or they way I switch windows with command-~, or the way I right click, or use smooth scrolling, or keep my desktop organized, or use different finder views, or anything. But they don't want to learn, either. They prefer to just hobble along, confident in their narrow scope of understanding. And in that narrow scope, Internet Explorer is the thing you use to go on the internet.

That's how I figure that, geek who has posted over a thousand times to a rumor site message board.

:d
post #33 of 36
Shit, some people can't even tell the different between the big blue E and Teh Intarweb. They don't even know that there could possibly be something that lets your browse the internet and, um, uh.. isn't IE.

Do I have it right Mr. Me or do you not count non-newbies' opinions?
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post #34 of 36
Quote:
Originally posted by Gene Clean
...

Do I have it right Mr. Me or do you not count non-newbies' opinions?

What I don't count is someone who knows squat trying to tell me what I get and what I don't. On a less personal level--for me, at least--dak splunder makes the fundamental mistake of believing that his personal experiences are universal and that his opinion is anything more than that--his opinion.
post #35 of 36
Quote:
Originally posted by Mr. Me
What I don't count is someone who knows squat trying to tell me what I get and what I don't. On a less personal level--for me, at least--dak splunder makes the fundamental mistake of believing that his personal experiences are universal and that his opinion is anything more than that--his opinion.

Unfortunately, Mr. Me, dak splunder is right. This is how most people are with a computer. And he's not telling you what to think, he's just observing a fact of live.
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post #36 of 36
I must weigh in here Dak Splunder is right.


The vast majority of the internet users use IE for no other reason as that is what they know. Yes, it is crappy, full of holes an insecure, but, that is all they know...



Mac users are the ones who have broken free of that crappy paradigm that is Win XP and IE.



But we are still in 1984 like it or not..


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